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mam 



The Virgi^^ 



Friday, Aprti 3, im 




W. SrflTE L 
TN; IRIS - 
800 E BROAD 
ichmond 



Spring Wine Fest 

The second annual 24th Street Sluing Wii» 
Fest presented by Fann Fresh is scheduled for 
Saturday and Sunday, April 18-19, from noon 
to 6 p.m. each Uay at 24th Street Park in 
Virginia Beach. If you've been cooped up all 
winter and need a breath of fresh air, this 
casual, down to earth affair on the oceanfiontis 
just what the doctor cxdaed. 

Wine Fest attendees can purchase a package 
which includes an event wine glass and 10 (aste 
tickets for $15 at the door. Proceeds benefit 
local Virginia Beach charitable organizations. 
Continuous entmainment will be programmed 
on the 24th Street Park stage. Food and 
beverage vendors will be on-site. For more 
information on the fest call Sponsorships 
Unlimited, 491-6539. 



Sunrise service 

The 71st Annual Easter Sunrise Service will 
be held at the Cape Henry Memorial Cross at 
Fort Story on Easter Sunday, April 12. at 6:30 
a.m. The service will be ecumenical, with the 
Rev. David Ford, associate pastor of Virginia 
Beach United MeUiodist Church, (fclivoing the 
sermon. Music will be provided by the Amied 
Forces School of Music Student Band, Naval 
Amphibious Base, Little Creek. The service is 
s]!)onsored by the Beach Borough, Virginia 
Beach Ministerial Association, the city of 
Virginia Beach and Fort Story. In the event of 
inclement weather, the service will be held at 
7:30 a.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 
36th Street and Pacific Avenue, Virginia 
Beach. 



Sweet treats 

The Virginia Beach Christian Women's 
Club West will host a "Sugar 'N Spice" 
brunch on Monday, April 20 from 10:45 a.m. 
to 12:45 p.m. at Grand Affairs, 2036 East 
Pleasure House Rd. Emily Clarke, a mother 
of four, will share "How to thrive and not 
]as^siSvlve.j::oSLi&^.SO tnclUSive with a 
complimentary nursery to age 10. Brunch 
and nursery reservations are necessary. Call 
Gail 499-5243, or Virginia, 424-8112, fw 
reservations by April 16. 



Garden tour 

The Hardwick Chamber Ensemble will 
perform at the Francis Land House Historic 
Site and Gardens in celebration of Virginia's 
Historic Garden Week on Tuesday, April 21. 
Presented as part of the Virginia Beach 
Garden Tour, the music will feature duos and 
trios by classical composers and will be 
continuous from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. The 
performance will be funded in part by the 
Virginia Beach Arts and Humanities 
Commission. Admission to tour the historic 
house is by Virginia Beach Garden Tour 
block ticket. The concert is free of charge. 
Call 431-4000 for information. 



Craft fair 

Applications are now being accepted fw 
the Historic Lynnhaven House Craft Faire to 
be held Nov. 14-15. Applications will be 
accepted through July 1. For further 
information call, 427-1587. The Lynnhaven 
House is located on 4405 Wishart Rd. near 
Haygood Shopping Center, and the 
intersection of Haygood/Wishart roads and 
Independence Boulevard. 



Spring tea 



The Lynnhaven House's Spring Tea Party 
features a colonial fashion show and a tour 
of the Lynnhaven House on Saturday, Ajwil 
25 at 1:30 p.m. The tea includes dainty 
sandwiches, delicious teas and wonderful 
sweets. Space is limited and reservations are 
required. Cost is $7 per person fot ag(» 12 
and iq}- Call 464-2041 for information and 
re^rvadons. The tea will be on the gnn»k 
of the Lynnhaven House, located 4405 
Wi^ivt Rd. 



Technolo^ fair 

The Trantwobd Elementary School PTA 
will pv^nt a night of challenging fun oi 
Tuesday, April 21 at 7 p.m. AowcMing 
today's advanced technology. Ttattwood 
students and their families will have a 
chance to s^rch the Inumet, try out the 
Navy's night vision glasses, experience l»w 
police track criminals and learn how 
fireflghters search for victims in heavy 
smdce. The two-tour event wiU tidce place in 
the Khool cafet»ia and ^nmasium. 





Operating budget passes billion 
dollar mark, fully funds schools 



Education referendum with 
tax increase part of plan 



By Lee Cahill 

City Council Reporter 

For the first time the operating budget, 
if approved as proposed for fiscal year 
1998-99, will reach the billion dollar 
mark and beyond and represents a 4.5- 
percent increase over the 1997-98 
operating budget, 

Otherwise, the budget proposed by 
City Manager James K. Spore at a 
special City Council meeting Tuesday 
has no surprises, acknowledges no crises, 
requires no real estate tax rate increase — 
the current rate is $122 per SlOO 
valuation, has no increases in other 
taxes, and fully-funds the budget 
approved by the School Board. 



1997 record 
tourism year 
at the Beach 

Study says that 
economic impact 
surpassed $1 billion 

By Aune Kirk 

Correspondent 

Officials of the Virginia Beach 
Department of Convention and Visitor 
Development weren't dancing on the 
boardwalk last week, but they were pretty 
pleased wten a study from Old Dominion 
University revealed 1997 as a eecordycar 
for tourism in the city. 

The total economic impact of the resort 
industry to the region amounted to more 
thanSl billion last year, according to the 
study conducted by ODU's Bureau of 
Research. 

Virginia Beach also received a 43 
percent return on its annual tourism 
investment. Reports showed the city had 
$29 million in expenditures and S41.4 
million in tax revenue, yielding a S12 
million direct return on their investment. 

"It's hard to improve on good news," 
said Dr. Gilbert R. Yokum, chairman of 
ODU's Department of Economics. "It 
was a record yrar." 

It is unique that Virginia Beach reports 
its visitor-generated expenditures in trams 
of direct revenues, Yokum said. The 
revenue, whk;h comes from city taxes on 
visitor accommodations, dining and 
amusements, provides a valid 
measurement of net direct dollar return- 
on-investment made by the city. 

ODU's study coincided with statistics 
compiled by the Virginia Beach 
Department of Convention and Visitor 
Development that showed all economic 
indicators up over 1996. 

A record 2.5 million people visited 
Virginia Beach last year and occupied 
2,214,333 rooms city wide. They pushed 
hotel sales up by 8 percent, totaling 
$150.6 million and increased restaurant 
sales 5 percent to S473.2 million. Direct 
visitor spending, which amounted to 

Sm 1997, Pag* 8 



The budget also includes an amount 
equal to 3 percent of payroll for salary 
increases for city employees and three 
percent of payroll for increases in school 
employee compensation. 

The $1,009,472,234 budget is within 
the city's means, said E. Dean Block, 
director of management and budget, and 
will allow the city to maintain services 
that the city of 442,244 (the populau'on 
projected for 1999) will require. 

The Capital Improvement Program 
(CIP), which with the operating budget 
make up 'ne city's resource management 
plan, iicludes new appropriation 
authorit' over the six-year program of 
$599,151,773 for a total budget of 



$1,188,995,484. 

The new appropriation authority 
represents an 8.7-percent iiKrease over 
tlw 1997-98 new appro[»iation suthority. 

Under a financial plan proposal in the 
budget, the November school bond 
referendum will require a four cent real 
estate tax increase rather than the wiginal 
5.3 percent needed to finance the $132.8 
million needed for the school 
construction program outlined by the 
schools. 

Rather than placing the total $132.8 
million on the referendum, the city 
would have an S84 million referendim 
and finance part of the program with 
other sources — $5.1 million from the 
1997-98 school surplus reversion and 
$43.7 million from the city's charter 
bond authority over the six-year CIP 
paiod. 

The referendum may be reduced even 
further if the GetBral Assembly provides 



school «mstnK;tion funds. 

AUo, the school constnK;tion review 
committee last week noted in its report 
that the figures first presented by the 
kIkm! system cmi possibly be r«)u(^ by 
10 pCTcent. 

The school {vogram will include the 
renovati(»i and/or recwistruction of 18 
elementary schools to bring them up to a 
prototype. The council, ^cording to 
Block, may want to make the decision on 
the size of the referendum after the budget 
is adofjied on May 12 but before June 30 
whkh will still allow tinie for informing 
the public ifwior to the referendum. 

After years of uncertainty over the Lake 
Gaston water supply project and the 
future of the Oceana Naval Air Station, 
causing die city to be overcautious ^XHit 
spending, the resource plan recommends 
the increase in the per c^iladebt limit 

SM0PERATINC,Pag«4 



Scuba enthusiasts take the plunge, 
— literally — for 24-hour fund- raiser 

Dive for A Cure nets 
$10,000 for cancer 
research, education 



By Matthew Shanley 

CofresDondent 

The feet of David Widen and Jeff 
Eubank spoke volumes about theii 
belief in the Dive for A Cure fund- 
raiser for the American Cancer 
Society. 

More than 24 hours after they haj 
donned scuba gear and entered the 
chlorinated pool at 1413 N. Great 
Neck Road, the pair emerged to the 
applause of more than a dozen well- 
wishers and other divers, in part 
because the event brought in moit; 
than $10,000 for the organization, 
surpassing last year's $8,000 total at 
3:30 a.m. Saturday. 

Both men seemed fine after the day- 
long underwater adventure, except for 
their feet, which suffered from 
exposure to the 92-degree water and 
from being encased in the Neqirene 
boots used to protect the toes aid 
ankles from chafing. 

Normally, flippers are attached to 
the end of the boot, but in this case, 
both men went without. Eubank and 
Widen came out of the 60,000-gaIlon 
heated indoor pool sporting tender, 
shriveled feet of an unearthly pink 
color. 

Eubank, a Virginia Beach resident, 
also experienced a stomach problem at 
3 a.m. Saturday morning that persisial 
throughout the dive despite a dosetrf 
Maalox. 

Both men said the effort was waih 
it, though "getting t6o bored and 
being able to sleep" were Widen's 
main concerns. 

The C^^apeakeman and his partner 
spent no more than 15 minutes on 
land at any one time, and were 
underwater for as long as two hours 
and 15 minutes before coming to the 




MAKING A SPLASH. Virginia Beach residents and WorreU Brathen employ- 
ees Denise Montini, wi dedt. and Margarita lait, in watw, wtre amoi^ the 
many scuba enthusiaste who participated In an underwater feat to raise 
money for the American Cancer Society. 



surface for food or a quick trip to the 
bathroom. 

Unlike most of the more than 200 
divers who came and went in two- to 
three-hour shifts, however, Witten anl 
Eubank said they wanted to go the 
distance. 

"I think we're both hard-headed 
pcqile," Widen said of Eubank, his 
friaid of three years. "We both set a 



^ and did it" 

The money from the Dive for a Cure 
will be collected along with other 
funds raised by teams who sponsored 
divers during the scuba-thon and go 
toward the American Cancer Society's 
Relay For Life May 30-31 at Little 
Credc Amphibious Etiase. 

Sm fund-raisers. Page 8 



Vigil remembers ttie tiniest victims 




Children of abuse, neglect have 
advocate volunteers on their side 



SOLEMN CEREMONY. Rows of c«n«M r^^Mied At 
MMw who M^red abiwe and neglect at the han* ef 
»^«ri toil 3^r. A ceram e iiy at ^ Itol Mud «« 
vmMor MofMh acttiMn. 



iOfMrgl^ 
pWMis aM 



By Aura Kiric 

CorresDondent 

It should not hurt to be child. But it 
hurt tremendously fw 1,018 chiktoi who 
were neglected or abused in Han^Ntm 
Roads last year. For 17 of tfiosc 
children, the hurting is over wk) they will 
no longer suffer. 

They are dsd— deadby hands of their 
motlwr, father, a mother's boyfriend, an 
uncle and other adults who could not 
diffi^ti^ bctwcCT big w littte, chiW ex 
tMt, hurt or discipline. 

In recognition of these children, a 
qjKtal candlelight vigil was held at the 
steps of Virginia Beach'sCity Hall laa 
w«k. Participanu held white roses aid 
^J«wl Wue riblKMU as rows of (^Kfl« 
»wc lighted recognizing the ctteg(xies(tf 

Gold was fw physical abu^, white for 



lack of supervisitm, green for physical 
neglect, teal for mental abuse aid 
burgundy for sexual abuse. Two 
candelatwas holding 15 red camfl^ 
r«i»mberedthe children who died in tte 
ar^, and two purple candles for the 
chiltfren who di^ in Virginia B^ch stood 
at the up tte stairs. 

"The (andlesrepre^nt fomdedca^ cf 
neglect ami ^vse," said Edith Duggan, 
cxecutiw diraKM- Virginia Bc^h Court 
Appointed Special Advocue (CASA) 
program. 'There are many more out 
diere liw ^ unrepofted." 

AeCOnllag to Duggan, diU 
aiwse is a Mtional ^oUem thu cutt 
aooss all nciil ukI ecmomic lines. To 
rect^i^ tte pnri»tem. Afnil has teei 

SM\m»L,f%|^g 



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f^i^mm^ 



HPa«iWW« 



■iP 



2 Virginia Beach Sun. Friday, April 3, 1998 




TORNADO SEASON ALERT 

Know the facts and prep^F§- 

Tornadoes are spectacular, awesome — and 
deadly. 

Two years ago 24 tornadoes were reported 
In Virginia, four times the average of six a 
year. One person was injured when two 
tornadoes plowed through parts of Fairfax 
and Loudoun counties destroying six homes, 
damaging dozens of others and knocking out 
power for up to a week In some areas. Later 
that year twin tornadoes in the wake of 
Hurricane Bertha injured nine people in 
Northumberland County and severely 
damaged or destroyed 20 mobile homes. 

And who can forget the horrific scenes of 
destruction in 1993, when the most 
tornadoes — 18 — struck Virginia in one day. 
Four people were killed and more than 200 
injured when twisters struck the cities of 
Petersburg. Hopewell and Colonial Heights. 

Hampton Roads can no longer be lured into 
a false sense of safety. Last year Tidewater 
saw its own share of twisters, from water 
spouts to the tornado that tore through 
South Norfolk causing millions of dollars In 
damages. 

According to the National Weather Service, 
tornadoes can hit anywhere at any time. 
Proof? As early as January one was reported 
in Southeast Virginia. But tornado season is 
April through October, with twisters typically 
striking between 3 and 9 p.m. Always born 
out of severe thunderstorms, tornadoes can 
be stationary or travel at speeds of up to 90 
miles per hour. 

When severe thunderstorms threaten, the 
National Weather Service (NWS) advises 
people to watch the sky and pay close 
attention to weather advisories. 

Knowing simple safety rules and taking 
immediate action can save your life: 

■ The best shelter from a tornado Is a 
basement. If you don't have one, go to a room 
without windows nearest the center of the 
house or lowest level of the house. 

■ Avoid windows. Opening windows to 
equalize pressure is ineffective in reducing 
damage during a tornado. 

■ Mobile homes are extremely unsafe. Seek 
shelter elsewhere. 

■ If you are caught In an open building like 
a shopping mall, get into the restroom. 

■ If you are outside when a tornado strikes, 
try to find shelter immediately in the nearest 
substantial building. If no buildings are close, 
lie flat in a ditch or other ground depression. 

■ Finally, if you are in your car. get out and 
try to find shelter. A bridge underpass, 
culvert or ditch can all provide shelter. 

Remember, know the facts and be prepared. 
— V.E.H. 



BEST 



MISLEADING 

SOLE 



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MY PRESS 
SECRETARY 
MY TEAM OP 
LAMVEDS/ 
AND MOST 

OPAIX, 
THE 

ECONOHV. 





Fax your letter to ttie editor, 548-0390. 



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Virginia's mental health is on the brink 



By Scott Bates 

At this very moment, more than 
4,000 Virginians are in mental 
health institutions run by the 
commonwealth of Virginia. The 
patients are someone's brother, 
sister, mother or friend. They fixs 
time having to deal with in many 
cases debilitating mental illnesses 
and addictions that rob them of 
their grip on reality. 

In addition to the state 
institutions, there are 40 
community service boards that 
monitor the care for the mentally 
ill, mentally retarded and 
chemically addicted Virginians who 
have sought treatment. These 
boards have been a link between 
localities and the state bureaucracy 
to ensure care for consumers of 
mental health care. 

It has not been a perfect system 
and it certainly is costly. Virginia 
spends, including federal Medkaid 
dollars, approximately $850 
million a year on the care of the 
mentally ill, mentally retarded and 
those with substance abuse 
problems. TTiousands of Virginian 
families have benefited from the 
mental health care assistance fifom 
the state. 

Before leaving office, fcxmer 
Gov. George Allen put in motion a 
plan to close state mental health 
institutions and put thousands of 
the mentally ill into the 
"community." The main problem 
with the Allen plan is that there is 
no mandatory funding mechanism 
to provide the care that these folks 
need. 

The state will wash its hands of 
the matter and there is no guarantee 
that funds will be turned over to 
local communities who will be on 
the front lines of care for the 



The families for the 
mentally ill and 
mentally retarded 
need to know that 
their loved ones 
are receiving 
quality care and 
are not seen as a 
line item. 



mentally ill. 

"FormerGov. Allen's plan is an 
act of political cowardice," said 
Joseph Haynes, former Virginia 
Commissioner for Mental Health, 
Mental Retardation and Substance 
Abuse Services. 

"This plan is punitive on the 
consumers of mental health 
services and their families," said 
Haynes. "We need to invest in 
people, not pull the rug out from 
under them." 

Haynes' problem with the 
AIleii/Gilmoreplan is based on the 
abrogation of state responsibility 
for the care of the mentally ill and 
mentally retarded. With no 
guarantee of state funds to 
community based treatment, the 
closing of state mental healds 
facilities and release of patients 
could have profound impacts on 
neighborhoods across the 
commonwealth. 

The families for the mentally ill 
arul mentally retarded need to know 
that their loved ones are receiving 
quality care and are not seen as a 
line item in a budget that needs to 



be cut to give tax cuts to peqjle 
who drive shiny BMWs. The lest 
of a civilization is how it treats its 
very young, its very old aid 
infirm. 

Mental illness and mental 
retardation cruelly rob patients of 
part of their identity and place great 
burdens on even the most loving 
and supportive families. What is 
needed is a plan to make sure 
patients are treated as individuals 
and receive the care they need. 

Fortunately there is such a plan 
in the works. Delegate Frank Hall 
(D-Richmond) wrote and passed a 
bill in this session of the G^ieral 
Assembly that is the First revision 
of the law governing Virginia's 40 
community based mental heidth 
boanls since the 1960s. The bill, 
awaiting Gov. Gilmore's signature, 
would: 

■ Require that the board assign 
care managers to identify the 
treatment each person needs and 
And the services in the commimity. 
Currently law provides only that 
boards provide emergency care. 

■ Impose new standards &x 
board membership and directors. 
One third of each board must be 
comprised of consumers of mental 
health services and their family 
membos. 

Directors would have to meet 
minimum competency 
requirements. Boards will have to 
provide a more thorough 
accounting of their expenditereof 
state funds. 

Hall's bill is a sensible response 
for a continuing commitment to 
the care of the mentally ill and 
mentally retarded in Virginia. Will 
Gilmore help Virginia meet the 
test (tf a civilized society? 



Fashion focus has Oscar appeal 




And the Emmyforbestavy^ffd show 
of the year goes to...the OscarsI 

If you're like me you're one of the 
millions who sat enraptured through 
three and a half hours of glitz and 
glamour last 
wedc to see 
not only 
what 
Hollywood's 
brightest 
were wear- 
ing, but also 
thehonwees, 
the shenani- 
gans and ibs 
heartbreak. 

My only 
disappoint- 
ment was 
that Peter 
Fonda 
("Ulee's 
Gold") or 
Robert 
Duval fThe 
Ap(mte") didn't tdce hfxne the best 
actor tn^y. Smiling Jack Nicholsm 
got the prize fcr ckung what comes 
naturally to him — acting totally 
nutso. CcNisdo' "Oie F^v OvCT tiK 
Cuckoo's Nea" anl "The Shining." 
Need I say more? 

My Acatony AvMffd vkwt^ be- 
pn a fiill tw) tons beCne te 1^ 
^w. At 7 pjii. El agned m widi 
J(mi Rivers and ha (taJthua" going 
^ga o^^ gowns and je wels, hainto's 
and hair <kNi'ts. Every $m, mate ot 
female, w^ gre^sd widi a mx3x>- 
phme in the Ugx and ^ked, "Who 
dkly(wrdies(hix»k3}aiKl^weby?" 
M first it «^s cute. But I must 
admit di« after Mo hoots te^pi^y 
^tsBom. StiO, I co^ta't nop <^v 
HollywoMl't leading ladiei and 
hi^cs, tooknx oh to ^^M in die 



Off The 
Cuff 

By Victoria 
Hecht, editor 



gOwns, uixedos and upswept coits. 

I decided to give my own vo^on 
of the Oaar — "the Vicky" fw best- 
dressed folks. They 're sure to make it 
onto Ken Blackwell's best-dre^ed 
list in 1998. 

First the fashion do's. 

Though I'm nota big Minnie Driver 
("Good WiU Hunting") fan, I believe 
the dark-haired Brit looked stunning 
in h» red, slightly asymetrical off- 
the-shoulder number. Her ringlets 
cascaded over sleek shouldo^, and 
she wore one large jeweled Ivacd^ 
Even if she didn't take home the 
OSes' for best supporting actress, her 
fashion acumen was a real winner. 

Best dress«! male is a tc»s up, 
mostly because I'm mit a tuxedo 
aff«;tkMiado. 

Howev», I thought M^ Dmum 
("Good Will HunUng") k)oked par- 
ticulariy handsome. RoUn WilliMis 
(same movie — boy diat flick did 
«^ll) was fiso a mmna ^ he ac- 
cepted die best supporting actor 
smmA. Ik ^ts a Vicky, too, hq[>e- 
Ailly to mdce up for all tlKse tmm he 
got shafted at die Acatfemy Awaids 
("Dead Poet: Society" in jHrticula- 
comes to mind). 

outers diat tocric my Ixeath away 
were "Kiss die Girls'" Ashley Judd 
(even if ta' dr^i was slit up to you 
kMW wtee) and Helena Btmham 
Cma ("Wiap of die Dove") in a 
lovely lavoider nwnba. Wi^ ha 
pocelain pale drin, diis English 
bei^ is 8 real tead hffner. 

I dKM^t die tad fs- oMw^gted 
the ^lod wten it csiw U) ckxinig at 
dus ycffl-'i awffd cwciwmy. Seiwsid 
(tan'ts cotm immediMdy to mimi. 

Wlnte I Kbnin Y^^m Ihait fAs 
(%»d As ItOeis") tor hs-bestacnen 
p^foimM^, ter tasie in gowns 



leaves miKh to be (tesired. The poor 
wcrnien kmked anorexic, and die pale 
sadn dress she wore squashed wh^ 
litde shape she had in a most awk- 
ward way. 

Sigoumey Weava''s hairdo was 
die worst of die evening. I h(^ no 
one spent hours on it, be(^use it looked 
like ^e got her head stuck in a ceiling 
fan. Normally, she'safashionqu^n, 
but in diis case? Not! 

Not much needs to be said about 
Madonna. As usual she looked like 
sonttthing die cat dragged in with her 
scraggly hair and ill-planned dress. 

A no-no also goes to Kate Winslet 
('Titanic"), whose performance was 
iKjminaied for best stress in a lead- 
ing role. The gown she wore lodced 
i^raiglttdf an (MWe^on movie set 
Even Evai ad^. "Who's diat girl 
widi die heaving bosom?" 

I normally think Kim Basinger 
("LA Confidential") is a stumier, but 
a pale green die^, slash of r^ lip- 
aick «dA '2(h hairA) m^fe iKr lo^ 
plain aitfn»dy. Susm Sar»d«i, oa& 
of my bvoite actre^es, was filing 
Out (^ to ultta-tow-cut gown. 

While die 1998 Academy Awwd 
stow may be remembered tot its ups 
and downs, oomk, antics of Billy 
Crystal and a big \)css who stole die 
show, die fashitms ws« Ivgely 
unn^nxxiriile. 

Tl» highligfat of my e^wiing was 
8eea^ChCT(iwvgowtod is > y p o i nt) 
AnitWNBidioaBodd-kxA^clwn- 
pape-cctoed dre» Witt hnge h»d- 
p^e Mop hs h»d. T!k ai^toi (rf 
Ae te Mde hs look lite La^ Lib- 
aty. 

So tfutt'g it from die inv^ brii- 
ion reporter. Undl next ytm wh^ 
die wn (tf die silva scre^ 1^ ^ 
die snail screen, keep yoa fiiAta 
s^s^ ditfpei^d. 




The Real 
World 

By B.J. Ses- 
sions, senior col- 
umnist. 



Springer's 'no 
limits' goes 
just too far 

It may come as a surprise to some, 
but columnists do read odier colum- 
nists' works. I have die same routine 
each week. I read my own column 
first and dien 
I read the 
other col- 
umns. I must 
say that I was 
somewhat 
surprised, 
but pleased, 
as I read my 
dear friend 
and col- 
league Dr. 
Raymond 
Jones' col- 
umn "Con- 
tinuum" in 
last week's 
Chesapeake 
— — — — Post. 

I say diis 
because over 
die years that I have known Ray, 
I have found him to be a compassimi- 
ate, city-loving, intelligent gendcmen 
who very seldom ever criticizes any- 
diing or anybody unless die situation 
is really bad. He would rather praise 
dian criticize. Tliis week he took on 
the Jerry Springer smut show. 

For diose who have never seen it, 
it's in die same category as Howard 
Stem and die old Geraldo Rivera 
slime. Rivera would bring in a bunch 
of dimwits and put them against each 
odier. They would throw chairs, cuss 
and hit each odier. Fortunately dur- 
ing one of the melees, Rivera was hit 
in die face widi a chair and his nose 
was broken (too bad it wasn't his 
neck). It wasn't bng after diat he 
claimed diat he saw die error of his 
ways and now claims to have ahtgher 
level show. 

Springer has no limits on what is 
allowed on his show. They come 
ready to fight and some appear to be 
druidc or on drugs. Springer provdces 
diem, and when die going gets rough, 
he runs for cover like die coward diat 
he is. It would be nice if he got caught 
up in die crossfire and got his big 
beek busted like Rivera. He must 
have a big following — his is the 
number one watched talk show on 
daytime television. 

Jones says, "I hq)e Mr. Springer's 
litde effon dies a computer's death, 
garbage in, garbage out" 

I hope so, but I'm not sure dut is 
going to happen.Oir country is lead- 
erless and we have a president who 
speaks widi no moal authority what- 
soever. As long as it remains diat 
way, the Jerry Springers of die worid 
will continue to flourish. The hly- 
livered politicians are afraid to con- 
demn the Jerry Springer filth lest 
diey be accused of interference widi 
free speech. 

Wehave 1 1-and 13-year-oIdchil- 
dren killing odier chikiren. Thoe have 
been diree school shootings in recent 
months. Don't kid yourself, children 
watch die Jerry Springer show and 
see grown u|» cussing and fighting 
and trying to hurt each odier. 

There is so much hatred displayed 
on die Springer show. I have been 
writing about the smut peddlers ova- 
die years, and it makes me feel good 
to know that my friend, Raymond 
Jones, feels die same way. Thanks 
Ray. 
Welcome to die real world. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

P.O. Box 1327 
1024 North Battlefteld Blvd. 

Chesapeake, Vs. 23320 

TekpkoBc: (757) 547-^71 

(USPS«60-1«Q 

PoUMer 
HaneiByeriy 

Gtaeral Mm^r 
RonMbnot 

EdMoral SnpervlMr 
Jmie Brown 

Edttor 
Victoria Hecht 

Bittiiiess Maaagcr 

Ui^Wud 

CoBpodltaii 

LorettaLonax 

The Virginia Beach Sun is pub- 
MdMd ev«y Friday 1^ Byerly nifafica- 
tions. Inc., 1000 Armory EHive, 
I^siklin. Virginia 23851. Periodk^ 
poAage paid in Irmklin, Vkpmtmd 
additional ouiy ofBces. Pimm^en 
So^ addrea diai^a 10 1000 Aramy 
Drhre, i^mldm, Vvguua 23851. Sri>- 
mqukm Raiea: By nuO «d>famet 
wWn 40 nyks of Vvpnui &«*. 
Va., one yat, $15.95, tira yeoi, 
$28.95. Vk^nia nd ^k«h Cwite, 
me y^, $17.85, two yem, ^.50. 
AO odiR itatet one yen. S24.00^ two 
yeea. $38 JO. PsyMe m advasM. 

Otter Byerly AMctfow newi- 
P^sb: The Chn^eriee Poet, 1^ 
Pmtnouth Iwa, Tke Tidewsis 
News.l^eBimitnde'nnee-GNM^ 
The Imi^imStm M«i«^f, The 

Ms^or. 



wmmmmmm 



MHi 



Virginia Beach Sun, Friday, April 3, 19^ 3 



April Fool's Day 
traditions no jolte 




The 

Mayor's 

Report 

Mayor Meyera 
Oberndorf 



April 1st is considered to be April 
Fool's or All Fool's Day. It is a day of 
practical jokes and high humor. Cel- 
ebrations during this time may have 
their origin in 
the fi^t that 
the 1st of 
April marks 
the end of the 
spring equi- 
nox, a poinf 
at which 
nightandday 
are of equal 
length all 
over the 
world. 

The origin 
ofthecustom 
of playing 
tricks and 
practical 
jokes on this 
particular 
' day is uncer- 

tain but it 
seems to have 
come from France as a result of a 
change to the Gregorian calendar in 
1582 when New Years' was moved 
from April 1 to January 1. Thus, the 
first April fools may have been people 
who failed to make the proper adjust- 
ment. It is also believed that since 
April 1 coincides with the zodiac 
sign of the fish, the French call it 
Fooling the April Fish Day. Some 
practices over the world are: 

■ France - On this day, school 
children stick paper cutouts of fish on 
their classmates' backs. Both the day 
and the dupes are called "Aiffil fish." 

■ Gnmany - April Fools* Day 
jdces and pranks are popular. The 
pranksters cry, "April, April" when 
someone is caught. 

■ Great Britain • Pranks are played 
on this day and dupes are sent for 
"left-handed screwdrivers" orstriped- 
painL" However, the pranking can 
last only until noon. After that you 
tell anyone causing a prank, "April 
Pools' Day's past and gone. You're 
the fool for making one." 

■ New Zealand - The time for 
playing pranks is only until noon on 
April 1. After noon, you say: "April 
Fool's Day is past 

And you're the April Fool at last 

Four Farthings make a penny 
„ ^yau'reabigger/ool than any." 
., 11, S|cw4in*via - A, non-church 
holiday — and there is a little verse: 

"April, April, you silly fish. 

I can trick you however I wish." 

■ Scotland - April 1 is known as 
"Huntigowk Day." It is a day for 
playing pranks and the name comes 
from the familiar prank of sending 
someone to "hunt the gowk another 
mile." Someone is sent on an errand 
bearing a message that says, "Don't 
you laugh and don't you smile. Hunt 
thegowkanothermile."The receiver, 
who is in (Ml the joke, reads it and tells 
the bea^r that this is the wrong place, 
sending him on. Thus the fool "hunts 
the gowk another mile" until he 
catches on. 

■ Sweden - If you are in Sweden 
on AiHil 1, be {H^pared to be fooled 
by young and old alike. This is the 
day that "anything goes." Children 
try all kinds of ways to fool the 
grownups and when the ruse is dis- 
covered, they hear this verse: 



The origin of the 
custom of playing 
tricks and practical 
jokes on this 
particular day is 
uncertain but it 
seems to have 
come from France. 



"April, April, you silly fish 
I can fool you as I wish." 
So people beware and remember 
this morning as you leave home, to- 
day, "anything goes." 
Information Bulletin: 
There are so raaiy things going on 
in the city for your participation in 
April, I thought it would be benefi- 
cial to list the ones I know about: 

■ April 4-5, The Spring Board- 
walk Auto Expo is a vintage and 
antique car, truck and motorcycle 
show. All vehicles will line the board- 
walk fcff this one-of-a-kind event that 
takes place on the famous Virginia 
Beach Boardwalk. Cash prizes will 
be awarded to "Best in Show." This 
event is free and open to the public. 
For more information call Beach 
Events, 491 -SUNN. 

■ April 11-12, Easter 
Eggstravaganza is at the 24th Street 
Park. Festivities will include puppet 
shows performed by Spectrum Pup- 
pets, face pain ting, games, pony rides, 
a moonwalk and the Easter bunny. 
All events are free and open to the 
public. For more informabon call 
Beach Events, 491 -SUNN. 

■ April 18, TTie Grand Chapter of 
Royal Arch Masons in Virginia will 
be sponsoring a 5K walk to benefit 
the eight regional chapters in Vir- 
ginia of the Alzheimer's Associa- 
tion. The walk begins on the board- 
walkat 10a.m. Contact Wayne Flwa, 
427-1822. 

■ April 18-19, Spring Wine Festi- 
val • Visitors may sample an interna- 
tional selection of wines whileenjoy- 
ing musical entertainment and ocean- 
front views at the 24th Street Park. 

■ April 18-25, Virginia Beach 
hosts this week-long tour in conjunc- 
tion with the popular statewide event, 
Historic Garden Week. Visitorsspend 
a leisurely (ky visiting some of Vir- 
ginia Beach 's loveliest resictences and 
gardens, from charming oceanfront 
cottages to stately historic homes. 
For ticketed admission call Mrs. 
Gewge D. Stephens, 428-3402, or 
Mrs. Edward T. Miles, 425-7523. 

■ April 21-22, Virginia Beach 
Senior Olympics at the Great Neck 
Ra;reation Center. 

■ April 26, First Landing Com- 
memoration at the First Land Park on 
Fort Story, 340-2342. 

■ April 26, March of Dimes 
Walkamerica - Walk to help prevent 
birth defects. Assembly is at the 24th 
and 25th Street parks at 7 a.m.; the 
walk begins at 8 a.m. rain or shine. 
For more information call Ron 
Tucker. 486-1001. 



Suspects sought in double 
bank robberies at Beach 



Viipnia Beach police are looking 
for anned rt^bcry suspects and we 
need your help. 

On Saturday, March 7 at about 7 
pjn. and again on Thursday, March 
12 at about 
7:15 p.m., 
two different 
tdbbemsoc- 
curred at the 
CrestarBank 
at 711 First 
Cotonial Rd. 
On March 
7,twop«qto 
were m^i^ 
a night de* 
posit when 
they were 
confronted 
by a man with 
8 handgun 
who de- 
manded the 
deposit bag. 
Afto^ gMing 
the deposit 
he 




Crime 
Solvers 

By Det. Ike 
Caakwell, Vir- 
ginia Beach Po- 
lux DepartmeiU 



jumped tte imx and fted ttewea. 

C^ ^toch I2.apef»9n w^m^ng 
a 1^^ depMt whsi diey v^R «m- 
ftoaed ^ two fflffl, tme with a ^nd- 
goi. Ttey (taMMded die (^nsit big. 
Hwy i(»^tped te faK% Mxi &d 
ttear^. 

Thewqj^tsvetfiraeMckaute, 
23 ^ncAi, 5-fiM-6-iiKA@ M. mi 




Up close and personal 

Hoanne Watson: iHeart and home 



By Victoria H0cht 

Editor 

Joanne Batson is one of the fortunate few 
who has always had the perfect job to fit her 
abilities and interests. 

At 26, she started her own publishing 
business and founded Greensville (S.C.) 
Woman magazine. In 1991, she became 
executive direeter of the Greensville, S.C. 
YWCA. 

A few years later Batson moved home to 
her native Virginia, where she got a job as 
financial development director for the 
Tidewater Chapter of the American Red 
Cross. Today she's pursuing another interest 
— healthy lifestyles. 

Five months ago Batson joined the 
American Heart Association (AHA) as vice 
president of field services for eastern 
Virginia. The region covers everywhere 
between the Eastern Shore to the east, 
Franklin to the west and YoA County to the 
north. The office is located in Vii^inia 
Beach. 

"I did the classic American dream 
backward," she said. "I think it's my 
upbringing — no guts, no glory." 

As one of two daughters, Batson was 
"taught that we could do anything we 
wanted to do" by a father who taught his 
daughters to fish and play poker. She 
describes her mother as a "pillar of strength . 
and the good role model" who kept them 
grounded. Summers were spent in 
Deltaville, where the only summer apparel 
that Batson and her sister needed were 
bathing suits. 

"We were water babies," she laughed "I 
was white-haired and black from the sun. 
Dad had a little boat for me. Now that we're 
back here I look at the water every day." 

As a fun, fearless female, Batson is used 
to taking risks. Starting her own magazine 
certainly was one, as was moving to 
Hampton Roads and taking a job in fund- 
raising with the Red Cross. Her duties are 
similar with the AHA. She was particularly 
attracted to the association because she 
could see where the funds were really 
making a difference. She said also that 
every family is touched by heart disease. 

Right now, with the Heart Ball behmd 
her, Batson is gearing up for another fiind- 
raising effort — Cardiac Arrest. 

"We're doing it a little different this year. 
We're actually having Cardiac Arrest within 
eastern Virginia all on the same day. May 
14. We're looking for volunteers and have 
something for everyone to do," she said. 

One of Batson 's goals is to help the AHA 
get a permanent exhibit at the Children's 
Museum of Virginia. It would include a 
gigantic heart that youngsters could wander 
through and a station where they could find 
out morie about heart-healthy lifestyles. 

Batson likes to practice what she 
preaches. She's op every mwning at 5:30 to 
exercise, and she's working to dispel the 
myth that heart disease and stroke/brain 
attack is only a problem among the older 
population. 

"Another problem is if you ask people if 
they have heart disease in their family and 
they say no. Then you come to find out one 
the parents died of stroke. They just don't 
connect stroke/brain attack with heart 
disease. There's still not enough education 
out there," she said. 

Name: Joanne Batson. 

What brought yoa to this area: It 

was time to come home. I left Virginia 
in 1971. 

Hometown: Richmond (winter) and 
Deltaville (summer). 



Age: 40-something. 

Nickname: Jo. 

Occupation: Vice President of Field 
Services, Eastern Virginia for the 
American Heart Association. Or, I raise 
money that is used to save lives. 

Marital Statua: Manied to my best 
friend, Phlip Rovner. also a fund-raiser. 
We don't get invited to many parties! 

Children: Two wonderful 
stepdaughters — HeWI, 20, a college 




sophomore, and Karyn, 26, an interior 
decorator. 

Favorite movies: I've enjoyed 
many, but "Fried Green Tomatoes" Is 
o/w I've enjoyed over and over. 

Magazines I read regularly: 

Usually whatever is available In places I 
have to wait. However, i subscribe to 
Chesapeake Bay and Coastal Living. 

Favorite authors: Margaret 
Truman, Patricia Comwell and Stephen 
King at the nroment. 

Favorite night on the town: 

Walking from our condo to dinner at 
one of the Colley Avenue restaurants, a 
movie at The Naro, coffee and dessert, 
and then walking home in the 
moonlight. 

Favorite restaurant: Happy Crab. 

Favorite meal and beverage: 

Lobster, asparagus or artichoke, 
strawberries with whipped cream and 
champagne. 

What most people don't know 
about myself: I did the American 
dream backward. I was an entrepreneur 
at 26, sokj my publishing company at 
40 and then went into the workforce. 

Best thing about myself: 

Hopefully, my desire to help young 
women reach their career goals. I was 
fortunate to have w>ndertul n^ntors: 

Worst habit: Overcommitment. 

Pets: None. 

Hobbles: My daddy taught me to fish 
and I still love it! Philip and I can walk 
out our front door and drop a line any 
time. 



Ideal vacation: Any place warm 
with beaches and great seafood. 
However, I love cruises, Key West and 
Sand Key. 

Pet peeves: When people are not on 
time. 

First job: During the summers I used 
my 7-foot bright red, custom-built boat 
to pole the shaltow waters in Deltaville to 
catch crabs to sell. 

Least liked Job: Working for DMV 
at 17. They gave me a job as a key 
puncher — and I couWnl type! 



Favorite sports teams: Old 

Dominion University Lady Monarchs and 
Furman Paladins. 

Favorite musicians: Jimmy Buffett, 
Nell Diamond, Barbra Streisand and 
The Four Tops to name a few. Can you 
tell I'm a Baby Boomer? 

Most emlmrrasslng moment: 

Wearing two different shoes to a state 
leadership conference in South 
Carolina. It was very early when I 
dressed. 



How I would like to be 
remembered: My dream is to have 
the time to conplete writing three books 
in progress. 

If I received $1 mllUon: Id take 
time off to write and make as many 
wishes as possible come true for my 
family and friends. 

If I had 10 minutes on national 
television: I wouW use five minutes to 
talk about the American Heart 
Association and give five minutes to my 
nephew, S«>tt, to play his nuisic. 



Chamber takes 'Disney Approach' to business 



Stepect 



1 90 pounds. One rDM)« «^ w^ffing 
a biadt knit cap, bliK j^ns and a 
nannel shirt. The ^wm! nA)bery pair 
— raiewarcapuf^ tan jacket and the 
otf^wweablack jacket anda^hat 
wiUi ear ftafs. 

CriflKSolvmwiU|»Qfupio$l.000 
fv nfinmu^Mi dxw this cam md 
my (Om crime. C^l 427-0000. As 
t^mtyt, you will rmnam tmmyoM^ 
Md 3KNI wilt HM haw qjp^ in ^wt 



Area enterprises 
can sign up for 
management 
seminar here 

For more than 25 years, Walt 
Disney W(vld Resort has aeaed 
"magic" for millions of gn^s 
frcmnraoKliteirafld. 

And while the I^riete Vacaion 
Kii^ANn is reec^izedby peo|fc 
of all ages as « place far 
unpanUeled entertainment nl 
hq^faiett, bosi^^ pad^mau^ 
^mk^mveitt m ttMMIat 
quiity i^vice. nun^SMat nd 



Since 1986, professionals have 
leanwlthe "Diaiey Ai^»ch"to 
tesiness ntd managemrat duoogh 
a series of multi-day, e3««udve 
^ucation programs presented by 
Walt Disney World. Now offered at 
Disney Institute, these propams 
use the 47-squffl«-mite Walt Disney 
World Resort as a model to 
showcase core concepts. 
phil(»(q>hies aid twJiniques 
Gntthsid. 

Now. business fs^ofessionals in 
Hamixon Reads ha\% the exclusi\% 
^xnmity to ^m many of diese 
same iNisii^ss p%:tices through a 
one-day seminar presented by 
Disney Institute and spomaci 
tocally by ibs HMi|Kon mo^ 
Ctenbs^ C^numtx. The ema. 
will be Mi btm 7:30 a.m. to 
12:30 p.m. April 14 at the 



Chesapeake Conference Center, 
900 Greenbrier Circte. 

"The Disney Keys to Semu 
ExccIlaKc"(^mthc ch«Keto see 
a side of the Walt Disney Worid 
Resort most |«ople Mver ^e — 
the busiitess sicte. Members of tfe 
Disney management team will 
present an insightful look at tt« 
topics of (wganizational creativity, 
managen^ and servi(». 

Throughout U»c program, 
atwid^s cxpl«e the management 
of the Wall Disney World Resort 
— which involves theme pules. 
wa» ^ks, entetaiim»ent districts, 
resort hotels, merchandise 
locatioi^, resaurms, irsis- 
puMta bdUlMS, utilities. 
natMeaaBce and more. The 
successful operation of diese 
diverw areas depends on die 



effective managemoiiof more than 
45.(^ Walt Disney WwW Resort 
"Cast Members" (Disi«y psteice 
foranplc^^. 

"With the popularity of our 
multi-day business seminars M 
Disney Institute, we've had many 
requests to take shorter 
presentations to ccxnmunities 
across the country," said Craig 
Taylor, director of busines 
programs for Disney Institute. 
"Through 'The Disney Keys to 
Service Excellence," ^tkipanls 
will hear Diaiey success sutm 
airf get a glimp^ of Ac suK^rful 
philosqjhics we practice thot^n^ 
of limes every day at the WA 
Disney WwM Resort" 

Fpr regisfrauon mtormatioi caU 
the Hampton Rdads Q^nb^'s 
R^«vaUa> HoUb«. 664-2558. 



mir^mmi 



^^^^'^^i^^^^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



4 Viigiiria Beach Sm, Fridi^. April 3. !9^ 




Center exhibit opens 



Award-winning children's audw 
David M. Schwartz will speak m 
Kempsville Elementary School rai 
April 6 at 9:30 a.m. He is the 
author of "How Much Is A 
Million?" "If You Made A 
Million,** "Supogrand^" andod^ 
tiUes. 

Princess Anne AARP Chq»er 
5119 meets at 1 p.m. Tuesdi^, 
April 14 at the Princess Anne 
Recreation Center, 1400 Farell 
Pkwy. The speaker will be Judy 
Jones of Founders Village. At 
12:30 p.m. the Virginia Beach 
Health Department will provide 
free blood [mMure tests. Call 430- 
2646 or 428-1984. 



Mother's Against I^nk Driving 
(MADD) Southside Community 
Action Team will be meeting 
Tuesday, April 7 at 6:30 p.m, at 
the Virginia Beach Central Liteary 
which is located at 4100 Virginia 
Beach Blvd. 



"From Remembrance to 
Renewal" opens April 16 at the 
Contemporary Art Center of 
Virginia and will be runs through 
June 14. An opening recq>tion 
will be held at the CAC on 
Sunday, April 19 from 3 to 5:30 
pan. 

This afternoon event features 
the Virginia premiere of the 1998 
Academy-nominated film. The 
"Long Way Home, narrated by 
Morgan Freeman. The film 
chronicles the plight of Holocaust 
survivors and their attempu to 
immipate to Palestine. 

In conjunction with "From 
Remembrance to Renewal," 
Second Wind will perform three 
original works: Kadosh, Winds 
and Heartbreak. Kadosh is a 
spiritual expression in dance, 
incorporating incense bumo's and 
Hebrew lyrics, while Winds 



traces the freedoms accorded to 
women in America through the 
generations. 

Thematically linked with 
Embedded Metaphor will be a 
fourth work, entitled Sleepless 
Nights. Following the 
performance, the dancers will 
engage the audience in a 
conversation about the works. 

By request, Second Wind will 
conduct a master class from 1 to 
2 p.m. following the performance. 
Cost is SS per student. Interested 
persons must register a minimum 
of IS students. 

Second Wind Dance Company 
is under the artistic direction of 
Beveriy Cordova Duane. 

For more information, call the 
Contemporary Art Center, 425- 
0000, or Second Wind Dance 
Compuiy, 547-2236. 



The Princess Anne Woman's 
Club of Vi^inia Beach will meet 
on Tuesday, April 14 at 11 a.m. at 
Tuidom's IHne lYee Irm. 



HOPE for Kids volunteers 
needed for campaign 



Catholic High Schools' fifUi 
annual Festival of the Arts is set 
for Sunday, April 26 from noon-6 
p.m. featuring all area CaUiolic 
schools, including tiementn:y- The 
event will be held at Catholic High 
School, 4552 I^inceis Anne Rd. 
Call 467-2881 for more 
Information. 



The Pickett-Buchanan Chapter 
United Daughters of the 
Confederacy will meet at 1 1 a.m. 
on April 16 at Cypress Point 
Country Club, 5340 Club Head 
Rd. in Virginia Beach. For 
information and reservations call, 
489-8340. The guest speaker will 
be Dr. John Davis, historian and 
Bttfaor. 



HOPE for Kids is seeking 400 
volunteers to spread inf(»matk)n 
about childhood immunizations and 
communicable diseases in six 
Hampton Roads cities on Saturday, 
April 18 as part of the gnxip's 
second annual Outreach 
Immunization Event. 

A project of HOPE waldwkle, 
HOPE for Kids ii a non-prctfit 
community outreach program with 
30,000 volunteers in 56 cities 
across the United States and Puerto 
Rico. The program came to 
Hampton Roads last April and 
distributed information on 
childhood immunizations and 
preventative diseases to more than 
3,500 families in Virginia Beach. 

This year, it will expand to 
include door^to-door visits in under 



Surroundings & Company 
Catering Service 

Presents the historical Obici Mansion. 

Wedding and Receptions. Corporate Events. 

Reunions and Anniversaries. Call Dan Field 

at 491-1862. 15 Minutes from Chesapeat^e, 

Norfolk and Portsmouth. 




served neighborhoods in Virginia 
Beach, Norfolk, Portsmouth, 
Chesiqjeake, Hampton and Newpoit 
News. 

Sponsored by Trigon 
Healthkcepers offered by Priority 
Health Care and Sentara Health 
System, the OuU'cich Event will 
kick off with a rally at 9 a.m, at 
Mount Trashmore. Mayors fn»n 
the six local cities involved in the 
outreach will sign a joint 
proclamation in support of 
National Immunization Week. 

The event, which lasts until 3 
p.m., will also feature fiee 
immunizations by the Virginia 
Beach Health Department, 
entertainment, HMO booths and a 
variety of children's activities. The 
volunteers will be deployed into 
the under served communities at 10 
a.m. to educate families on the 
importance of childhood 
immunizations, preventative health 
care and to connect families with a 
health care provider. 

Volunteers do not have to have 
prior health care training or 
knowledge about childhood 
immunizations. They must be at 
least 18 years old and will be 
required to attend a one-hour 
training session at 7 p.m. on April 
14 at the Kempsville Recreatiai 
Center in Virginia Beach. 

HOPE for Kids is working with 
the Consortium for Infant and 
Child Health (CINCH), Project 
Immunization Virginia (PIV), 
Social Services, Virginia Beadi 
Health Partners, Hampton and 
Portsmouth coalitions and the 
Virginia Beach Health Dq)artment 
to target neighborhoods in each 
city. 

To volunteer call Kim Versage, 

456-1547, 



Parents group keeps PEACE, 
reducing youth violence 




By Margaret WIndley 

QofresDondenl 

Adolescent violence is not 
necessarily something 
happening somewhere else to 
somebody else's chilcben. 

It's not the special preserve 
of any social or economic class 
or any area of the country. 

It is a possible danger to all 
segments of society, 

Jolted by 
the recent 
events in 
Jonesboro, 
Ark. but en- 
ergized by 
Uieir own 
children's 
experience, 
several 

parents , ._i™, 
attended ^"^^ 

a presentation last week at the 
Mount Trashmore YMCA to 
learn about 
P.E.A.C.E.KEEPERS, a YMCA 
program that could offer their 
children guidance in finding 
non-violent solutions to their 
problems and in growing up 
maturely. 

It is also open to {MUents and 
interested adults who want to 
become involved in making 
their communities safer and 
will train them in mentoring 
and conflict resolution skills. 

Aimed at assisting youngsters 
aged 8 and older, the program 
is made up of three phases, 
explained Keith Lambert, 
P.E.A.C.E.KEEPERS 
coordinator. 

In the first is Conflict 
Resolution, a 12-week {rogram 
teaching non-violoit methods. 

The second phase is a year- 
long program made up ctf 



Fatherhood/Manhood for young 
males and Breaking the Chain 
for young females. Leadership 
Development and Club, the 
third phase, is a contiiming 
phase for young women and 
men together and will last as 
long as the young people 
continue to attend. 

"I believe we can make a 
difference,'!, |aid Lambert, who 
is pleased to offer the 
program's multi-faceted 
services. "Conflict resolution is 
just a small part of oar 
program." 

Lambert blames the loss of 
the sense of community in 
modem America for much of 
today's violence. 

"Conununity leaders, parents, 
neighbors should be helping our 
children, the child next door, 
the child across the street, our 
nieces and nephews, 
grandchildren, everybody," he 
said. "We should be helping 
everybody." 

When he was growing up in a 
tightly-knit community, 
everybody knew evnybody 
else and knew when the 
neighbors' children got into 
trouble. When Lambert did 
something wrong ai a 
youngster, he remembered 
being scolded by everybody in 
the neighborhood. 

"We don't have community 
any more," he said. "People 
knew who I was." 

With the disappearance of 
community has gone the 
reinforcement for positive 
behavior from the neighbors, 
and school safety has become 
an important issue for a large 
numb^ of children today. 

In fact, many students are 



afraid to go to the bathroom 
because of bullies, said Jim 
Belin, a corrections (teparmient 
employee who is in chaise of 
the Leadership Develqmirat 
portion of the 
P£A.C£.K£EPeRS program. 

He recmtly spoke to several 
youngsters at a Diver^ty 
Conference in a local middle 
school. 

"When you think things are 
going great, listen to middle 
acboolkidiin to 13," he said. 
"What they think are the top 
three diversity isaues — 
number one was violence." 

He was particularly saddened 
by the experiences of one little 
giri who had been beaten by 
bullies so frequently that she 
was becoming afiraid to come 
to school. "She needs help but 
so do the kids who are beating 
ho' up," he said. 

Belin assN-ted a. belief that 
youngsters are under some sort 
of attack and compared the 
work to a personal mission. 1 
am here and I am doing this 
program because it's lomedilng 
that I care about," said Uie 
retired army officer. He 
explained that he did not pny 
for safety half as much when 
he was in South East Asia 
during the Vietnam War as he 
does today. 



Conflict Resolution and 
Breaking the Chains meet on 
Thursdays from 7 to 9pjn. at the 
Mount Trashmore YMCA. 
Fatherhood/Manhood meets 
there on Tuesdays from 7 to 9 
p,m and on Saturday with a day 
of recreation. For more 
Information call thf Family 
Counseling Center, 498-1135. 



Operating budget passes $1 biilion 



Centlnuad From Pag* 1 

from $1,300 to $1,500. 

This compares with a $3,000 per 
capita debt limit in neighboring 
Chesapeake where the city manager 
has recommended deferring most 
capital projects at least for the 
1998-99 fiscal year. 

The resource plan, according to 
staff, is contingent on rising the 
debt limit po' capita. 

With the Lake Gaston i»oject 
finally exuicated from 12 years of 
litigation and the Navy's decision 
to bring more planes to Oceana, 
the city fMls freer about planning 
for the future. 

However, neither . the 
operating budget or the CIP 
contains funds to implement die 



MONKV lAIJvS 



Two public heariixis on the FY 
1998-99 oparating budget and 
capital Improvement program 
are scheduled: 

■ Thursday, April 18, 7 p.m., 
Larkspur Middle School. 

■ Tuesday, April 28, 2-4 p.m., 
City Hall conference room. 

Budget and CIP adoption are 
slated for Tuesday, May 1 2 at 2 
p.m. in Council Chambers. 



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public library improvements and 
expansion requested last year by 
the public library. 

The library had requested a 
November 1997 rtferendimito find 
new construction and rduA>Uitatk>n 
but no decisions were made. A 
number of options have beoi 
forwarded which council may 
consider at one of the budget 
workshops. 

Another policy decision facing 
council is the long-range planning 
for and financing of school 
instructional technology. 

Key provisions of the tolerating 
budget include: 

■ Funding full-year lease and 
operating costs for the new social 
services and building and idocated 
health dqiaitment; 

■ Cost increases in the Virginia 
Retirement System coverage for 
employees which imjmct twth the 
city and school (q}erati<Mis bud^ 
— the city contribution rate will 
increase from 11.91 to 13.59 
percent of salaries plus the 
stimulated costs of House Bill-36 
(Retirement Allowance F<»mula, 



macted by the legislature this yean 

■ The inclusion of 15 addUond 
police offices through the fisdeod 
CIPS grant prqpam bringing to 
103 the number of officers added 
for community policy through the 
inogram since fiscal year 1994-95; 

■ Over $1 million added to die 
social services budget in additional 
state and fedend revenue to rapport 
welfare reform; 166.92 net 
additional positions of whkh 
113.75 are funded through the 
school opiating Auk! and 53.17 by 
grants. 

The city budget increases the n^ 
full-time equivident positions by 
9.82. 

In both the operating and die 
capM budgets die schools take die 
biggest portion of the city's 
resources with a proposed opo^ing 
budget of $515,928,683, a 5.9- 
percent increase over the current 
year and school capital 
improvements coming u> 
$133,340,086, a $293.2 pereent 
increase over the current year's 
compared to city im{nx>vements, 
which make up $50,475,442 of die 
total program or a drop of 25.6 
percent over die current year. 

The executive summary of the 
resource plan notes that the city's 
current filial condition is excellent 
indicated by its strong fundbalaice 
75 to 100 percent of die subsequent 
year's general fund debt is 
maintained as an undesipaied 
general fund balance, an Aa2 bond 
rating (the highest in the regkin) 
and relatively low per capta 
spending. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



Many Annuity O^vners 

Lose Money, 

Do You? 



Many annuity owners lose over 50% of the value of their annuity when it 
pays off! 

It's true and we show you exactly how to avoid the loss in our booklet 
"Annuity Owner Mistakes." The booklet is free and shows how to get 
more benefits from your existing assets and preserve your annuity value. 

Call 800-843-3996 
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April Fool's Day: American-style 




Outki 
Left Field 

By Bob Ruegaegger, 
columni$t 



When Abraham Lincdn made the 
obswvation ihat "you can fool all the 
pwple some of the lime, and some of 
the people all the time, but you can- 
not fool ail 
the people 
all of the 
time," he 
indubitably 
intended 
his com- 
ment as an 
admonition 
to politi- 
cians and a 
compli- 
mentary 
(by refer- 
ence) to the 
voting pub- 
lic. 

— _ R e - 

""""'"'"""""^ cently.I've 
been hav- 
ing some very serious doubts about 
whether the American public is at ail 
deserving of the credit ol' Honest 
Abe conferred upon us during his 
spcwh on SepL 8. 1858 in Clinton, 
Illinois. 

Sometimes it appears that most of 
the public is fooled most of the lime 
by the politicians, the promoters and 
ihepaiwrazzi. 

Although April Fools' Day is also 
observed in Australia, Great Britain, 
Canada and France, Americans in 
particular appear to actually "cel- 
ebrate" it throughout the entire year. 
Americans seem to be "lalcen in" 
continuously by every political scam 
and fraudulent claim known to man, 
Our culture simply reveals in social 
tomfoolery. 

Politicians, fwexample, still might 



not be able to fool all of the people all 
of the time, but they certainly appear 
to be making "progress" in that direc- 
tion. At ihc very least, enough of 
them fool enough of the people 
enough of the time in order to Mcure 
sufficient votes for re-election. 

One of the problems with "repre- 
sentative" government is that our rep- 
resentatives represent the people, 
special interest groups and them- 
selves. Thai's where ihe difficulty 
exists. 

No matter how earnest a politician 
might be, he (or she) also must con- 
sider his own interests, and it is likely 
that his personal interesu will take 
precedence over the interests of his 
constituents when a disparity devel- 
ops between the two. Only a fool, a 
person who has no clue about normal 
human behavior, could think other- 
wise. And if personal interest isn't 
enough, throw campaign contribu- 
tions into that equation. 

Essentially, a campaign conuibu- 
tion isalegal bribe. What knucklehead 
could honestly believe that a substan- 
lial contribution to an elected 
official'scampaign coffers would not 
eventually produce some kind of ad- 
vantage for the patron? 

Yet the priu:tice continues because 
the law permits it Who makes the 
rules? Hmmm. 

Much to their "credit," politicians 
have aLso convinced us that we can 
have more government services and 
pay less in taxes — an impossibility, 
We simply cann« receive more and 
Cfflitribuie less. 

It doesn't lake a rocket scientist to 
see the absurdity of that formula, yet 
many Americans can't seem to grasp 
that elementary concept.' 



Beach's Van Cleave In 
New York production 



Chris Van Cleave of Virginia 
Beach will play Jesus in "Slabat 
Mater: Donna De Paradiso," a folk 
opera to be performed April 7-8 in 
the Cathedral of St. John the 
Divine in New York City. The 
cathedral is the largest Gothic 
cathedral in the world. 
Perfonnances will begin at 7:30 
p.m. Tickets are S15 ($10 for 
students and seniors). Call (212) 
665-4516 for information. 

Nowrangcr to the role of Jesus, 
'^f^Gietmam^mtwo mmtmal 
tours of "Jesus Christ Sufwrsiar" in 
the United States and Canada and 
also played Jesus in a British tour. 
He wrote the musical score and 
played Joe Davidson (a modem day 
Jesus) in "The Davidson Affair" r. 
the Wells Theater, Norfolk, in the 
early 1980s. In recent years, he 
played Jesus in two Easter 
productions of "Let All Heaven 
Rejoice" at the Pavilion and 
"Godspeir'at the ARE Conference 
Center. Van Cleave will soon be 
seen as Don Quixote in "Man of 
La Mancha" for a 12-pcrfomiance 
run at the ARE beginning May 29. 
Unlike previous performances of 




Chris Van Cleave 

Jesus, Van Cleave will sing this 
one in Italian and Latin with 
highly-stylized actions based on 
Medieval perfomiance patterns. TTje 
opera is based on a poem by 
Medieval monk Jacopone da Todi, 
who was excommunicated and 
imprisoned for his poems against 
the power and corruption of the 
Pope and the Catholic church. 



Health department open 
house, ribbon cutting set 



The Virginia Beach Dq)jtflment 
of Public Health will host an open 
house on Friday (today) from 3 to 
6 p.m. at its newly-relocated office 
at Pembroke Corporate Center III, 
4452 Corporation Lane in Virginia 
Beach. 

Visit the new office space, meet 
the staff and celebrate Public 
Health Week. Health director Dr. 
Venita Newby-Owens and Maycw 
Meyera Obemdorf will conduct a 
short program and ribbon-cutting 
ceremony at 3:30 p.m. 

The Virginia Beach Dqiartment 
of Public Health has lecendy 
relocated and consolidated three 
office sites into one location at 
Pembroke Corporate Center III. 
The department occupies 32,635 
square f^t of sp^e on tfie first two 
floors of the three-story building. 

Services offered at the new 
k)catkmaiea: 

■ Communicable disease 
servk»s. 

■ Dental clinic services fo- 
dukken 

■ WIC program (Wcrnicp. 
in&tts and chil^oi). 

■ Family health services 
including free routine chUdKiod 
immunizations. 

■ Home visiting and c^e 
ma^ement to high-risk {x^nant 
wonen smd children. 

■ Healthy Start prt^ram. 

■ EnvircNimental health s^vices 
including food protection services, 
sewer and water services and 
gmenl envinwunwital ^rv^s. 

■ Community services health 
pwncKiai {vc^nffls. 



■ Vital Statistics Office. 

The site is in a central location 
in Virginia Beach and is on major 
bus routes. The WtC Program still 
maintains three additional offices in 
Virginia Beach. 

Consolidation of 113 staff to this 
one location has resulted in 
reduction of network costs, pooling 
of vehicles, A/V equipment and 
cellular phones, reduction of travel 
between sites, a better design for 
clinic facilities and shared staff. 

For more information call 518- 
2677. 



'A Chorus Line' to 
open at Pavilion 

Virginia Musical Theatre opens 
"A Chorus Line" on Friday, April 
17 at the Virginia Beach Pavilion 
TTicatre. 

"A Chorus Line" runs Friday, 
April 17 and 24 at 8 p.m., 
Saturday, April 18 and 25 at 2 
p.m. and 8 p.m. aid Sunday Apil 
19 and M at 2 p.m, at tlK Vii^inia 
B^ch Pavilion Theatre, Tickets arc 
$15 to $30. children $7.50. Group 
ad miliiay dis^unts are 
available. 

Tickets may be purchased tt 
TicketMasier outlets, the Pavilion 
Theatre Box Office, Iwanches (rf 
nia Bank or by callktg 
iiiL V II giiiia Musical Theatre Box 
Offtte, 340-5446. 



Another just cause for jubilation 
on April Fools' Day is the unbeliev- 
able penchant of the American public 
to embr^e nearly every fad, fashion 
and promotion invented by mankind. 

When Riineas T. Bamum noted 
that there was a "sucker bom every 
minute," he might have been entirely 
justified adding "in America" for 
special emi^asis. From athletic shoes 
to automobiles and from toilet paper 
to lax shelters, everyone aj^jears to 
be promoting something "extraordi- 
nary." 

And again the promoter— as is the 
politician — is able to fool enough of 
the people ernugh of the time to 
make an almost obscene ptofii 

Do advertisers and promoters view 
Americans as duped dolts doling out 
dollars? It's difficult to decide. 

Famous ptaplc, tasteless jingles, 
pseudo scienceand perfunctory prom- 
ises appear to account fa* greater 
sales and produci popularity than the 
quality of the [mxlucts themselvte. 
Only in America! 

Final ly , the paparazzi, the journal- 
ists and photographers, pummel the 
public with what they regard as im- 
portant and newsworthy. Sometimes 
we're even told what to think. 

Unfortunately, the American pub* 
lie generally accepts their offerings 
of propaganda and images with little 
critical evaluation; like buffoons, we 
foolishly believe to a large degree 
exactly what we are told. 

While we're being distracted by 
the flash and form of the rich and 
famous, items of true consequences 
go almost unnoticed. CelebritiM, ath- 
letes and criminals seem to make the 
headlines and the real hooes and 
heroines are seldom even acknowl- 
edged. That's the real tragedy. 

As Americans, we truly have much 
to "celebrate" on April Fools' Day; 
perhaps we ought to observe April 
Fools' Month. 

We can begin to come to grips with 
our national imprudence simply by 
being aware of our foolishness. 
Chuang-Tzu, a Chinese Taoist phi- 
losopher (c . 300 8C), had some words 
of encouragement: "TTiose who real- 
ize their folly are not true fools." 

Perhaps our national situation is 
not without hope. 



Legal 
Notices 



Public Notlct 



Virginia: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINL\ 
BEACH 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
Plaintiff v. 

51,593.00 U.S. Currency 
(Hobbs),CL95-2609 
-i615.00 U.S. Currency 
(C(»prew).CL97-10 

$1,006.00 U.S. Currency 
(Anderson), CL97-507 

Sl,750.00 U.S. Currency 
(Godwin). CL95-686 

$850.00 U.S. Currency (Koch), 
CL97-2283 

$337.00 U.S. Currency (Kn^jp), 
CL97-2284 

CL97-3530 $25,900.00 USC 
(Brown/Jennings), Defendants 
Order of Publication And Affidavit 
THIS DAY CAME the Attorney 
for the Commonwealth and moved 
this Honorable Court to forfeft to 
the Commonwealth of Virg;inia the 
above referenced items that were 
seized between August 9, 1995, 
and December 3, 1997. 

AN information was made, 
signed and filed with the Circuit 
Court Clerk's Office on each of the 
above matters. Said information 
stated the owner(s) of the property 
and the last known address(es)of 
the owner(s) at the time the 
Information was filed. 

It ai^jearing that the wherrabouts 
of the owners is cunrcnily 
unknown, and that a registned 
letter has been mailed to their last 
known addresses, it is hereby 
ORDERED, that all j^rlies appear 
on or before May 20, 1998, and do 
whatever is necessary to prMect 
their interest in said property. 

It is further ORDERED that 
pureuant to Section 19.2-386.3(8) 
of the Code of Virginia (1950), as 
amended, this Od^of Publicaiion 
be published once a week for foiff 
successive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newsjaper of goj^al 
circulation in the City of Virginia 
Beach. 

ENTER THIS 24th day rf 
March. 1998, 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk of the 
Circuit Court 

By Barbara Mundin. Eiquty 
Cleit 
1 ask far this: 
Robert J. Humpineys 
Commonwealth's Attcvmy 
By fitoy Y, ftsssler 
Assistant Commonwealth's 
Amtmy 

OffiM of the C^mmonwoM's 
ABMwy 



2305 Judicial BmkvtaA, 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456- 
9050 

I, Mary Y. Geisler, Assistant 
Commonwealth's Attorney, aAer 
having first duly sworn, depose and 
state as follows: 

That pursuant to Section 8.01- 
316 of the Code of Virginia 
(1950), as amended, that diligetKe 
has been used without effect to 
ascertain the location of the above 
listed parties. 

Mary Gessler, Affiant 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH, 
to-wit: 

I, Jaye Lee A. Cullen, a Notary 
Public in and for the City and State 
aforesaid, do hereby certify that the 
foregoing Affidavit of Mary Y. 
Gessler, Assistant 
Commonwealth's Attorney, vm 
sworn to and subscribed to before 
me this 20th day of March, 1998 

Jaye Lee A. CuUen, Notary 
Public 

My Commission Expires: 
6/30/000 

14-2 
414-24 



Public Nollet 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

LEASE OF CITY PROPERTY 

The Virginia Beach City Council 
will hold a PUBUC HEARING on 
Tuesday. April 14, 1998, at 2:00 
p.m. in the City Council Chamber 
regarding the renewal of lease 
apeementsofCity owned property 
located at the Virginia Beach 
Farmers Market, as ^fined betow: 
Space #1 Jacqueline 
Shelldb{^& Produce; and 

• Space #2 (Farmers Market 
Restaurant) to Virginia Food 
Services, Incoporated; and 

The purpose of this public 
hearing will be to obuin public 
comment on the renewal of these 
leases of City property. >^y 
questions concerning these mattm 
should be directed to Ms. Tacsy 
Friedsam, Farmers Market 
Manager, by calling (757) 427- 
4395. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC/AAE 

City Clerk 

If you are physically disabled or 
visually impaired and need 
assistance at this meeting, please 
call the CITY CLERK'S OFFICE 
at 427-4303; Hearing impaired, call 
TDD only 427-4305 (TDD ■ 
Telephonic Device for the DeaO> 

144 
1(4-3 



Public Nolle* 



VIRGINIA: IN THE JUVENILE 
AND DOMESTIC RELATIONS 
DISTRICT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 
IN RE: 

KATHERINE ELIZABETH 
POORE, a Minor 

IN THE MATTER OF THE 
ADOPTION OF THE CHILD 
KNOWN AS KATHERINE 
ELIZABETH POORE 

BIRTH CERTIFICATE 
REGISTRATION 

NO. 145-94-073788, 
REGISTERED IN THE 
COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
notify Steven Wayne Matthews, 
the putative father of the minor 
child, that a Petition to adopt the 
minor child by Leigh Poore Harris, 
the natural mother of the minor 
child, and Jeffrey L. Harris, the 
spouse of the natural mother, has 
been filed. 

And affidavit having been made 
and filed that the last known post 
office address of Steven Wayne 
Matthews was 824 Rivanna River 
Reach, Chesapeake, Virginia, 
23320, that mail has been returned 
and that the current whereabouts of 
Steven Wayne Matthews ae 
unknown. 

It is ORDERED that the said 
Steven Wayne Matthews, upon 
whom diligence has been used 
without effect to ascertain his 
location, appear at the above named 
Court on or before May 14, 1998 
at 11:00 A.M. and do what is 
necessary to proia;t his interests. 

It is further ordered that the 
foregoing portion of this order be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper publish«l 
in the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

FREDERICK C. JENKS. fll, 
CLERK 

KELLAM. PICKRELL. COX & 
TAYU>E 
A ftofessional Corpcxatiai 
JANICE PICKRELL 
ANDERSON 

300 Bank of the Commonwealth 
Buiklii^ 
403Boush$ve^ 
NorWk.VA23510 
TetejAone: (757) 627-8365 

14-1 
4t4-J4 



Serial: 1G2NE69U5GC606696 
Auctk>n Date: 4/10/98 
Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Nfotor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy Norfolk. Va 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company 
resales the right to bid. 

14-3 
114-3 



Public Notica 



Virginia: 

The regulff meeting of the City 
Council of the City of Virginia 
Beach will be held in the Council 
Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Municii»l Center, 
Princess Anne Sution, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on Tuesday, AprU 
14, 1998 at 2:00 p.m., at «4iich 
time the following q^lkatiims 
will be heard: 

CONDmONAL USE PERMIT: 

VIROINIA BEACH BOROUGH 

1. An Ordintttce upon 
Ai^licatku) of the City of Vir^ia 
Beach for a Conditional Use Pnmit 
for a commercial [^rtcing lot at Ihe 
ncH'theast intersection of Atlantic 
Avenite and 30th Street Said parcel 
is located at 3003 Atlantic Avenue 
and contains 1.03 acres. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 

2. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Mills Lawn A. 
Garden/James H. Mills for a 
Conditional Use Permit for small 
engine repair on the east side of 
Commonwealth Place on Lot 0-2, 
Level Green. Said parcel is kxated 
at 928 Commonwealth Place arxl 
contains 1.54 acres. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

STREET aOSURE: 

VIROINIA BEACH BOROUGH 

3; Application of School Boanl 
of Virginia Beach for the 
discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of a portion of 15th 
Street beginning at the easton 
boundary of Mediterranean Avojue 
and running in an easterly direction 
a distance of 325 feet. Said peicel 
is SO feet in width and contains 
16.250 square feet. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH 

AMENDMENT: 

4. An Ordinance to mend 
Section 203 of the City Zoning 
Ordinance pertaining to on-site 
parking requirements for 
restaurants. 

5. An Ordinance to amend 
Section 203 of the City Zoning 
Ordinance pertaining to peridng 
requiremenu for extremely large 
shopping centers. 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

6. Ai^lication of James Patrick 
Kuehn for an enlargement of a 
nonconforming use on Lot 121, 
Section 4, Cape Story By The Sea. 
Said parcel is located at 2214 
Baybeny Street and contains 6900 
square feet. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in 
the Planning Department. 
LYNNHAVEN BCHIOUGH. 

All interested parties are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith. CMC/AAE 

City CleA 

If you are physically disabled or 
visually impaired and need 
assistance at this meeting, please 
call the CITY CLERK'S OFFICE 
at 427-4303; Hearing impaired, call 
TDD only 427-4305 (TDD - 
Telq)honic Device for the DeaO. 

13-4 
2t4-3 



Vkgiali Beech Sm, FMdiy. AprU 3, 1998 5 

tite mnounconent of sale. 
This is a c(xnmunication from a 

debtcoHectw. 
Glas^ and GUsser, P.L.C.. 
Std»titute Trustee 
DtHninion Tower, Suite 600 
999 Watereide Drive 
Ncfffolk.VA 23510 
Tel: (757) 625-6787 Ext. 200 
Between 10:00 a.m. &. 12:00 

mm only. 

13-2 
2i4-3 



Public Nolle* 



Public Nolle* 



PuMe Nolle* 



Aociion: 1986 
Am, 4A^, Grey 



Pontiac Gund 



Trustee's Sale 

2220 Wind Branch Circle. 

Virginia Beach, VA 

DEFAULT having been made in 

the terms of a certain Eteedof Trust 

dated November 22, 1995, and 

n«orded in the Qok's Office of the 

Circuit Court of the City of 

Virginia Beach, V A, in Deed Bode 

3562. at page 1199. and the 

undersigned, having been <My 

appointed as Substitute Truaees 

and having b^»i requested so to do 

by the holder of the note sectned, 

will proceed to sell at public 

auction for cash on Ajwil 14, 1998, 

at 9:00 a.m., at the front enhance 

of the Virginia Beach Circuit 

Courthouse, facing Coivthouse 

Boulevard (Building 10), Virginia 

Beach Judicial Center, 2305 

Judicial BcNilevard. Virginia Beach. 

VA. the iMt^jerty designatedas Lot 

57, Section 1 Subdivision of Pine 

Ridge. Swtion 1 ami S(xtion 3- A. 

plat recorded in the aforesakl 

Clerk's Office in Map Book 136. 

«|M^5. 

The pn^ity will be sold subject 
to all prior liens. ras«JKnts, 
restrictions, covenants, and 
conditi(ms, if any. of recwd, or 
other matters which would be 
disck^ed by an accurate survey or 
iaqKctitMi of the pemises. 

A deposit (in certified funds) <rf 
10% will be required of die 
succ^^il iHdck^ at tinw (rf sate and 
settkment to be ma<k within 10 
days. TERMS: CASH. Tte 
wcixsfullscktewill be required to 
execute a Memorandum rf 
Trash's Sale outlining acUkkxuri 
mtm of sale «id tralement, w^ich 
^U be availMe fo rev^w prnrio 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

ON THE 17TH DAY OF 
MARCH. 1998 

IN RE: Applicttion to EstabliA 
the n«sumptive Death of Qiartene 
Pmicm ViUinger 

CH98-864 
ORDER OF PUBUCATION 

TO WHOM IT MAY 
CONCERN: 

This is a proceeding by which 
the Applicttit seeks to establish the 
presumptive death of Ouakne 
Penton Villinger, pursuant to the 
provisions of Title 64.1, Output 
5, of the Code of Virginia, 1950, 
as amended, Charlene Penton 
ViUingn^ having not been seen or 
head from since approximately 
September 4, 1989, and your 
I4)plicant, Donald K«n, Jr. seeking 
to have the fact of her death 
e«id>Uahed. 

A hearing has been set in 
ViiVinia Beach Circuit Court m 
May 21. 1998 at 11:00 a.m., to 
hetr evidence concerning the 
allied tbaence of Charlene Penton 
VilUn^r and the circumsumces aid 
duntkMi ^lereof and for entry of an 
order pursuant to Section 64.1-109 
oftheCodeofVii^inia. 

It is hereby ORD^ED that any 
person or interested party tppeu 
and take whatever steps neconry 
to protect their interests. 

It is further ORDERED that this 
Ofder be published once a week for 
four successive weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun, a new^Mper 
of general circulation in Virginia 
Besch, Virginia. 

Certified to be a TRUE COPY of 
record in my custody 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 

Circuit Court. Virginia Beach 

By: Phyllis N. Stenas. Depu^ 
Clerk 

Enter this 17th day of Maidi, 
1998. 

Edward W. Hansen, Circuit 
Court Judge 

I ask for this: 

Rkiard W. Whitiemore. Ootmsd 
for A{^licant 

Rkhard W. Whitt«nore, Esq. 

Richard W. WhittemOTc. P.C. 

3104 Arctk: Ave.. P.O. Box 981 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23451 

(757)425-5900 

13-1 
414-17 



Public Nolle* 



Three's Sale 
1244 Skylark Drive. 
Viqinia Beach, VA 
DEFAULT having been made in 
die terms of a certain Deedof Trtist 
dated Afml 30, 1996, andieconkd 
in the Cleric's OffK^of the Circuit 
Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, VA. in DeedBook 3612. at 
page 726. and the mdersigned, 
having been duly appointed as 
Substitute Trustees and having 
been requested so to do by the 
holder of the note secured, will 
proceed to sell at public auction for 
cash on Apil 14. 1998. at 10:00 
a.m., at the fnmt of the building 
twusing Uw Viiginia Beach Circuit 
Court. 2305 Judicial Boulevard, 
Virginia Beach. VA 23456. the 
prx^rty designated as Lot One (1). 
in Block I (eye), as shown on the 
plat of Resubdi vision of S«:tion 2. 
Cardinal Esutes, which plat is 
recorded in Ok Oak's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City <rf 
Vi^nia Beach, VA. in Map Book 
64. at page 49. 

TTic property will be sold subjea 
to all prior liens, ea^ments. 
restrictions, covenants, and 
conditions, if any, of record, or 
other matters which would be 
disclo»d by an ace urate survey or 
inq)a;ti<» of the premises. 

A deposit (in certified funds) of 
10% will be required of die 
successful bidder at time of s^e and 
settlement to be matfc within 10 
days. TERMS: CASH. The 
a«%«ssful iMdderwHI be required to 
execute a Memorandum oi 
Trustee's Sale outlining additionai 
terms of sale and ^ttlcment, whkA 
will be avaihd)te for review prior to 
the Hinounconent of ^le. 

This is a conmunication from a 
debt colkctor. 
GlassCT and Glassjr, P.L.C.. 
Sitetibiie Trusee 
DoiniBim Tow», Suite 600 
999 Wwaside Drive 
Norfolk. VA 23510 
Td: (757) 625-6787 Ext MO 
Between 10:00 a.m. & 12KX) 
nocn (Nily. 
Fite m. 414W 

12-4 
10 



1 <i ^^.wv L J LmLmmmmmmmmmimmmmfmmmmmmmfmmm^^KW^F 



'VPP 



^^^^mmmmmmtimmmmmmmmmmmm 



6 Virginia Beach Sun, Friday. April 3, 1998 



Classifieds 



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All Classified Ads run in three news|Mipers (The Virginia Beach Sun, The Chesap- 
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Please print clearly using only one word per box. 


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FOR HELP with your Classified Ad, please call 547-4571 . 

COMBINATION RATE: Run tMi una partonal ad In any «lhar Bywiy PuUeaUons nMwpiiw tor an 
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DImirUdI* an) Palaribufg. CM 547-4571 lor Mali. 



ADOPTIONS 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



ADOPTION: A beautiful choice 
made out of love and concern for 
your baby's future. Let us help. De- 
voted, childless couple longing to 
share our love with a newborn. Will 
pay medical/legal costs. Judy & 
Steve 1-800-504-3292. 

4/17 

ADOPTION Loving, childless couple 
wishing to adopt an infant. Willing to 
pay legal and medical expenses. Call 
Nancys Sheldon. 1-800-892-5164. 
Arlington, VA. 

4/3 

A LOVING COUPLE seeks new- 
born to complete our family, and to 
share its love, laughter and warmth. 
Stay at home Mom. Expenses paid. 
Susanne/Paul 1-800-975-5495. 

4/24 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Retired Navy Master Chief John O. 
Parmele, Jr., asks for your vote. May 
5, 1998, Virginia Beach Council. 

LEARN HYPNOSIS 

Certification Weekend 
'April 17-19 
Virginia Beach 
featuring 
Vicki McOonaM, ACH 
DavkJ A Willis. ACH 
Call Toll Free 
1-888-868-8377 
for a free brochure! 

4/10 

Interested in barbering, cosmetol- 
ogy or nail technotogy? HAMPT^ 
ROADS SCHOOL OF HAIR TECH- 
NOLOGY call 622-9400. Financial 
Aid available if qualified. 

4/3 

VISA - MASTERCARD No credit 
needed! New Method! Guaranteed! 
For details send SASE - $2.00 S& H/ 
to: 1 920 - 1 25 Centerville Tpke. #1 46, 
Va Beach, VA 23464-6859. 



AUCTION - CHOWAN GALLERY 

Next aurtton 3/28 - 6:13 pm (919- 
398-8020) B Hill, NC 
#1490,VA#2323. 

4/17 



HERBAUFE Independent distribu- 
tors. For product call 456-1698. For 
opportunity call 456-1 671 . 

4/10 

I LOST 35 POINDS in 7 weeks and 

kept K off I All natural. For results call 
Austa, 428-7084. 4/10 

FREE CASH GRANTS! College. 
Scholarships. Business. Medical bills 
Never Repay. Toll Free 1-800-218- 
9000 Ext. G-15385. 

4/10 

Losers to Win! Fat toThIn! 

Doctor recommended. 100% guar- 
anteed. Call 1 •800-563-0398. 

4/3 

LOSE 7 T0 10 LBS IN ONE WEEK 

All natural. Medk:ally endorsed diet. 
No starvatton. No drugs. Superior 
results. SASE plus $2.00 S&H to: 
1920-125 Centerville Tpke. #146, 
Va Beach. VA 23464-6859. 

4/3 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



BEANIE BABIES Cun^ent, some 
retired. Erin and hard to find. Call 
853-5472 before 9 p.m. 
4G 

FORMAL EVENING GOWN Navy 
blue, sequined, sleeveless, size 12, 
worn once. Great buy at $150. 587- 
2839. 4/3 



PIAI«K} WeiMr Digital Baby Grand w/ 
stool. Whits, 3 yrs. okj, limited use. 
ShoMnoom condition. $3,000. Call 
499-0080. 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



1989 GMC Jimmy 4x4. Runs good. 
4.3 Voitex. $5995. negotiable. Call 
562-3021. 4/10 

SEIZEDCARSfrom$175. Porches, 
Cadillacs, Chevy's, BMW's Cor- 
vettes. /Mso Jeeps, 4WD's. Your area. 
Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 Ext. A- 
1 5385 for current listings. 

4/10 



BEAUTY SUPPLIES 



A BEAUTIFUL BODY could be 
yours I Your own! If I said you coukf 
have a beautiful body in 90 days, 
would you just call? 473-0473. 

4^ 

DRY, SORE, CRACKED HANDS? I 

have found a remedy for mine. It may 
help you ,too ! Call me .•631-0716. 

4/24 

LOOK GOOD! FEEL GOOD! Call 
forproductandopportunity. Herbalife 
Distributor. Free sample-Free infor- 
matbn booklet. Call 363-7080. 

4/24 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 



COKE/PEPSI 

Best Program in U.S.A. 
Excellent locatk>ns 
$1,200 -t- weekly potential 
100% financing available 
1 -800-61 7-6430 ext# 1106. 



4/3 



EARN THOUSANDS Stuffing enve- 
k)pes. Send self -addressed, stamped 
envelope:J&Dlnc.,POBox24496, 
Rtehmond.Va 23224. 

4/24 



WORK FROM HOME Earn from 
$500 to $8000 per month PT/FT 
Complete training provided. For In- 
formation call (757) 548-2656. 



EARN THOUSANDS stuHing enve- 
lopes. Send self -addressed, stamped 
envelope: J& D Inc. PO Box 24426, 
Rtehmond, VA 24426. 



EARN THOUSANDS stuffing enve- 
lopes. Send self addressed stamped 
envebpe to J&D Inc. suite 128, 
2143-B Colliseum Dr. Hampton, 
VA 23666-5902. 
4/3 

COKE/PEPSI VENDING ROUTE 

Many high traff k: sites. $2500 a week 
potential. Call 800-342-6653. 

5/1 



EXCHANGE STUDENTS 



LOOKING FOR A CHANGE OF 
PACE? Host an exchange student 
from Germany, or one from any other 
Scandinavian, European, South 
Amercan or Asian county. They like 
music, skiing, skating, sports, his- 
tory, and languages. Arrive in Au- 
gust and have own spending money 
and insurance. Call today 1 -800-SIB- 
LING or visit the web at 
www.sibling.org. American 
IntercuKural Student Exchangee non 
profit tax exempt educattonal pro- 
gram. 

4/3 



FARM EQUIP /VEHICLES 



HAGIE 280 Hi-boy diesel 800 gal. 
capacity hydrostatic 4wd. 12.4 - 28" 
tires 72 ft/60ft. boom variable row 
width wheel base. Call 757-654- 
9468. 4/10 



Service Directory 



CHILD CARE 



CHILD CARE 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 



NORFOLK TLC in my home. ABC & 
1 23's. Bfele stories & preschool ac- 
tivWes. CPR 587-8280. 

4/3 

CMLDCARE - ALL AOES Lovir^ 
tKMTie. 2 (^wninga available. WeM- 
•m Brai%h Apm. Cal Samfra at 
48t-1K)2. m? 



SIESTA GARD0I AREA - Flexbl* 
hours. Mifltwy fainly. Any a;}*. Rea- 
sonaUe mm , Cm 086-2782. 

4/3 

DEEP OtESC CMLO CMm Iten- 
Fri 7 a.m. ta 6pM. USDA mw^wl, 
Mf IcMMd. 2yMn ami Mp. 4K- 

4a». 4^ 



Will care for CMLO OR SENIOR in 

my Poplar Halls home. Mon-Fri. 
Snxk^ irK^uded. 466-0071. 

4/3 



COMPUTER SERVICE 



Computer trouirieshooting upgrades 
m¥i new systwns. Comprtitive rates. 
CM 489-0688 or 419-8543 digital 
p^er 24 twurs a day. 

4^ 

«NaC QUAUTY IMMWrOR RE- 
PAIR Flat rates* marth warranty. 
MM ra^rs 2 days or lass. RMon- 
MieMdmNM»storsris. llS8Fv« 
(^I^MRMd. m. 3, Vbpnia Beac^ 
Va 4^-5207. 



RUTLEDQE ELECTRIC - 20 YRS. 

Experience. Free estimates. Li- 
censed, Insured. Call 986-2050 or 
578-5388 (d^tal pager). 

ADVANCED ROORMS All typesi 
Replacement windows, vinyl sWrng. 
Unbelievab^ tow prices! Ltoensed & 
insured. 4^)- 1022 

4/10 




FINANCIAL 



AVOID BANKRUPTCY Free debt 
consolid^on w/ applk:ation service. 
Cut payment to 65%. 24 hr. approval 
regardlessof credit. 1 -800-873-8207. 

4/1 3R 

A WAY TO STOP BANKRUPTCY 

Free debt consolidatbn application 
with services. Stop collection calls. 
Fast Help. WE CARE! Call 1-800- 
517-3406. 



FLEA MARKETS / BAZAARS 



RIVERSIDE MALL & FLEA MAR- 
KET 350 Campostella Road, Nor- 
folk. Now open Sundays from 10-4 
Call 545-2407 for table resen/ations 

and additional info. 

4/24 



Pembroke Manor United 

Church of Christ. 

600 Independence Blvd. 

3rd Saturday of each month 8 - 3 

SHOP OR SELL 

For reservatton/informatton 

Call 456-9106 

4/17 



FURNITURE 



HOTEL FURNITURE from Pavillton 
Towers selling one piece or tots. 
Dressers, beds, desks.chairs, lamps, 
mirrors, carpets, pictures etc. Call 
622-8300. See at 2401 Monticelto 
Ave. 

4^ 

FURNITURE COLLECTIONS OF 
CAROLINA SAVE! 

Buy direct from Hickory. NC. Major 
manufacturers brochures available. 
Phone 1-800-968-9079. 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



FRESH FISH 

SNOW CRAB 

CLUSTERS 

$2.99 LB. 

Bay scallops $2.99 lb 
Louisiana Oysters 
$4.99 Pint $25. Bushel 
D & M Seafood- Open Sundays 
1649 Independence Blvd. 464-3771 
Shipps Comer 468-1757 
We Accept Food Stamps 



MILTON'S MART/DELI Homemade 
hot & miki sausage. All types of 
smoked pork items - hams, baoin, 
Dan Doodles. Whole pigs. Suffolk. 
VA Call (757) 986-2721. 

4/17 



HELP WANTED 



MAINTENANCE LIGHTING 
HELPER/TRAINEE 

Needed by nattonal company to as- 
sist technbian in the maintenance of 
tocal retail lightiing syatems. Me- 
chanical/electrical aptitude preferred, 
but will train to leam the trade. Ca- 
reer advancement, medical, dental. 
401 K and vacatton pay offered. Drug 
test and acceptable driving record 
required. Call David Stenn at 
lllumElex Corp. at 1-800-964-1205 
votoemail «51 39 and leave maasagt, 
to aaolv. EOF 

4/3 

HELP WANTED for general yard 
work. Trimming, edging In 
Churchland area. /^prox. 4 hours/ 
wk. Nfce for retired person. Call 397- 
3296 M-F, 8-5 PM. 

4/3 



(AU NETWORK J 
■ CLASSIFIEDS ^ 

BUNKET ALL VIRGINIA 

Ad Network Classifieds are 

published In 78 state newspapers. 

4 million plus readers. 

25 WORDS $225. 

(For more than 25 words there is an additional 
charge of $8.00 per word.) 

call 547-4571 



for Classified Representative 



WOLFF TANNING BEOS TAN AT will p«y lor Ihem We bill MEDICARE FORD TRACTOR MODEL 641 ' 
HOME. Buy DIRECT and SAVEI (or you and ship direcllylo your door WELDER HOBAHT,TD4-292"'8IQ 
Commarcial/Home unils from MED-A-SAVE. 1-800-638-9849 JOE'FORKLIFT'VORNEIRTRAN- 
1199,00 Low Monthly Payment* SITS, IOC ' THEODOLITE, LIETZ 

FREE Color Catalog CALL TO- COASTALNCWATERFRONTIISIIZ/ T600 ■ BICYCLES • COMPUTERS 
DAY 1-800-842-1310. Month. Gorgeous Uacrebuildingsila ' PRINTERS ' FILE CABINETS ■ 

nestled amid pines t hardwoods w/ COPIERS ' LAPTOP ' FILE CABI- 
CREDIT CARD PROBLEMS? Debt pristine WF E«cellenl llshing & boat- NETS' MUCH MORE • ITEMS SUB- 
Consolidallon. Avoid Bankruptcy, ing Power, phone, more Unheal- JECTTOCHANGEI "FORACOM- 
Stop Creditor Calls Cut Interest, able deal! Call TLC 919-355-9288, PLETE LISTING CONTACT STATE 
No Credit Check. One Low Pay- ent. 7087 Pnce:$14,900,20%down, SURPLUS (804)238-3666 OR 
ment. National Consolidators, Inc bal fin 15 yrs at 7.58 tixed, OAC. WWW DGS.STATE.VA.US/OPS. 
(800) 270-9894. 

EXCITING NEW COOKWAREI! New 300 OualHy Qreded Cows sell April 
DRIVERS... Swift Trantponallon molecular impact Induction bonding 4th. 1998 at 12.00 noon, at the 
ExpariencadftlnexperttiwedDriv- creates the heaviest and most ad- Cu^)eperAgEnlerpnse,lnCulpeper, 
ers Wanledl Low Cost CDL Train- vanced cookware on the market, SO VA. Mostly spnngcahrerswUhcaives 
ing Available! Great Pay & Ben- year old International company now by side, some lall calvers all Uqm 
efils, Job Stability, Home Often, accepting applications lor dislribu- some ol Virginia's top herds. Best 
Consistent Miles 1-800-347-4698 torshrps in this area Successlul ex- set ol cows to sell In this sale to 



(eoe.ni/1) 

•CASH- IMMEDIATE $$ (or struc- 
tured settlemenls and deterred in- 
surance claims J.G. Wentworth 1- 
888-231-5375. 



perience in cookware, party-plan or dale. For more inlonnallon con 
in-home sales only! Call in strictest lad. Jim Johnson at ttie Virginia 
confidence. TownacraH t-88S-655- Cattlemen's Associallon, 540-992- 
5622. 1009. 



LOCAL CANDY ROUTE. 30 Vend- 
ing Machines Earn apx $800/day 
All (or $9,995 Call 1-800-998- 
VEND 



ing and computer work. Great pay. 
Call 1-800-632-8007 



TAN AT HOME. DONT MAKE A AUCTION Amherst County. MOW 
HUGE mistake. Compare the - acres, new eunrey, 1/2 mile road 
SunMasler bed to everything else. IronI, bold ilrum, wooded, sells In 
You'll be glad you did Free color 2tracte. Zoned A- 1, April 4lh, 1:05 
catalog Financing 1-800-533-7282 p.m. Wingfleld Auctioneers 804- 

929-1623. 
CASH NOWtl WE purchase mott- 
StAVONSS Potential $200-$2000 gages,annultles.andbusinessnotes. NEED A LOAN? We cen helpl 
per month Sell where & when you Since 1984 highest prices paid. Free Consolldale Credit Cards. Fast 
like, its not just door to door any- estimates, prompt professional ser- Resultslll Good or Bad Credit. 
more.Medical/olherlnsuranceBvill- vice. Colonial Financial. 1-800-969- (688)667-8893. UbcKyAssodalas, 
able. 1-800-288-631 1 . Ind. Rep. 1200 ext. 52. 

Financial Problems for all Purposes 
Assemble Arts, Gratis and toys in Respiratory problems? Paying for Consolidate Mortgages. Busi- 
your spare time. Also serving typ- medications? Why? Do you use neeses, no Collateral, and No Up- 
Albuterol (Proventil, Ventolin), Front Fee. Call 1-800-660-0608 
Ipratropium (Atrovent), Mela- (10-6 EST) Arkwood Sen/ices, 
proterenol (Alu'pent), or other nebu- 
Dnver OTR COVENANT TRANS- lizer mediations? Call Express Med ALL MALE CHAT LINE phvateeon- 
PORT West Coast Runs. $1,000 1-800-290-6442. necMons.BuHetin Board. (800)776- 

Sign-On Bonus lor Experienced 6253, $1.25/min. VISA/MC 

Dnvers.HealthA.lfe Insurance Avail- DIABETIC? Ate you still paying tor (900)537-6266,S1.6Wmin.16tNPP 
able First Day On Truck Experi- supplies? Why? For information on Reno, NV. Gralner Adv. 250 New- 
enced Drivers, Owner Operators how you can receive supplies at little port Center Dr., Newport Beach, 
and Teams Call 1-800-441-4394 or no cost call 1-800-678-5733. CA 92660 
Graduate Students Call 1 -800-338- 

6428. ABSOLUTE AUCTION-DUBLIN GAR- JIM PALMER TRUCKING. Teams 

MENT CO., April 17 in Dublin, VA »% Team Up With The 11 Team In 
Swimming Pool's $887 New 1997 77,554 Sq. Ft. building on 4 6 acres Truckjng Today We Are The Good 
Factory Left Over Model's. Hugh and all apparel manulacturing equip- Looking Fleet CALL 1 -800-755- 
l9'X3l'X4'Deep. ComesComplete meni In excellent condition. For a 9458. 
With Giant Size Sun Deck, Safety complete listing, call Fax-on-demand 

Fence, In Pool Ladder, Liner, Fil- 540-344-7297 Doc No 264 or visit Drivers - Virginia's Best Kept Se- 
ler. Pump & Motor Installation and our web site at: httpi/www wollz com cret Keeps Getting Better! Great 
Financing Available No Bank- Wollz i Associates, Inc.: Brokers i pay, home most weekends, late 
ruptcy's Call 24 hra I- 800-447- Auctianeers(VAi321) Call800-55t- mod«leonv.,co.Paidheelthl Come 
7207. 3588. GrowWIthHARRISTRUCKINGCO. 

1-800-929-5003. 
WOLFF TANNING BEDS Solid ABSOLUTE AUCTION For Sergeant's 

steel, full body tanning beds. New/ Pel Products Selling: Forklifts, Air EXCEaE^rrPROFrrSLOQHOME 
Used Financing available. Forfree Compressor, Shop Equipment & WHOLESALERS- Join proven 18 
catelogcall: 1 -800-537-91 1 3-(804- Tools, Computer. Office, Lab Equip- yr. Log Manufacturer 16 Kiln-dried 
757 area code) 1-800-447.0040- ment. More! Thurs. April 23, 10 AM log styles starting $12,190.00 Ex- 
(540-703 area code) on Site 2258 Dartiytown Rd, Rich- elusive territory. Mr Buck 1-800- 

mond Call for Terms/Info. MACI 321-5647 Old Timer Log Homes. 
DONATE YOUR CAR. Heritage AUCTIONEERSINT'L.804.355-2100. 

ForlheBlind, Tax Deductible. Free V/kAL 11102. Drtvan, Eamupto34 5cpm. Dry 

Towing, Free Phone Card to Do- van & Flatbied All ConventkHial 

norsw/Ad«1285. 1 -800-2-Oanale. DRIVERS-OTR ADVANCE YOUR fleet No Slip sealing Great miles 
FLATBED CAREER WITH A.D.S.t Anderson Trucking Sen/ice. 800- 
DIABETICS (USING INSULIN) Did Phone Applicalions Approved in 2 241-8787. 
you know Medicare or ineurance Hours! $1,000 Sign-On Bonus! Morel 

covers most supplies? Save litoney- Call Today! 800-646-3438 Ext. 1015 Powerful Money Making CD-ROM 
Call 1 -800-234-4070. Liberty Medl- Owner Operators Welcome! with over 650 money making ideas, 

cal. Salislaction Guaranteed. No opportunities, and starter kits To 

HMO Members. LIVE FISH tor ponds. Over 32 Spe- order send $99 -f $8 Shipping and 

clesAvallatHe Colorful Catalog Upon Handling to: United Information, 
ATW,lncTr/TriDnvers All Teams, Request ZETTS FISH HATCHERY, 2700 S, Bro«J St., Chalfanooga, 
All EaslWesI All HoodCondos, Trip m 2 box 218K, Inwood, WV 25428 TN 37408 #70. 
Avorage5,eOOMiles,TopPayPack- (3(m) 229-3654 

age 600-948-6723. FORECLOSURE AUCTION-PRIME 

Pressure Cleaners Factory Olrecllll INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY, Mon. 
HOMEOWNERScallCommonPoinI Honda 2800 PSI $599, 3000 PSI April 6th, 2 PM On-Site, 800 W. 
Mortgage today and get the cash $699, 3500 PSI $799. 4000 PSI J999. Leigh SI . Richmond, VA OFFICE, 
you need. Eliminate high-interest 4500PSI$1449 CalM-600-931-9274, WAREHOUSE, 33,0OOW- Sq Ft, 
credit card debt, repair damaged 24 Hours, at 1-95. 1.92 Acres, Docks, M-1. 

credit or make home in^)rovement8. Call lor Into., Terms. MOTLEY'S 

1-800-968-2221 Driver-Earn up to $800 per week REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS, 804- 

your first year with USA TRUCK! 355-2100 VAAL »16 
ATW, Inc. Owner-Operator Teams Late-model conventionels with sal- 
All East/West, Earn $170,000 tp/ elllte, no slip seating and weekly pay DRIVERS WEEKEND TRAINING 
yr 800-948-6723. 800-237-4642. EOE M/F/HW lorTrwIorTraHerOriversnearRCH- 

PR1VACYHEDGE-Le.l.ndCyp.e« AUCTION-APRIL 15, office/retail ^"^Tg ^Tos OR 3 WeIIJs 
(Ev.rgreen)Fastgrowin9-Complele building in heart of downtown pgLL-TIMEShlpp.niCho«eofVA. 
pnvacy Spring liquidation 311 tree/ Roanoke, VA 21.500 Sq. Ft. on 3 i~ ..immwimrmt* 
.,„ „. . .„ „. „^„ op,„ ^^^,, ^p^^g p^, ^_ inc. 1 800W46 2374. 

tails, call Fax-on-demand 540-344- COOKWARE-Heavygauge, Dinner 
7297, Doc. 265, or visit our web site p,„y ,y,p,, ,00^ Walerteae I Sur- 

REFINANCE* SAVE$100sEACH lUSr^B^ok"™ » AucL* »-'•'•'"-"<"« '-O^. ""P^ 
MONTH With Today's Low Mort- ^^^LTaijT^ .M SS^ SmB "" *' "•"'•' *''*"'^ '^°'^ 

gage Rales Consolldale debt, im- "'' '^* "^" 800-551-3588. ^ oOl Free $75.00 cutlery set! 
prove your home or get needed DEBT CONSOLIDATION! Overdue '■™«™"»'™»'yl'-*'0^34-4628l 
cash with Falrbank Mortgage. -24- credit cards and other Wlls? Maxed .or « jMn unornaritc cact 
hourpre-approvals'Quick Closings out? Reduce payments lower 1!,V .J; d!^L ,,?!£., c™ 
■Compatilive Rales Custom Pro- mteresl slop collections avoid bank- ^^^J^^^,^""^-'^ 
gram. For Every Need 'Good » rupcy..r.store credit, confi-denlial. cZh^Z^.!^ 2«.Sl^ 
problem credit -No-Income Verifj. CCI 1-800-455-2227. Non-Profit i-TiL.?^ r J. . l2^ 

cation "SeH employed -Bankruptcy Bonded orl-800-2e9-1311 CrosstaleMort- 

• 1 25% Equity Financing We Bend '•D* 

Over Backwards To Approve Your DRIVERS OTR - FOR MAINLY MID- _ , _ 

Loan FAIRBANK MORTGAGE t- WEST - SOUTHEAST - SOUTH NO ''*»" ""''' "' '"'1' P«yn»nls 
800-346-5626 ext. 582 VA Lb ML NYC HOME OFTEN NO UNLOAD- '«•'*•<< •"»" annuities, insurance 
251 ING PAID WEEKLY ALL MILES 2 ••"•™n<». VSI, lotleries, military 

YEARS OTR WITH HAZMAT 800- P*"*""". seller-financed mort- 
DEPENDS(r), WINGS (r). Adult 896-81 18 OMAHA NE '•O**- "?'"■ Inherltanees. Best 

diapers at wholesale prices deliv- Pnces! 1-800-722-7472. Advance 

ered to your home. MEDICAID re- PUBLIC AUCTION - COMMON- Funding www.advanclund.com 
ciplents may be eligible to gel these WEALTH OF VIRGINIA * SATUR- 

product FREE! Can HomeCareDe- DAY • APRIL 4, 1998 ' 9 00 AM • NEWSPAPER ADVERTISING rep- 
livered 1-800- 565-5644. VIRGINIA TECH, OLD KMART '•"nialnre position open at com- 

BUILDING, 141 1 S MAIN STREET, munny daily newpeper Established 
MEDICARE RECIPIENTS are you BLACKSBUHG, VIRGINIA 3-1993 accounts, territory. Good salary, 
using a NEBULIZER MACHINE? SUNDANCE ' 1994 CROWN VIC - commission, benellls. Fax teller/ 
STI3Ppayinglullpricefor Albuterol, 1978 FORD P/U' CHEVROLET FLAT resume to Debbie, The Hopewell 
Alrovent.etc SolulBns.MEDKIARE BED W/LIFTGATE ' ROTO TILER - News 804-458-7556. 



regular $29 95 Now only $9 95 
Gtd and Free delivery - 1 -800-908- 
0496. 



(;ivf: THK 

(JlFTOl i.ni 



Suggest that memorial 
contributions be made 

to the Muscular 

Dystrophy Association 

and honor a loved one 

by helping a million 

Americans with 

neuromuscular ^ 

diseases. 




1-800-572-1717 



Hut tpmx pravideil m i |nMk leivkc. 



OT 



Virginia Beach Sun, Friday. Aptil 3. 1998 7 







Classifieds 



CALL TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 



HELP WANTED 



JOB OPPORTUNITY 



INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE 

Seeking experieinced mechanical 
and electrical techniciansfor evening 
and graveyard shifts. Positions re- 
quire routine equipment mainte- 
nance, responding to breakdowns, 
and troubleshooting and repair of 
manufacturing equipment and re- 
lated systems and controls. Com- 
petitive pay, career growth opportu- 
nrtles and comprehensive benefits 
package that includes medical, den- 
tal, prescriptions, eye care,- educa- 
tional assistance, 401 K, and many 
other outstanding features. Send 
resume to Brenco, Inc. John Sheffeld, 
POBox389, Petersburg, VA23804. 

4/9 



RAILROAD EMPLOYMENT High 
paying entry level position. For com- 
plete guide to over 75 major Rail- 
roads send $19.95 check or money 
ordertoBC Trading Co., 13618 Hull 
Street Road, Suite 116, Midlothian, 
VA23112. 
_^ m 

1000's POSSIBLE TYPING PART- 
TIME AT HOME Toll Free (1) 800- 
218-9000 Ext T-15385 for listings. 

4/10 

PSYCHOLOGIST - PARTTIME 

Salaried position. Clinical psychoto- 
gist in VA to conduct evaluations and 
provide group and individual therapy 
to residents of assisted living homes. 
Position in Chesapeake, VA. Fax 
VITAE to Counseling & Rehabilita- 
tion Servces 703-425-6020orcall 1 - 
800-688-7733. 

4/3 



GREAT 2ND CAREERS National 
company seeks a few individuals 
getting ready to retire/separate. Ex- 
cellent income $28-$42,000/yr. Plus 
working with military families. For 
interview call Mr. Sullivan at 460- 
4010. 

4/24 

ROOFERS NEEDED up to $15/hr. 
experienced only need apply. Nags 
Head NO. 919-441-3405. 

4/24 



MOBILE HOMES /SALE 



ELIZABETH CITY - MARCH MAD- 
NESS SALE All singlewides, $2500 
off. Limited time only . At Luv Homes 
919-338-3113. 

4/17 



OFFICE SPACE 



RAISE YOUR FAMILY AND RAISE 
YOUR INCOME with Discovery Toys. 
Fun, Flexible, Homebased business. 
Call Coleen - 804-384-8824. 

4^ 



HOMES /SALE 



3 BDR, 1-1/2 BATH, 2471 sq ft home 
with garage at 1513 McDaniel St 
Needs work $51 ,950 w/sellerfinanc- 
ing, offers considered. Call Eddie. 
Property Sales dept., 1-800-757- 
9201, ext 2033 (Pacific Time). 

4/3 

I ■' l!< B' JUU. 1,11.. . 1 I I 

COUNTRY UVING Private 5 acres. 
3 BR 2 BATH Rancher between 
Emporia and Lawrenceville. Best buy 
at $79,500. George Robinson, Coun- 
try Property Specialist 804-949-7837 
Robinson Realty 1-800-998-8711. 
4/24 

SAWYERS CREEK LANDING-NC 

3 miles from Camden Courthouse on 
Sawyer's Creek Road. Call David 
Sawyer at 919-453-4456. 

4/17 



NC-NEW HOMES! We have them 
under construction at all times. Call 
for current information. 919-264- 
3373. Hurdle & Webb Construction 
Company. 4/1 7 



2 BR, 2 BA ■ ELIZABETH CITY 

Remodeled kitchen & bath. $49,900. 
Call 91 9-333-1 168. 

4/17 

GOV'T FORECLOSED homes from 
pennies on $1. Delinquent .Tax, 
Repo's. REO's Your area. Toll free 
(1 ) 800-9000 Ext H 1 5385 for current 
listings. 

4/17 



INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 



BOXCARS/FLATCARS 1 4 Boxcars 
for sale. Great for onsrte storage, 
offices, etc. 1 3 f latcars for sale. Cou W 
be used for bridges, etc. Please call 
and leave message for details. 1- 
864-422-1128. South Carolina. 

4/17 



JOB OPPORTUNITY 



3 



HELP WANTED Men/Women earn 
$375 weekly processing/assembling 
Medcal I. D. Cards at home. Imme- 
diate openings. Your tocal area. Ex- 
perience unnecessary, will train. Call 
Medfcard at 1-541-386-5290. exi. 
7174-A. 
___^ 4/24 

BACKERS CANDY ROUTE 50 lo- 
cations. $800-1200 solid monthly 
inosme. Cost $2995. Hurry this woni 
iasti 1-800-459-3332. 

4/10 

FREE I yySK»i ft PRESCRIPTION 

(^ugsoo\^rag« with dental ptan.25% 
• ^)% discourMs. $15.00 mwth - 
Entire Hpus#held. $9,00 month • In- 
dividuals. REPRESENTATIVES 
^CEI^D No Insurance license or 
•xpenence requred (757) 487-401 0. 

4/17 



ORIGINATORS Need 2 experienced 

originators. New company in Chesa- 
peake. Fax only; 547-4505. Contact 
James Stamps. 
4/24 

CO-AUTHORTTYPIST - Three his- 
torical novels, one open. History and 
computer majors preferred. Movie 
Rights. Call 362-4704 for informa- 
tion. 



AVON! Full and part-time help 
needed. MLM option is available. Up 
to 50% profits. Call 1 -800-565-8801 . 

4/17 



NEWINEUZABETHCITYHalstead 

Blvd. Professional and Executive 
Center. 880 Sq. Ft. and up. Call 91 9- 
338-3453 or 919-331-2080. 

4/17 



PETS 



ENGLISH MASTIFF PUPS AKC, 
parents on premises. 804-769-3286! 
www.st-bernard.corp. 
4/3 

LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPS 

Knotts Island family raised. Well 
cared for. Shots & wormed .paper 
trained. Ready April 10, $300. Call 
429-9225 (evenings) Local call. 

4/10 



LOTS FOR SALE 



LOTS FOR SALE - ELIZABETH 
CITY, Forrest Park, Peartree Place, 
Rivenivood. Gene Meads. 919-338- 
6354. 4;, 7 



HALF DOBERMAN / HALF 
ROTTWEILLER puppies. Available 
now! $95.00 each. Nags Heaad,NC 
1-800-498-4706. 

4/10 



HORSES & CATTLE 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



ARENAS AND BARNS Factory 
Deals from 24 x 36 to 70 x 150. Will 
deliver, can put up. Must order by 
April 30th. Call DawW at (757) 877- 
2693. 



QUALITY BOARD LESSONS train- 
ing and sales. Happy Valley Eques- 
trians Center. 3/27 



PALOMINO MARE QUARTER 

horse $3200. Tennessee Walker 10 
yrs. $2000. Arabian Mare pony, 
$1500. including all tacks. Call 887- 
0120. 3/27 



SADDLERY 

QUIET SHOPPE SADDLERY 

English Riding Apparel & Equipment- 
Horse & Fox Gifts-Antiques, 
In Churchland 483-9358. 
Wed-Sat 10am -5pm. 

4/10 



MODELS 



NEED A LOAN 

Try consolidatif^. One tow monthly 
payment. 1-800-533-4485. Feder- 
ated Financial Servk:es. 

\ 4/24 

UNIQUE SERVICES INC. Lteensed. 
Let us save your time and money. 
We'll arrange housekeeping, child/ 
elder care, shopping, complete par- 
ties, office support, etc. etc. Please 
call 757-451-1469. 4/24 



CHESSON TRANSFER 

Insured Carriers 
20 years experience 
Home/Office Moving 
Pianos 

Tidewater area 
Free estimates 
1844AlantisAve. 
Chesapeake, VA 545-1793 



4/10 



MODELS/ACTORS Wanted. Metro 
Modeling is seeking models and ac- 
tors for print & commercial work. Call 
518-8164 for an interview. 

3/1 3R 



RECIPES 



Place your classified ad 
today. Call 547-4571. 



DELICIOUS FAMILY CHICKEN 

recipe. Mail money order $2.50 to: 
R. Pugh 6305 Ardsley SO, #201 A 
Virginia Beach, VA 23464. 

4/10 



APTS/ FURNISHED 



( ^^^^ 


' "v ''■ 


\msm 


cartful 


\^^^ 


^-^J 




ONE BEDROOM APARTMENTS 

Furnished and Unfurnished. Ctose 
to Little Creek and NOB Bases. Call 
Jeff/Gwen at 430-9392 or 430-9079. 

4/24 



With U.S. Savings Bonds, 

the more yon give, 

the more yon receive. 




fnerlcaVAUI. 






Every day, we pass a little 
of ounel ves on lo the next 
generation. Wli« penpectjve 
mems, when to u.se a fan 
bnjsli, whicti cviors blend for 
■d perfect autumn landKapc. 
where to highlight. The 
knowledge that we give slays 
with (hem forever, 

Givit^ VS. Savinp Bon^ 
also pntet an important 
letMo on to the iiituR 
ieimttkm. Booth cm teadi 
om cMkSrm how to save, 
how ii^n^ powt md bow a 
unall invetunem can he^ 
mafce dim dreamt (xxne tnc. 

Buyi^ U.S. Savings Btmb 
axmbimsmuttMuii 
secure AmevM for 
fMSMioni to come. What a 
P^ way for you to lay. > 

"I believe in your fmmtr 

BooA are at ^gy lo buy m 
tey««lop«». B^AMDtt 
iMtf dMff face vahie Arai^ 
yow tori tank. 

So Mare te ndiiion tf 
U J. Sm^p loHk. 'Aqr'ie 
*e pft *M 1^ tadt moR 
ta* yw'«« pVM. 



EMmetaf ttiiii 



# 



ARVON 



Home Health Care 

We have an 
immediate need for: 

• RN'« •TOMPANIONS 
'•LPN'S •NURSE AIDES 

• CNA'S 

Flexible hours in homecare 
staffing and private duty. We 
offer the best pay and benefits! 

• HOMECARE 

• STAFFING 

• PRIVATE DUTY 

Call 4/?l/0M Staffing at 

499-9900 

for an appointment today! 

We also offer a 

Certified Nursing Aide Program 

call for more information. 



RN ■ Full-Tlme, Baylor, PRN 

Due to the rapid growth of our 
Brm^kto Honw KfinKh Cw* of- 
fk» we currently have immedi«rte 
needs for Full-time and Baylor RN 
to work in our Dinwiddie tocatbn. 
Candidate must have 1 year of 
home health experience and 2 
years of Medical Surgkal experi- 
ence. To apply, please fax your re- 
sume to (804) 4«»-'33M w call 
(604) 469-3361 Pr».«niploynMnt 
drug scTMn nqutrtL kiX. 



Home Health Aide 

Brookside Home Health 
Care has immediate needs 
for HHA in our Dinwiddie 
location. Please call (804) 
4W0362 for immediate Job 
assignments. Pre-employ- 
ment drug screen required. 
EOE. 




MERGE 



When we all work together, 
great things can happen. 



Muscular Dystrophy Association 
1-800-572-1717 



Industrial Maintenance 

Manufacturer of precision steel products for tlie railroad 
and automotive industries seei<s experienced individu- 
als to join our IVIaintenance team. 

•Mechanical Technicians: Two-year technical degree or 
three-years experience in repair and maintenance of 
machine tools, multi-craft is a plus. Ability to trouble- 
shoot and repair CNC's, AC/DC servo positioning sys- 
tems, hydraulic/pneumatic systems, robotics and other 
automatic systems and controls. Read blueprints and 
schematics and use precision tools and instrumenta- 
tion. 

•Electrical Technicians: Two-year technical degree or 
three-years experience in electrical maintenance and 
repair of machine tools. Requires strong troubleshoot- 
'iliS,?5i"?, ^"^ •'^P^i'' and maintenance ofCNC controls, 
AC/DC drives, programmable controllers, and various 
tyf^s of servo positioning systems. Read blueprints and 
schematics and use electronic test equipment. 

Shift work, stable employment, competitive pay, and com- 
prehensive benefits package that includes medical, den- 
^?A:^,y^ ^^''®' Pi'escription di^ugs, educational assistance, 
401K, and many other outstanding features. Send your 
resume in confidence to: 

Brenco Inc. 

John Sheffield 

P.O. Box 389 

Petersburg, VA 23804 



AUCTION SALE 

AUIOMOBIIE REPOSSESSIONS 



BB&T 

Bank of Tidewater 

Life Savings Bank 

Chrysler Financial Corp. 

Aufolnfo Finance of Va, Inc. 

Union Finance 

Naval Supply Center FCU 

NN Shipyard Employee CU 

Aufo Credit of Virginia 

SATURDAY, 

Approximately 750 



BY ORDER OF 

Crestar Bank 

Central Fidelity Bank 

N.A.E. FCU 

Signet Bank 

Old Point National Bank 

Franklin Acceptance Bank 

Consumer Finance Co. 

Langley FCU 

First Advantage FCU 

APRIL 4™, 1998 

Vehicles Expected For Sale 
PARTIAL UST 



Chevy Chose FSB 
First Union Bonk 
First Virginia Bank 
Americredit Finoncial Sarvicas 
First Enterprise Acceptance 
First Merchants Acceptance 
Guardian FCU 
Navy Yard CU 
Mercury Finance 

• 10:00 A.M. 

Including Consignments 



98 Ford WIndstar Van GL 

97 Mitsubishi Galant ES 

97 Plymouth Breeze 

97 Honda Civic U 

97 Chevrolet Cavalier 

97 Pontiac Firebird 

97 Dodge Neon 

97 Pontiac Bonneville SE 

97 Kia Sephia RS 

97 Dodge Dakota X-Cab 

Truck 

97 Chevrolet SIO Truck 
97 Nissan Truck XE 
97 Mazda B2300 X-Cab 

Truck 
97 Ford Expedition E.B. 

4WD 

97 Isuzu Rodeo S 2WD 
97 Suzuki Sidekick JX 

HTop 4WD 
97 Suzuki Sidekick JS 

HTop 2WD 

97 Geo Tracker Conv. 2WD 
96 Nissan Sentra GXE 
96 Mercury Cougar XR7 
96 Honda Accord LX 
96 Chevrolet Monte Carlo 

LS 

96 Mitsubishi Mirage S 
96 Ford Escort LX 
96 Chevrolet Cavalier 
96 Pontiac Grand Prix SE 
96 Ford Thunderbird LX 
96 Chevrolet Corsica 
96 Hyundai Accent 
96 Geo Metro 
96 Chevrolet ISOO X-Cab 



Truck 4WD 

96 Ford F150 Truck XLT 
96 Chevrolet 3500 

Cheyenne Truck 4WD 
96 Ford Ranger X-Cab Track 

XLT 

96 Dodge Dakota Truck SLT 
96 Mazda B23(M) Truck 
96 Geo Tracker Conv. 2WD 
96 Plymouth Grand Voyacar 

VanSE 

95 Mercury Mystique LX 
95 Nissan 240 SX 
95 Pontiac Fir^rd Fbnnula 
95 MitsuMsM Giriant ES 
95 Pontiac Grand AM SE 
95 Dodge Avenger ES 
95 Ford Escort LX S/W 
95 Subaru impran L 
95 Hyundai tecmt 
95 Mercury Tracer 
95 Buick Roadmaster 
95 Chevrolet Beretta 
95 Hyundai Elantra 
95 Acura inte|^ RS 
95 Ford Escort U 
95 Geo Metro 
95 Toyota Taeoira Truck SX 

4WD 
95 Mitsubishi M^rty Max 

Track 

95 Ford F150 Truck XL 
95 Chevrolet SlOTruck 
95 Jeep Grand Cherokee 

Laredo 4WD 
95 Isuzu Rodeo 4WD 
95 Jeep Wrangler Rio 



Grande 4WD 
95 Chevnriet Lmnlna \ten 

APV 

95 Dodge Cwavan SE 
94 Chevrolet Camaro 
94 Pontiac Grand AM SE 
94 Ford ThundertiM U 
94 ChevnMet Bor^ta 
94 Masan Switra LE 
94 Chovratot Cavalier 
94 Rml Tempo GL 
94 Hyumlal Elantra 
94 Chevrolet SIO X-Cab 

Track LS 

94 Fwd Rai«OT Truck XIT 
94 Ford F150 Truck XL 
94 Dodge Dakota Sport 

Truck 
94 Chevrolet 020 HITop 

Coiiv.)tan 
94 Ford Aerostar Ext. Vm 

XU 
93 Chevrolet Caprice 

Classh: 
93 Honda Accord EX 
93 Toyota Torcol OX 
93 Chwrroiet CavaNer RS 
93 Pontiac SwMrd LE 
93 Tofota Corolla DX 
93 Fwd Taunn GL 
93 Hyundai Sonata 
93 Ea0a Takm OL 
93 Ford Muatong LX 
93 Hyundai Bantra 
93 FOrd Escort LX 
93 F<mi Rw^er S|4art 



Track 

93 Toyota Track 
93 Ford Ran^ Truck XLT 
93 Ford Awoatar Van XL 
92 Honda CMC 
92 NHtauMaM Qrtant LS 
92 Fold Tampo GL 
MDodga Shadow 
92 INwia Protage LX 
92 Geo Metro 
92 Ntean Track XE 
92 FOrd Ranger Track XLT 
92 Nissan Pathfinder SE 

4WD 

91 Pontiac FMMrd 
SlMaaanSOOZX 
91 MItoidiiaM 3000 GT 
91 Pontiac Grand AM LE 
91 Chavrcrtat 9L0 Blazer 

Tahoa4WD 
90 Tqrota Camry 
90 Chovrx^t Conk» LT 
89 Chrysler LaBartm 
88 Toyota (^mry 

SPECIALS 

*USMAWSMAlSSBIVICg' 

97 MERCroiS 42(« 
B6 HONDA ACCORD 



BOAT sp«:iiu.s 



95 Sunbird Neptune 230 Walkaround Boat w/8.0 LItar Volvo SX Cobra 1.0. & 95 Venture Traitor 

94 Maxum 2000SC Runabout Boat w/4.3 U Mercniiser (V6} 1.0. & 94 Escort Trailar 

93 Maxum 2700 SCR Cabbi Cnrisar "27 ft" w/Mercwy 1.0. 0.B. & (to TraNar 



SPiCIAL NOTICE: Green Gtfford Motor Corp. wilt tefbi MWng MM* Mtoct trade^n A UMd car Invantory at 9:30 A.M. 
• Salvage & Machanlcal Problam VaMdM Mm Be Offered For Sale ieghmta at 9:iS A.M. 



SnECUILS 



Aulfi Ma ^ Vifginia, Ir^ wHI ba oMoiing m approjAMte 50 repona^ons 1m airta. 
Wide variety of vrtilclas to a^act how (1^ throi^ 1997 modate). 



1 



C 



ExiMcting 125-175 VaMiHaa Fhm Ucal Now te Dtitor 



General 

Public 

Welcome 



Inspection Friday • 11 AM-4 PM 

Some cars may be red.eamed, added or pulled prior to sola. 

Sale day annovncements take 

precedence over all others. 

Cosh Deposit required on all 

purchases on day of sale - ($200-$600) 



J 



All 
Sales 
Final! 



Buchanan Auction Company 

3856 S. Military Highway, Chesapeake 

VA/AF 000123 ' 757-485-3342 



p^F"^*^^^^^^^^^^^ 



mrngmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



mmmmm 



S Viisinia Beach Sun, Friday. ^>ril 3, 1998 






• h 








Pholo»birAun»Kiik 

BANNER YEAR. Turtle Bay, time-share condominiums being con- 
structed on 6th Street betvwen Atlantic and Pacific avenues, is one 
sign of growtfi at the Beach. 



1997 record tourism 
year at the Beach 

Continued From Page 1 

$527 million, plus $569 million 
in indirect spending totaled 
nearly $1.1 billion in visitor 
^)ending in the region. 

Employment also received a 
boost as 11,438 direct jobs and 
5,776 jobs were supported in the 
region as a result of the record- 
setting year. 

"I think it was a remarkable year 
— everything was up," said James 
R. Ricketts, directs of the Depart- 
ment of Convention and Visitor 
Development. "The weather was 
perfect, the product is changing, 
and people are returning because 
they like what they see." 

For example, Canadians are 
coming back in record numbers, 
Ricketts said. 

In addition, 75 percent of all 
tourists are repeat visitors and 80 
percent plan to come back. 

Ricketts expects that trend to 
continue with new hotel 
opportunities at 31 Street, 
Sandbridgeandan upscale hotel in 
the Pembroke area. There are also 
the Turtle Bay time-share 
condominiums going up on 7lh 
Street. 

"We are starting to hit the market 
niches," he said. "We're right 
where we should be." 

He also credited the sponsplex, 
area golf courses, and packages that 
offer day trips to special attractions 
such as the Virginia Marine 
Science Museum and Busch 
Gardens as big drawing cards to die 
area. 

Martha Grant, account supervisor 
for Barker Campbell Farley and 
MansHeld, also provided a glimpse 
of the marketing strategies die 
Virginia Beach uses to entice 
tourists. 

"We advertise good, clean family 
fun," she said. 

The colorful slick ads go in 
travel magazines, vacation guides, 
newspapers and on television. 



WHAT IF. With all the new con- 
struction going on in the resort 
city, middle school student Chris 
Bain poses an interesting ques- 
tion with a sculpture at the Con- 
temporaiy Art Center of Vii^nia. 

They promote Virginia Beach as 
"It's a lot like California. It's 
nothing like California." 

There is also a special promotion 
for Canadian visitors written in 
French and English. Canadians can 
come to Virginia Beach and their 
currency is "at par," Grant said. 

"They can come to Virginia 
Be^h and it isn't going to cost 
them anymore than in Canada," 
she explained. 

In keeping up with technology, 
the city will also soon have a web 
site where visitors can make travel 
arrangements. 

Officials say it is hard to predict 
the tourist season for 1998. 
Expenses are expected to go up and 
down. There will be added 
expenses Oiis year widi die new sea 
wall, new parking garage, hurricane 
protection plan, and maintenance. 
City official and businesses arc 
keeping their fingers crossed and 
hoping for anodier record year. 



Fund-raisers fake dive 



Continued From Paoe 1 

For instance, Virginia Beach- 
based Worrell Brothers Restaurant 
brought a team comprised of 
almost 20 staff members to die 
pool after work at 2 a.m. Saturday 
for a stint underwater, keeping 
Eubank and Widen occupied with a 
card game — fish. 

Worrell Brothers played such an 
active role in the event because 
restaurant founder Chris Wwrell 
died from |»ncreatic cancer. 

"For us to pull togedier for die 
memory of Chris Worrell was just 
natural," said Virginia Beach's 
Denise Montini, a waitress at 
Worrell. "That's why Worrell crnic 



out and made such a statement." 

Brigit Belcher's message was 
more subtle. About 10 percent ol 
die internist's patients have cancer, 
so she chipped in by collecting 
pledges topping $600. 

"I've never done diis before, and I 
treat so many people with cancCT," 
said Belcher, a Virginia Beach 
resident. "It's great to help a little 
bit." 

The event may have attracted 
more participants and raised moK 
money than last year because it 
stands apart from so many other 
fund raisers, according to Daisy 
Cohan, who works for the city's 
Department of Convention and 
Visitor Development. 




^^f^*^ ^- "ci wNIPwIt, Brantfofi Day, Denise MomM Md Mar- 

Kv^t Ml H tas^raMM^ GMknlt wMi OtvM MMm mb JmF bh 

lii Mit Ar A Cm. Ito fciiNilw for ttt Afflertmi Cmom' fed^ 
««i taMM l^Hrimw mm Cm^ ^ to • mrnvmr to tht Mty 
far yfi M 1^ M41. 



Vigil remembers tiniest victims 



Contlnuod From Pag« l 

designated as National Child 
Abuse Prevention month and 
social agencies will be saturating 
the public with information on 
what abuop '<! tins for children, 
support and education for iKtrents, 
and die role of the community. 

"In diis area, we have the highjzst 
rate of abuse and neglect per c^ita 
in die state," Duggan said. • 

The reasons are similar to most 
of die county 

"We have a transient population 
here," she explained. "Many come 
here looking for jobs in a high- 
density resort area, and don't find 
the jobs of their dreams. Many are 
stressed out and some arc on drugs. 
And some carry on generational 
abuse." 

Unfortunately, Duggan's 
organization usually becomes 
involved after a child is abused. 
CAS A volunteers are court- 
appointed to be advocates for die 
children in court. The advocate 
interviews virtually everyone 
involved widi the child and reports 
back to the court. 

"We are diere to tell the judge 
objectively what is going on with 
die child," Duggan said. "It's a 
safety net for the child as many 
times the child is very young or 
very frightened. The volunteers are 
someone who can stand up in court 
and speak to the child's best 
interests." 

Duggan said prevention is die 
best cure for child abuse. She 



suggested community involvement 
by using the "good neighbor 
approach," and caring what happens 
in die community. 

"Be aware of the children mx)und 
you," she said. "For example, if a 
child is continually left 
unsupervised, you can call Social 
Services and don't have to give 
your name." 

In addition, Duggan suggested 
people offer to help dieir 
neighbors, such as a mother who 
needs a break from her children. 

"Offer to baby-sit for an hour," 
she said. 

Bill Boyce, recreation program 
coordinator for the Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks snd 
Recreation, also believes in 
community involvement and 
attended the candlelight vigil. 

"I love children," he said. "I run 
a before- and after-school 
playground program for 4,500 to 
4,600 kids." 

He recommends wholesome, 
structured activities for children. 

Boyce said his program is in all 
53 Virginia Beach Elementary 
Schools, offering activities two 
hours before school in the morning 
and from 3 to 6 p.m. after school. 
He also oversees a summer 
program for children. There is a 
modest cost for the program, but 
Boyce gave 1,100 fee waivers this 
year to parents who could not 
afford it. 

Terry Cantone, recreation 
specialist II and her two children 
Jason 11, and Christine 9, also 




IN MEMMY. Jason Cantone, 11, helps light candles for the Virginia 
children who died or were injured at the hands of their abuses. 



attended the ceremony. Jason and 
Christine helped light the candles. 

"It was sad," Jason said. 

Cantone explained die abusers to 
her children as "people who did not 
walk away and count to 10." She 
also urged people to be involved in 
die community. Even if someone 
is new to die community, they can 
still find die help and support diey 
need, she said. 



"Network with other parents and 
get involved widi the local school. 
There is lots of support out diere 
— all you have to do is ask," die 
said. 



Fot more information on 
volunteering with CASA or 
information on preventing child 
abuse call. 548-0390. 




Let's face it, when it comes to car repair, 
too many folks take the "if it ain't broke, don't 
fix it" approach. Which probably explains why 
so many cars on the road today have shock 
absorisers or struts in need of replacing. 

That's because shock absorbers seldom 
"break". Instead, they wear out gradually over 
time. So gradually, that many drivers fail to 



realize just how worn their shocks have 
become. Well the fact is, driving around on a 
set of worn out shocks is just not safe. 

So keep that in mind the next time you're 
out and about. You might just want to drop by 
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Friday, Apit 10, 199i 



VIRGINIA SIACH NE^ and VIEWS 



•Hoppy* Easter 

Easter Eggslravaganza will have you hopping 
towards the beach this Easter weekend Puppet 
shows, face painters, wacky balloon hats, even 
the Easter Bunny will be at the 24th Street 
Park from noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 
Sunday. Take a jump in the enormots 
"Moonwalk" or create your own Easter basket. 
This event is free. The magic of Spectrum 
Puppets will come alive at 3 p.m. each day, 
and don't miss the special appearances from the 
Easter Bunny. This event is sponsored by tfic 
>-ity of Virginia Beach and Beachevents. 



Spring fling 



Enjoy a spring fling at the Virginia Beach 
Farmer's Market, 3640 Dam Neck Rd., on 
Saturday, April 18 from noon to 4 p.m. Take 
part in hayrides, children's amusements a«l 
activities, musical entertainment and more. 
Pick out the season's first fresh local pixxluce, 
plants and herbs. Take a seminar from a 
gardening expert Frank Orr on contima 
gardening. For more information call the 
Virginia Beach Farmer's Market, 427-4395. 



Wine Fest 

The second annual 24th Street Spring Wme 
Fest presented by Farm Fresh is scheduled fiar 
Saturday and Sunday, April 18-19, at the 24th 
Street Park in Virginia Beach. If you've been 
cooped up all winter and need a breath of firesh 
air, this casual, down to earth affair on the 
oceanfront is just what the doctor ordered. 
Attendees can purchase a package which 
includes an event wine glass and eight taste 
tickets for $15 at the door. Proceeds benefit 
local Virginia Beach charitable organizations. 
Continuous free entertainment will be 
programmed on the 24th Street Stage. For 
more information call, 491-6539, or 491- 
SUNN. 



Partners in Art 



^. 



^ 



h 



The Old Coast 
Guard Station at 
24th Street and 
Atlantic Avenue 
in Virginia Beach 
will present m- ' |ffl^ T 

exhibit of art by *'* - .^- - 

students at Link-horn Park Elementary School 
and Thalia Elementary School, both parincre 
with the museum in the Adopt-A-School 
program. The exhibit, which runs April 14 to 
May 17, is included with museum admission. 
The museum is opoj Tuesday through Saturtlay 
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and from noon to 5 
p.m. on Sunday. Admis;sion is $2.50 for 
adults, $2 for military and senior citizens and 
$1 for young people aged 6 to 18. Museum 
membCTs receive free admission. 



Volunteers needed 

Volunteers are needed for the annual West 
Neck Creek cleanup on Saturday, April 18 
from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Also needed are John 
boats, canoes, chain saws, rope, come-alongs 
and pole nets. For information or to v(rfimtecr 
call, Lilly Gilbert. 431-8566. This event is 
qxMisored in pan by Clean The Bay Day aid 
the Virginia Beach Clean Community 
Commission. 



PTA scholarship 

The Green Run Etementary School PTA is 
offering two scholarehips for graduating high 
school seniors — Philip J. McLar^ 
Scholar^ mid tte Barbara Eward Scholadiip. 
The de^llinc fffl- these scholarships is Ajail 30. 
Applications are available at Green Run 
Elementary School or at any high school 
guittance office. 



High Frequency 

High Frequency Wavelengths, a jrofrasiaial 
danceAheatre company based in Hampim 
Roffils. indents "Dances of Hslassah." This 
pHfonnsK^ iMings to Virginia B^ch works (tf 
I major dance artist of the 20th centtry. 
Hadassah (1909-1992) was a pioneer in 
bringing the daiKa of ImUa, Java, Bali aid 
Israel to the Amo^ui stage. Tlw c(xn|wiy it 
ctmendy prodiiciag a docwnentaiy to praerve 
her woric. The evoiing tiKlucfes a talk and video 
acieeung, recently pnaaaeA at Lincoln Ctmer, 
New York City, in honor of HadMift's 
contributions to American dance hoio^ 
Gi^ Mistt bom New York City will perfonn 
Riday. AptU 24 at 7 p.m. and Smday, April 
26 at 2 p.m. at Koni^ville Playhtme. ttO 
MonnKMith Ln. AdmissiMi ii SIS fot i 
$7 ttKkMits m^ s^uofs. 



70mYMr 




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^^VW*^ 




Handl-ride service taxing 

tion budget 



to transpo 

Council concerned that misuse 
is driving up costs to the Beach 



By Lee Cahtll 

City Council Reporter 

The increasing use of handi-rides, the 
home pick-up service run by TRT 
(Tidewater Regional Transit), has 
esoiMod costs to the extent that 40 
percoMcrf' the city's public transportation 
subsidy is applied to handi-rides. 

That's $666,031 of the total $1.47 
local subsidy for mass transportation. 
Tliis represents a 29 percent increase over 
the current year. 

At a budget workshop Tuesday council 
expressed concern that the service, which 
has more liberal parameters in the beach 
than the law requires, is being misused 
by individuals which is driving the use 
£Uid the subsidies up. 

E. Dean Block, directorof management 
and the budget, however, diqjelied 
rumors that the service was being 
reduced. He said "nothing is being cut to 
my knowledge." 

He said, however, that the subsidy is 
more consumed by the handi-ride service 



Immunization 
project needs 
helping boost 

HOPE for Kids 
seelcs volunteers 

By Margaret WIndley 

Corraspondant 

HOPE for Kids could use a shot in the 
arm by way of a few good volunteers. 

On April 18 the organization leader in 
the push for childhood immunizations is 
holding a rally at Mount Trashmore for 
childhood immunizations. 

After a 9 a.m. pep rally with mayoral 
proclamations for Infant Immunizations 
Week, 400 volunteers will go out to 
canvas neighborhoods in Virginia Beach, 
Portsmouth, Norfolk, Chesapeake, 
Hampton and Newport News with 
important information about children's 
immunizations. 

"By the time children are 2 years old, 
they should have had five series of 
immunizations," said Kim Versage of 
HOPE for Kids. "They need them at 2, 4 
and 6 months, at 12 to 15, and 15 to 18 
months." 

However, she said, many parents don't 
keep their children's immunizations up to 
date. 

According to the last published study, 
the state's rate of childhood 
immunizations is 74 percent. The 
Virginia Beach rate is further down at 68 
percent. While low, these rates are much 
better than the national rate of 47 
percent. A new study with new 
information is coming out soon and may 
reflect higher percentages. 

Sm hope. F^s^ 8 



and has reached a point where the 
subsidized cost of a ride is $11, m 
increase of $5 from four or five years 
ago. 

Councilwoman Barbara Henley sakl 
she would like council to know what the 
criteria for qualifying for handi-rides are. 

Planning Director Robert Scott said 
that the city has an ongoing problem 
with handi-ride and the situation is 
getting worse all the time. 

He said that he would not recommend 
removing service from areas of the city, 
but "people are using the service who aro 
not eligible under the law." He said that 
the guicfelines are being reviewed to make 
sure the public cost is contained and the 
purpose ftilfilled. 

Mayor Meyera Obemdorf said she heanl 
from one source that one individual was 
using handi-ride to go to work. 

Henley said that the way the law is 
written para transportation has to be 
provided a certain distance from a fixed 
public transportation route. "We've 



always done far more than the law 
provides," she said. 

Block said the city has been extremely 
liberal and is searching a point where tlw 
service is tripling in cost. 

According to I^le Casicllow, 
transportation planner, in 1993 what 
Congress adopted the Americans with 
Disabilities Act, the Federal Transit 
Administration enacted new guidelines 
regarding the provision and operation of 
fixed route transit and parairansit services 
in metropolitan areas. 

The changes focused on particular 
areas, the first being regulations requiring 
all vehicles to be equi^jed with lifts and 
other devices intended to make them 
accessible for disabled riders and the 
second which prescribes minimum 
service levels for paratransit services. 
These regulations mandated that 
metropolitan transit organizations 
provide paratransit services within 3/4 
mile of any fixed bus route and maintain 
the same hours of operation as fixed 
route bus services. Also the paratransit 
riders must meet certain disability criteria 
and get^aphic requirements. 

A transfer of operations was intended, 
but this has not h^jpened according to 



staff research. For many people with 
disabilities urt»n/suburt»n bus service at 
current funding levels is a very difficult 
mo(te of transportation and the panatiansil 
van remains the only real option. 

Also, in most suburban communities, 
such as Virginia Beach, people do noi 
live within three-fourths of a mile trf a 
fixed bus route. Here, transit mates 
follow most major arterials in the 
northern half of the community and arc 
essentially nonexistent in the soudion 
half. 

Therefore, Council in 1994 
apfvofniated an additicmal $60,000 for 
handi-ride services in the "option" or 
non-mandatory service area which 
encompasses the entire city limits 
outside the three-fourths mile mandiHOfy 
service area. In Chesapeake, the optional 
service area is limited to certain sectkMB 
of the community. 

Castellow said that the total subsidy 
required for handi-ride has actually 
increased faster than the city's share but 
agency revenues have offset the costs. 
The total subsidy has increased 245 
percent versus 1 10 percent for the city 
share. 

Sm HANOI. Pag* 8 



All hail the king! Neptune, that is 

Gianascoli 
will lead 25th 
annual fest 



By Aune Kirk 

CoffesDondent 

Virginia Beach has a new king. 

He is still Joe Gianascoli to his 
friends and family, but King Neptune 
XXV to the rest of the world. His 
official job is to reign over the 25th 
annual Virginia Beach Neptune 
Festival in September. The event 
draws about I million people to 
Virginia Beach and generates about 
$15 in economic impact for the city. 

"The festival originally began as a 
event to bring closure to the summer 
and chance to enjoy the last rays of 
sun for the locals," Gianascoli 
explained. 

"But it's grown far beyond regional 
to one of the biggest festivals on the 
East Coast. People come from 
Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, New 
Yoric and even Canada." 

Gianascoli said there are as many as 
65 events associated with the festival 
and activities for all ages. 

The festivities will begin with the 
1998 Neptune Festival Golf 
Tournament scheduled for May 20. 
Other events to follow inclu(tea black- 
tic affair, sports competitions, 
children's activities, a parade featuring 
the Philadelphia Mummers, an art 
show, a major air show hosted by 
Oceana Naval Air Station, concerts 
and exhibits. 




KING'S CORONATION. Joe Giamtcoii was named the 25tk iUag NSStaM m 
Sunday daring a coronation at the Cavalier on the HM. Neptene Festival vol- 
unteer Pat UU helps Gianascoli into his robe. 



Last year, new events were added 
including a wine festival, surf-fishing 
tournament and a soccer classic for 
adults. 

One of most popular events is the 
North American Sand Sculpting 
Championship with divisions for 
children, corporations and solo master 



sculptors. 

"We have 19 sand sculpuns already 
signed up this year," Gianascoli sid. 
"Thai's pretty go(xl, as only 24 arc 
allowed in big competitions." 

The identities of King Nepbme 



Health department marks consolidation 




Myf mim Ot araJBiTilwlin m epaa 



fkOtokrVMokHMI 

er NHte Mrith imme Or. MaM 



heaw althe tfepanmnt's new head- 



Most programs 
brought together 
under one roof 

By Victoria Hociit 

Editor 

When retired public health nur^ 
Mary Pleva came to the Virginia 
Beach [k^artment of Public Health in 
1980, the best she could de^ribe it 
was "scattered." 

Services and lyog r a ns were offsw! 
in a hodgepodge of buildings l^re and 
there, often long rides from one 
tKHter. 

"It seemed very much like a rural 
health department because there was 
no basic administration building. 
Norfolk, in many ways, was mwe 
I»t)gressive at the time," she recalled. 
"It hi^ iKN been centrili»d ." 

When she retired in 1990, ierw% 
locations were still largely »:ttle^i 
thrwighout the r^tm city. 

But no mm. 



On Friday, PIcva was among 
department employees and retirees on 
hand to celebrate the opening of a 
centralized department. Newly 
relocated in the Pembroke Corporate 
Center III, Public Health occupies the 
first two floors of a thr^-story Iniilding 
at 4452 Cwp&moB L»m. 

The move represents the 
consolidation of three sites and is 
located on mapr bus tooies. WIC will 
continue to maintain ttoee Kktttkmal 
offlas in Virginia B^h. 

CcmsolidttkHi ol 1 13 aaff to the one 
location mans a rcdiKtion of netvroifc 
costs, pooling of vehicles, e^^uipment 
and cellular telefriioiKs, redtK;tion ot 
travel between sites, and a better 
design for clinic facilities and slur^ 

City Manager Jim Sjxwe sakl it's a 
win-win ^tuttion. 

"This is going to save nMcy in 
i^ns (tf dtt eoNKA^^Mtrfa tot of 
qwc» an»d mm. It te^ all !rf tte 

SaeHiALTN,V^t 



^^^^^^mmm^f^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmgmm 



mmmmmmmmmifmmmmm 



2 Virginia Beach Sun, Friday, April 10, 1998 



Commentary 



CRIME LINE TELETHON 

'Paying' it safe 

A woman is murdered on a city street in late 
evening. Police know several witnesses were 
in the vicinity during the incident but haven't 
reported their sighting of the crime. 

A man is found dead slumped over the 
wheel of his car — the victim of foul play. 
Police have no leads. 

A gunman is targeting area convenience 
stores for armed robbery. Police have 
videotapes of the suspect in action yet no clue 
as to his identity. 

In all of these cases someone may have 
much needed information from which the 
police could benefit. The problem is that 
potential witnesses fear revealing their 
identities. 

Thanks to Crime 
Line, witnesses can do 
the law a favor and 
benefit from a cash 
reward, should tips 
lead to arrest, while 
maintaining anonym- 
ity. Rewards are paid 
from private donations 
to the program, never 
state or city funds. 

Success is proven. Over the years. Crime 
Line in Hampton Roads has resulted in the 
recovery of more than $23 million in stolen 
property and illegal drugs with a conviction 
rate of 97 percent of those arrested through 
Crime Line tips. 

Now is the public's chance to help the 
program in a different way. 

For the 14th time, civilian organizers and 
volunteers will gather with their police 
counterparts for the Greater Hampton Roads 
Crime Line Telethon. This year's broadcast 
will air Saturday from 8 to 11 p.m. on WVEC- 
TV 13. The program will be hosted be 
anchors Regina Mobley and Mike Lewis and 
will feature other Channel 13 personalities, 
along with local dignitaries. 

The annual broadcast is the centerpiece of 
financial support for Crime Line and Crime 
Solver programs throughout Hampton Roads. 
According to C. Jerry Franklin, telethon 
chairman, "Crime Line is paying tips to catch 
criminals 364 days out of the year. This one 
night makes all that possible." 

Last year's drive netted $97,000. which 
organizers hope to top Saturday. Dig deep 
and pay up to help Hampton Roads play it 
safe. — V.E.H. 




msycmcMi 




Fax your letter 
to the editor, 548-0390. 



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"Bye-bye, Son. It's tax time . . . you're my firstborn . . .you know the rules." 



Who cares about Virginia's cities? 



By Scott Bates 

Who cares about Virginia cities? 
If you care about the threat of gang 
violence, you should care about 
Virginia's cities. If you care about 
the increase of suburban sprawl and 
traffic, you should care about 
Virginia's cities. If you care about 
the disappearance of prime faim 
land, you should care about 
Virginia's cities. 

Speaker of the House of 
Delegates Tom Moss (D-Norfolk) 
has pushed for the creation of a 
commission to study the plight of 
Virginia's cities, and in the last 
session of the General Assembly, 
he won. A commission madeup of 
24 members, IS drawn from the 
General Assembly, has been 
charged with making 
recommendations for legislation in 
the year 2000. 

The project begins life with the 
not so catchy name "Commission 
on the Condition and Future of 
Virginia's Cities." It will examine, 
among other things, the state's 
annexation laws and funding 
formulas for state programs. 

In 1993, I had the honor of 
serving as chairman of the 
Commission on the Revitalization 
of Virginia's Urban Areas. Created 
with just one year left in the 
governor's term of office, we 
traveled to Roanoke, Norfolk, 
Richmond and Arlington to hdd 
open hearings and meet with the 
people on the front lines of the 
battle to save our cities. 

I rode with the Norfolk police 
one night and got an idea of the 
danger on many of the streets of 
our cities and the magnitude of the 
drug problem. I toured public 
housing that was not fit for human 
habitation. I saw living downtowns 



I rode with the 
Norfolk police one 
night and got an 
idea of the danger 
on many of the 
streets of our cities 
and the magnitude 
of the drug 
problem. 



that provided a positive example of 
how we can get our cities back on 
their feet. There was hope for 
renewal. 

What struck me most about the 
decline of our cities was the toll it 
took on the rest of Virginia. If 
Portsmouth and Norfolk lose 
businesses and have drug and crime 
problems, expect to see it in 
Virginia Beach five years later. 
Crime and drugs know no 
boundaries. If Roanoke's inner coie 
is dying, businesses and homes ave 
built in the outlying suburbs. The 
sprawl begins turning the valley 
into something beginning to 
resemble northon Virginia. 

Soon the suburban shopping 
malls and developments gobble up 
prime farmland and begin to price 
families off the land. The ch^acto' 
of Virginia begins to change, and 
not always for the better. 

Why should we care about saving 
our cities? Because we are all in 
this together. Decaying cities mean 
the rot will eventually seep into 
the suburbs and the sprawl will 
damage the character and lifestyle 



of rural Virginia. 

Our cities are worth too much to 
let fall by the wayside. They are 
home to tens of thousands of 
Virginians who are ready to 
contribute to this commonwealth. 
They just need an education, job 
training and a chance. 

We need a highly educated, 
healthy and motivated workforce to 
attract the jobs of the 21st century 
that will keep our commonwealth 
prosperous. The children of our 
cities are too important to our 
success to be left behind. 

The highways, roads, bridges, 
ports and airports of our cities ae 
too valuable to be left to crumble. 
The infrastructure exists fa* 
sustaining prosperity for a 
generation. Our grandparents and 
parents paid their tax dollars to 
invest in Virginia and we cannot 
let their efforts go to waste. The 
state needs to keep up existing 
infrastnicture. 

We must invest in the health care 
of the children of Virginia's urtian 
areas. They are under served and at 
risk. We must invest in the 
education of the young people of 
Virginia's urban areas. The fundirtg 
is separate and unequal. There is 
much that needs to be done. 

When I was chairman of tlie 
Urban Commission in 1993. we 
had no real estate money to invest 
in revitalizing our urban areas. 
Five years later that is no longer 
the case. 

Speaker Moss knows that the 
resources are there to make a real 
difference in the fight to save our 
cities and build a strong 
commonwealth. Now we will have 
to see if there is the political will 
present in the General Assembly to 
do the job. 



Spring is nothing to sneeze at 




Off The 
Cuff 

By Victoria 
Hecht, editor 



Ah spring! 

The flowers areblooming, the trees 

are budding — mi the pdlen count 

is already skyrocketing. 
Welcome to April in Hampton 
Roads. 

As I write 
there is a 
handy sup- 
ply of tissues 
just within 
reach to 
catch the 
steady drip, 
drip, drip 
from my 
nose. The 
throat is 
hoarse, a mi- 
graine has 
l)een putting 
untold pres- 
sure on my 
already 
clogged 
haKl,and«>- 

workers have grown «^iry of my 

ccxistant sieezing. 
But, h^k, it's qving! Ain't it 

grand? 

I was talking to a PortaiKXith fel- 
low last week who has lived here ju^ 
about his whole life, sa^ for a few 
early years in New Yak. Pdlm $»■ 
son — (M- mignrioe 9esm, as it's dso 
called — is the kxcrftbe fortunate 1 J 
mi llion who make dnff b(»ne here in 
Hampton Roiuls. 

"Pollen?" te aiiffwl Oiterally). 
"You're bcrni atopc vo it" 

In my cast aui tlKM]^«Is of Mh- 
er$, it's m true. 

We are doomed to a Me^ee {rf 
yellow-oMed aa, padi^ mi pa- 
tim. Tte fine dM &m^ dsoi^ 
screen (^opm mntows nd nfil- 



clothing hung outside to dry. A good 
rain does little to get rid of pollen and, 
in fact, encourages more. Walk 
through grass and you will emerge 
with yellow shoes. 

For those who suffer like myself, 
my mom and my friend in Ports- 
mouth, our solace is over-Uie-counter 
remedies and simply staying inside. 
An unfortunate few, like my good pal 
Dave, are subjected to a regimen of 
injections. Double ouch! 

Spring is a time to revel, but also a 
time to suffer. God gave us the beau- 
tiful foUage ami flowers to enjoy at 
their peak. And what 60 we do? We 
aieeze at ikmA-iiape the Man Up- 
stairs doesn't take offoise at that 

Speaking of spring, there's some 
taott imag»y that comes with it — 
bonny rabbits and Easter eggs. 

While Halloween is my favfmtt 
holiday (I love costumes and 
"ghmifery'i, Easter runs a close sec- 
ond. So many n^mor^ are wrqqjed 
iq) in this holkiay celebrating our 
Chris's reisineoioa. 

MostrenKimlxaKxs ceobaatam^ 
church — Holy Week services, P^m 
Sunday, the retelling of Jesus' last 
days, evoi Easter egg hunts. 

Oiie(tf my swe^^meanories iai't 
from my dnUhood at all. It occurred 
jist two yem% ^0 wti^ I wm a 
Smdi^r sclrad t»K:her for kfaida-- 
^rtners. 

Por we^ we had been retes^ng 
a Ibtfe song to sing to the oxipega- 
lMidurii^dieiiK]rnmgsain(%.Little 
Brie, OIK (rf my rkmC ei^r pi^Hk, 
jattONiUn'tconnect waving tenses 
ofpitai with J«insrivid ntoJant^ 
Icm. 

BA he li^ iIk i^ thtt ChiA 
lode ^bvk a (knk^ dtvtaig htt ^ 
ri(MS entry . To m^ dunp ^ner (» 
tey &ic — o^ ance lie CMdfh't 



remembCT the temi "F^lm Sunday" 
— I'd always referenced the donkey 
in our discussions of Holy Week. 

The Palm Sunday church p«for- 
mance came and went The next S un- 
day was, of course, Easter. As we 
discussed the significance of the holi- 
day, I tried to refresh the youngsters 
with what we'd learnt the week 
before. 

"So, Eric," I smiled, turning to my 
prize student, "today is Easter. That 
means last Sunday we celebrated 
what?" 

He thou^t and thought I waved a 
small pieceof palm to jog his memory . 
Firmlly, die Ught of recognition shone 
in his eyes. 

"Oh, that's easy. Miss Vicky," he 
beamed. "It was Donkey Day!" 

All I could do was smile. My little 
wOTdassociaticM) trick hadn't woiced 
quite the way I antKipaied it would 
on a 5-year-old. 

Finally, Easto- means one mare 
thing to me — a Wg meal. For the 
third year in a row I'm un^^kii^ 
the holiday dinner at my house for 
Evan's family and mine. 

If prevwus experiences are any 
indicatcH-, I can expect at least one 
disasto'. Last year the dc% ate the 
gngeous loncm cake that I h^ la- 
b(Med (Mt for % kmg. 

Tte ^ar bef(8« diat she mma^ 
to consume a wlwfe bowl o£ dyed 
Paster ^gs — something you really 
(km't wmt yoiff d(% to do if ^m live 
in cime qustss. 

I'm hoping tlungs will go OK, but 
Justin case I'm ihinkmg (rf tombing 
the dog tt) d% tack )^d while all 
m«il pre|»rttkMs ne und^ vray. 
I en jus imi^ne l»r ^ttmg IksM ^ 
thehttnt 

Happy Eaas to all. Good dining 
$mi ^ hunting. 




The Real 
World 

By B.J. Ses- 
sions, senior col- 
umnist. 



What's good for 
the president is 
good for all 

What does U.S. District Judge Su- 
san Webber Wright's decision to dis- 
miss Paula Jones sexual miscraiduct 
claims against Bill Clinton tell you? 
It tells me 
that the com- 
mon Ameri- 
can citizen is 
held to a 
high^mwal 
standard 
than their 
presidait. 

It also tells 
me diat every 
man in the 
work place 
or any drill 
instructor in 
the military 
is now by law 
entitled to 
^— — ^^"^^ one free 
grope or re- 
quest for oral 
sex. 1 can just hear the defense law- 
yers now telling the judge: "But your 
honor, I cite the Paula Jones case 
where the president of the United 
States got a free pass. So why not my 
client?" 

Good question. Every military man 
or woman who has been punished for 
anything to do with sex, except rape, 
should be placed back on duty with 
back pay. Their commander-in-chief 
has set the standardfor anything goes. 
If you like it, grab it TTie courts will 
dismiss it. Clinton has lied so much 
that it's hard to keep up with him. He 
lied about his draft deferments. He 
lied about his marijuana usage, say- 
ing he "did not inhale." He lied about 
Gennifer Flowers, then had to admit 
the truth under oath. 

He lied about his affair with former 
Miss AmericaElizabeth Ward Grjce. 
She says they had a one-night stand. 
He says Kathleen Willey is lying 
when she says that he kissed her, put 
his hands on her breasts and put her 
hand on his genitals. She swore that it 
happened under oath. He denied it 
under oath. 

Monica Lewinsky is on tape de- 
scribing her affair with Clinton. He 
denies it. Paula Jones swore that he 
dropped his pants in a hotel room. He 
denied it under oath and so it goes on 
and on. He cries that the press is 
against him, but the liberal press re- 
ally doesn't pin him down. 

In herbook "Passion and Betrayal," 
Gennifer Flowers says, "As we grew 
closer to each other (referring to 
Chnton) we naturally developed pet 
names for one another. I was his 
'Pookie' and he was 'Baby' or 'Dar- 
ling' to me. I often wonder if Bill has 
continued his womanizing ways now 
that he is in the White House." 

The answer to that question can be 
answered with a resounding "yes." 
Why doesn ' t Sam Donaldson ask him 
about that? 

When Wright said, "Although 
(Clinton's) alleged conduct, if true, 
may certainly be characterized as 
boorish and offensive, ev»i a most 
charitable reading of the record in 
this case fails 10 reveal a basis for a 
claim of criminal sexual assault." 

So now all you freaks and sex nuts 
are protected by that ruling. Have at 
it. 

Welcome to the real world. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

P.O. Box 13Z7 
1024 North Battlefleld Blvd. 

ChesBpeake, Va. 2^20 

TdephoDe: (757) 547-4571 

(USPSMO-140) 

FobMicr 

Hanes Byerly 

General Manager 

RcmWiliiwt 

Editioral Supcrvbor 
Jamie Brown 

Editor 

Victoria Hecht 

BudncM Maa^er 
Leigh Wud 

Conpoiilkn 

LorettaLomn 

The Virginia Beach Sun is pub- 
liihed every Friday by ByerfyPobBca- 
lions. Inc.. 1000 Armory Drive, 
I^Biklin..Viigmia 238S1. taiodicals 
postage paid m Franklin. Vff^nia tni 
additional entry offka. Poatmaaien 
SokI Mldrett change* to 1000 Annixy 
Drive, Prnddin, Virginia 23831. Svb- 
icription Rates: By mail adtbmet 
within C miles of Virgiiua Beach, 
Va.. one ye*. $15.95. two yean. 
$^.%. Virginia md Nnft Can^m^ 
am y^t, $17.83, two ye^, S29J0. 
AU other statu mm yeK, $24.0(^ two 
yean, S38 JO. ^aUe m advance. 

CMia Byerty PobUcatiims nem- 
p^pa%: The Om^eAe fern. The 
PatsoMiith Tlmti, The TMewattr 
Nm,TheBn)niwklcTanaa.<2aeellB, 

Miwiddto Mo^or, The ^^mborg 
M^or. 



m^mamammm 



Virginia Beach Sun, Friday, Apil 10, 1998 3 



Golden opportunities abound 
for city senior citizens 




The 

Mayor's 

Report 

Mayor Meyera 
Obemdorf 



Attention all seni(H- citizens! 
If you are one who enjoys the thrill 
of competition.socializingwith other 
fun people, eating good food and just 
having a 
good time, 
then you 
need to reg- 
ister for the 
Virginia 
Beach Senior 
Olympics 
that will be 
held at the 
Great Neck 
Community 
Recreation 
Center this 
month, April 
21-22. 

This two- 
day event 
will feature 
vendors in 
the lobby on 
Tuesday dis- 
tributing infor- 
mation beneficial to all senior citi- 
zens, with more than 30 events rang- 
ing from tennis, swimming, basket- 
ball, trackand field, ladminton,bowl- 
ing, Softball and many more. 

For a $5 fee you are able to partici- 
pate in as many activities as you 
wish, receive a T-shirt, lunch both 
days, medals awarded to first, second 
and third places and just have some 
good old fashioned fun. 

This event promises some exciting 
entertainment with the U.S. Conti- 
nental Band performing on Tuesday 
and the sounds of deejay Ben Grey 
spinning some big band music for 
your listening and dancing pleasure. 

Although a golden field day has 
been held forapproximately 1 3 years, 
this is the third Senica* Olympics. 
Two-hundred soiiors participated in 
1996, and 220 participated in 1997. 

You need not be a "world class 
athlete" to compete. All skill levels 
and abilities are welcomed. Each 
event includes age categories for men 
and women. This event is considered 
a practice session for many who go 
on to compete in the state competi- 
tion in Williamsburg at the College 
of William and Mary. The dates for 
those games are May 27-31. 

The Athletic Unit at the Great Neck 
Community Recreation will hold 
Senior Olympic trainingclinics where 
you can practice the events that you 
would-like to otter. TTiey welcome 
first time and experienced competi- 
tors. Theseclinics will begin on March 
24 and will run on Mondays and 
Wednesdays from 9:30-11 a.m. 
through April 15. There is no addi- 
tional fee f(x these clinics. 



So, for all of you seniors, age 50 
and up, make your .reservations by 
April 13 to guarantee a T-shirt and 
lunch and mark your calendar for 
April 21-22 and head over to the 
Great Neck Community Recreation 
CentCT and register so you can get 
busy with those training sessions and 
"Experience the Fun." 

The Senior Olympics is only one 
of the activities offoed fw seniors. 
Each recreation center has their own 
schedule of events and you can call 
for those schedules: 

■ Bayside, 4500 First Court Rd., 
460-7540; 

■ Bow Creek, 3427 Qubhouse 
Rd., 431-3765; 

■ Great Neck, 2521 Shorehaven 
Dr.. 496-6766; 

■ Kempsville, 800 Monmouth Ln., 
474-8492; 

■ Seatack, 141 S. Birdneck, 437- 
4858; and, 

■ Princess Anne, 1400 Ferrell 
Pkwy., 426-0022. 

A Ust of what is offered at the Great 
NeckRecreation Center for the month 
of April includes: 

■ April 9 - Easter bonnet contest 
and prize hunt. 

■ Ap-il 14 - Birthday party, blood 
pressure check. 

■ April 16 - Fire safety program, 
10:30 a.m. 

■ April 2 1 - Virginia Beach Senior 
Olympics. 

■April 22- Virginia Beach Senior 
Olympics. 

■ April 23 - Let's visit Ben and 
Jerry's after lunch. 

■ April 28 - Newspaper Scavenger 
Hunt. 

■ April 29 - Spring picnic at 
Farmer's Market Cost is $3.50. 

■ April 30 - Trip to Botanical 
Gardens. 

This is just a sample of what is 
offered for just one month at one 
recreation center for all senior citi- 
zois. Just think. Every month, at ev- 
ery recreation center all these activi- 
ties and more are planned just for 
you. 

A date to look forward to is May 20 
what a taloit show will be held put 
on by the joint efforts of all tte Vir- 
ginia Beach reaeation centCTS. En- 
tries can perform as a group or as a 
single participant. Can you sing, 
dance, etc? Come and represent your 
favorite recreation center for this very 
special event 

Call a recreation center closest to 
you today and find out what could be 
in stwe for you. Come and "Experi- 
ence the Fun." 

Susan Topping from the Great Neck 
Recreation Certter contributed to this 
column. 



Suspect sought In residential 
burglary; reward offered 



Burglary affects evwyone frran the 
p^^n whose residence is burglar- 
ized to those who pay higher insur- 
ance premiums. 
On Tuesday, March 24 at around 
8:40 a.m., an 
ai»rtment in 
the 700 block 
of Regency 
Drive was 
broken into 
from a bed- 
room win- 
dow. The 
resident 
heard noises 
from another 
room and 
went to see 
what hap- 
pened. The 
resident con- 
front a man in 
the bedroom 
who was 
————— holding a 
duffle bag. 
The subject 
left with the video equipment he h^ 
stolen. 




Crime 
Solvers 

By Det. Lou 
Chappell, Vir- 
ginia Beach Po- 
lice Department 




StJ^Ct 



The subject was described as a 
black male, 5-feet-8-inches tall with 
a stocky build and a thin mustache. 
He was wearing a dark jacket, green 
pants fflid a "Navy Shipyard" base- 
ball cap. 

Give IB a call at 427-0000 if you 
have information on tfiis crime. You 
will remain anonymous and could 
receive a cash reward up to $1,000. 



Worship Directions conference set 



The Center fw SataiwlMusjc will 
present "Worship Directions: A 
Conference for Christians with 
Questions" on April 24-25 at 
Virginia Unitwl Methodist Church, 
RttifK Avenue at 19th StrMst The 
event is des^twd f<s church laity, 
IHofi^onal saff and ck 

The conference will tmmt 
nationally-known authors ad 
lecturers Marva Dawn, Craig 
Koinet Miller, Dan Benedict and 
Roger Dowdy. Workshqw will be 
held on Friday with tt^ws 
BKhidii^ "Uids^mbf (he 
Calture in Which the Qiwch 
Wadai»," '^Juonv <M^m for 



Experiencing Worship," "Bknded 
Wwship: Faithful in Substance aid 
Alive in PffltKipation," "Ministry 
in the I^stmodern Age," and 
"Worship Music: For I^tors 
From a Musicim's I^rspecti^and 
for Musicians from a Musicians 
frwn a Th«»logian's Paspective." 

School chaplain Bob Ch^xnan 
will lead opening and closing 
meditation each day and Dr. Craig 
Wansink, religious studies 
d^JMmoit cocvdinator, will 
moderate the Saturday panel 
diKu^te. 

For furAer details contact die 
t«BW. 455-3376. 



Up close and personal 

%m Leahy: Qoodtoiht last drop 



By Victoria Hecht 

Editor 

"Water, water everywhere, but nary a 
drop to drink." 

When Tom Leahy was hired by the city of 
Virginia Beach in 1980 to study alternative 
water supplies, the long-time resident knew 
he could take a cooling dip in the ocean 
any time — but washing his car was anotho- 
stay. 

In a city whose very livelihood is based in 
large part on the salty Atlantic's ability to 
draw tourists, the inability to provide a safe, 
endless fresh water supply was ironic. 

Today, of course, millions of gallons daily 
flow through the Lake Gaston pipeline. Had 
it not been for the Water Supply Project 
team with Leahy as its manager, Virginia 
Beach might still be thirsting for relief. 

All that is in the past. Now all Leahy 
needs to do is pull up a computer screen to 
view the pump station in Gasburg, where 
Virginia's Beach newest water supply 
begins its 76-milc journey. 

"But the reason the city has been so 
successful is that we take a personal, 
intensive role in the project On the average 
of every seven to 10 days I go out there, 
visit the pump station, make sure the 
grounds artd facilities are being maintained, 
and drive on top of the pipeline route," 
Leahy explained. 

"It would be easy sometime to forget 
about doing all that and just turn on the 
computer. But if you want the project to last 
50 or 100 years or more, you have to make 
sure it's being maintained properly." 

For the first time in about 20 years, 
Virginia Beach will not have to worry about 
drought 

"For about half the years since 1976 to 
1997, we were under some sort of water-use 
restrictions," Leahy reflected. "People did 
adapt, but the fact of the matter is that 
washing your car on a Sunday afternoon is 
like an American pastime. People in 
Virginia Beach have always been water- 
wise and ought to be able to do that (wash 
cars) without having government look over 
their shoulders." 

Leahy, who was recently recognized as 
Engineer of the Year by the Tidewater 
Chapter of the Virginia Society of 
Professional Engineers, says that Hampton 
Roads' popularity as a commercial, 
residential and military hub can be credited 
to its watery surrounding. Those same 
surroundings mean a less-than-adequate 
drinking water supply for the burgeoning 
population. 

"We have the intersection of the James 
River. Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic 
Ocean, which forms a huge, deep warm 
water port that is important to the Navy. The 
Navy has two major installations — San 
Diego, Calif, and Norfolk. Everything else is 
a very secondary installation. 

"The reason people come here is 
commercial fishing, the port, the ocean. 
Those are the same reasons why we don't 
have a lot of fresh water — we're a flat 
estuary. The reasons that create the 
population are the same reasons we don't 
have large supplies of fresh water. That's 
just the way it is," he explained. 

A tough sell to Lake Gaston area residents 
from the start, the Water Supply Project and 
the state of North Carolina fought the 
project in court for years. Since the 
pipeline's dedication last year, however, 
Leahy feels Virginia Beach has made some 
inroads. 

"These were basically people who were 
used to getting their way, usually the 
captains of industry or that kind of thing. A 
real tough sell. We're slowly making friends 
out there, and the city is supporting their 
fire and rescue squads." 

The battle, however, is not over. Virginia 
Power, which owns Gaston, is up for a 50- 
year federal licensing renewal in 2001. 

"During that process everything is looked 
at. However, we don't believe that the 
federal agency, after granting us the right to 
build this project and investing a quarter of 
a billion dollars, would change its mind," 
he said. "We can't predict the future, but 
we are confident that North Carolina will 
not be able to misuse the project that way." 
Leahy, who worked in de-salting and 
ultra-pure water applications before joining 
the city, believes the biggest story with the 
issue has not been the pipeline. Instead, he 
says it was City Council's courage to stick 
with its guns on Gaston. 

"In the end you take people like me — 
engineers, {n-ofessitmal ^cretaries, lawyers, 
city administrators — and we were all doing 
our jobs. Buy City Council members were 
the ones who had to suffa through elections 
year after year and run for office on the 
heels of a summer with no water. The big 
story has been a City Council that 15 years 
ago said 'OK, enough is enough. We have 
to make a nand and so for it' Ttey nev» 
locAed back. TTicy iKver weatoiwi.'' 

Name: Thomas Matxx^ Leahy III. 

WlMt bronght you to thU area: 

My tamMy mo<^ hen in 1966 wTw) my Mm 
was transferred to ttw Navy Ratto ImmiUm 
Station m the tkm CanMn^^hee^MM few. 




"For about half the 
years since 1976 to 
1997, we were under 
some sort of water-use 
restrictions. People did 
adapt, but the fact of 
the matter Is that 
washing your car on a 
Sunday afternoon is 
like an American 
pastime^ 

Tom Leahy, MMter resources maiager 

Hometown: Virginia Beach. 

Age: 45. 

Nickname: Tom. 

Occupation: Water resources manager, 
Virginia Beach Department of Puttie Utilities. 

Marital Status: Married for 15 years to 
Pam, my college sweetheart and a real find. 

Children: Two great children — Jennifer 
Beth, 14, who gets good grades, plays piano, 
swims real iwllsand likes long showers; Thomas 
Michael, 10, who also gets good grades, plays 
guitar, swims real well and likes to argue witti me. 

Favorite movies: My favorite movie of all 
time was "Star Wars." I also like many of this 
year's crop ("Titanic," "LA Confidential," 'As 
Good as it Gets"). 

Magazines I read regularly: 

Computer Shopper, American Waters Works 
Msociation Journal, T/me and News/wek. 

Favorite authors: Don't have one. 

Favorite night on the town: 

Dinner and a movie with my wife. Somettmes with 
ttie kids, ^meliims without. 

Favorite restaurant: That concept 
died when we got kids, but we do like Ruby 
Tuesc^ys m6 CMve Garden. 

Fa^rlte meal and beverage: Pizza 
and t^er. Why is t tfiat all the tm foods are bad 
for you tfid viM versa? 

What most people don't know 
about myself: Most people think I wodid 
find retroment borir^. 



Best thing about myself: I don't give 
up easily and I don't get intimidated easily. 

Wont traJt: I m very good at nwnbws 

but have frouble remembering names, no matter 
how hard I try. I would gladly trade some of my 
numbers ability to have a better ability to recall 
names. 

Pets: None. The Wds want a dog, but I know 
how that would go — the same way it went with 
the fish and the hamsters. It seemed like I was 
always cleaning cages and tanks. 

Hobbles: I u^d to like cars and boats, but 
that has been replaced with a house and family. I 
am not complaining. 

Ideal vacation: Two weeks at the Out er 
Banks in August. A nice place at Corolla Light 
with view of the sound wotJd be ^eat. 

Pet peeves: People who do not consider 
the impact of their conduct upon those around 
them. 

First job: Bus boy at Neptune's Corner 
Restaurant at 3 1st and Atlantic in the summer of 
1969. 1 was 16, had a car and a surfboard. What 
a summer. 

Least liked job: Cleaning out storm 
drains and culverte in what is now Green Run in 
the summer of 1970. 

Favorite sports teams: Washington 
Redskins, Virginia Cavaliers and anyone ptaying 
the Dallas Cowboys, Virginia Tech Hokies or 
North Carolina Tartieeis. 

Favorite musicians: In years ^st John 
Lennon and Harry Chapin. Today no one in 
particular. 

Host embarrassing moment: I 

backed my veNde into a ditch in ttie Late Gashsi 
piF^line route with a councilman and reporter on 
board. 

How I would like to be 
remembered: As a good husband, a good 
father and an honest man. 

If I received $1 million: Two vrards 
— mutual furxls. Two more — early retirement. 
Jm more - Wg sailboat. 

If I had 10 minutes on national 
television: If ewryone would look around 
a/rt see w^t is haf^ning to us and inhat we 
are <toing to oursef«s and our cWWren and 
consicfer wfiat m now orilectfvsly seem to 
condwe, and tfwn look tack ma insider 
wfwtt«r we mm havt Me^M any of it 10 
yan ago, m m^t all be *iwn to char^ 
oinrtves to make Vie vwrU, our naUon and our 
n«(^ibortiood a bMsr p^ce. 




8rr 



d ?wtrs^ Want fa hpnr nhni/f the POP'^"ill 




^■wawwH 



mmmmmmmmmmm 



■■■■^^■■■■■■■■i 



4 Vi^inia Beadi Sun. Hiday. April 10. 1998 



Upcoming 

EJVENTS 



A Good Friday worship service 
will be held at noon at Lynnhaven 
Colony Congregational Church, 
2217 West Great Neck Rd 



Divine Mercy Apostolate will 
host two dinner meetings with Film 
and novena in preparation icx 
Mercy Sunday in the Hampton 
Roads area on Tuesday, April 14 at 
Shbney's. 721 N. Battlefield Blvd. 
and Thursday, AjmiI 16 at Shoney's 
at Virginia Beach Blvd. and 
Newtown Rd. The schedule is 6:30 
p.m., dinner, 7:30 p.m. rosary and 
novena; 8-9, newly-released film 
"Ocean of Mocy-ThrccLivcs, One 
Vision, No Limits." For 
reservations call, 485-2221. 



The Princess Anne Business and 
Professional Woman's Club of 
Virginia Beach will meet on 
Monday, April 13 at the Holiday 
Inn-Surfside, 26th and Atlantic 
Avenue, at 6:30 p.m. 



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Pie face! 

Several of Virginia Beach's city 
leaders put their best face forward 
last week as part of "f^gs n' Pies," 
an annual fund-raiser sponsored 
by the city's commissioner of the 
revenue. The event featured a $6- 
per-plate barbecue dinner and pie 
toss. Targets were City Manager 
Jim Spore, Commissioner of the 
Revenue Phil Kellam, Real Estate 
Assessor Jerry Banigan and Major 
Bill Mann of the Sheriff's Office, 
About $2,500 was raised to help 
the commissioner's office Relay 
for Life team. Relay for Life Is a 
public education and fund-raising 
event for the American Cancer 
Society. 





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HISTORY SCHOLAIK. Honored as outetanding American history students, front from left, were: Leon 
Coleman, First Colonial High; D.J. Rodgers, Ocean Lakes High; Giza High, Tallwood High; May Yeng, 
GrMn Run High; and Dawn RIddick, Salem High. Back row: David Patch, Kellam High; Aaron Sanfbrd, 
Bayside High; Jeff Wu, Cox High; and Glenn Konowicz, Princess Anne High. Not pictured is Sarah Mar- 
guiles, Kempsville Hi^. 

DAR lauded for excellence 




By Lll Youell 

Club Correspondent 

For 21 years the Adam 
Thoroughgood, Francis Land, 
Lynnhaven Parish and Princess 
Anne County chapters of the 
Daughters of the American 
Revolution (DAR) have rea^zed 
excellence in American history by 
teachers and students. These 
chapters were surprised this year to 




be recopized by the Virginia 
Beach City Public Schools as 
Partners in Education. 

At this year's event, Mrs. John 
Schmidt, Regent, Francis Laxl 
Chapter, presided. Following the 
Pledge of Allegiance and the 
Americans' Creed, she iniroduced 
Dr. Sheila S. Magula, assistant 
superintendent of Virginia Beach 
City Public Schools, who 
welcomed the students, teachers, 
parents and ediK^ators. 

The- Outstanding American 
History Teachers were recognized. 
Norman Fuller of Tallwood High 
School was presented by Mrs. 
Howard Gibbs, historian, Francis 
Land Chapter. Hilda Principe of 
Kempsville High School w^ 
presented by Mrs. Nevelyn Stark, 
Regent, Lynnhaven Parish Chapt» 
and Joseph Craig Tucei of First 
Colonial High School w^ 
{resented by Mrs. Annette T. Hill, 
regent. Princess Anne County 
ChaptK. 

Each teacher was given a fiamed 
certificate and a Battle Off TIk 
Virginia Capes medallion, d^gnol 
to Commemorate the bicentennial 
of the decisive naval battle of the 
Revolutionary War. This dramatic 
event took pl^e off our Virginia 
Beach shores. 

One American history stiKfent 
from e^h of the 10 high schools 
was recogni^ as outstanding fw 
the 1997-98 schcwl ye«. Jeff Wu. 
F.W. Cox, was presented by 
JoseiHiine Anne Mathiai, re^nt, 
Adam ThoroughgcKid. She also 
presented Olenn Konowicz (^ 
pmotm AnM High Sdnol. « 



Schmidt recognized three student 
honorees — Aaron Sanford of 
Bayside High School, Dawn 
Riddick of Salem High School avl 
Giza High of Tallwood High 
School. Lil Youell of the 
Lynnhaven Parish Chapter 
recognized May Yeng of Green 
Run High School and explained 
that Sarah Margulies of 
Kempsville High School was 
unable to attend. 

Mrs. Harvey T. Walsh, Jr., 
historian, Princess Anne County 
Chapter, presented three 
outstanding students — Leai 
Coleman of First Colonial High 
School, Daniel James Rodgers of 
Ocean Lakes High School and 
David Patch, Floyd E. Kellam 
High School. 

Two fourth grade future 
historians were recognized fta- 
outstanding essays on the flag of 
the United States. There were 
Michael Nock, Woodstock 
Elementary, presented by Youell 
and Tyler Redd, Red Mill 
Elementary introduced by Mrs. 
Charles D. Nixon, wgrniizing 
secretary Virginia DAR, 

At the close of the co'snony, 
Layn^ H. Timlin, partnartip 
coordinato for the Virginia Bcadi 
City Public Schools, went to tte 
podium to present "Partners in 
Education" plaques to the four 
regenu in appreciaUtm of their 
long term partnership with the 
schools in encouraging ojot^oKe 
in ediKiittkm. 

A reception hosted by the 
Lynnhaven Parish Chapter 
followel. 



Health 
Tips O 



■ Virginia Beach General 
Hospital, in cooperation with the 
American Cancer Society, will 
hold a prostate cancer support 
group meeting, Man to Man, (Hi 
Thunday, April 16 at 6:30 p.m. in 
the Health Education Center, 
located across from the hospital's 
Emergency Center. Man to Man 
meets the third Thursday of each 
month. Men diagnosed with 
prostate cancer and their family 
members are invited to attend. Call 
481-8686 for more information. 

■ The Diabetes Treatment 
Center at Virginia Beach General 
Hospital will hold a support group 
meeting on .Tuesday, April 21 from 
3-4 p.m. in the Health Education 
Center, located across from the 
hospital's Emergency Center. This 
free service for p^iple with diabetes 
and their families offers boUi 
educational and emotional support. 
For more information call, 496- 
6239. 

■ Virginia Beach General 
Hospital will hold a Oncer 
Support Group meeting on 
Monday, April 20 at 6:30 p.m. in' 
the Health Education Center, 
located across from the hospital's 
Emergency Center. This free 
service for cancer patients and their 
families offers both educational and 
emotional support. The support 
group meets on the third Monday 
of every month. For more 
information call, 496-6330. 

■ Virginia Beach General 
Hospital will hold a Breast Cancra 
Support Group meeting on 
Monday, April 13 at 7 p.m. in the 
Health Education Center, kx:ated 
across firom the hospital's 
Emergency Center. This free 
service for breast cancer patients 
offers both educational aid 
emotional support. The su^iort 
group meets on the second Monday 
of every month. For more 
information call, 481-8393. 

■ Virginia Beach General 
Hospital will hold a Resolve 
Through Sharing Support Uroiq) 
meeting on Tuesday, Ajn-il 28 si. 
7:30 p.m. in the hospital's West 
Wing Conference Room. This 
support group helps {traits recover 
from the loss of a child through 
miscarriage, still birth or ealy 
infant death. Parents are wekx)me 
to share their feelings or just listen 
to others who understand and care. 
For more infcnmation call, 481- 
8292. 

■ Virginia Beach General 
Hospital will offer Ptapsted 
Brodi»^ and Sisters, a class to help 
ease a child's fears about the birdi 
of a new baby in the family, on 
Saturday, April 1 1 in the Virginia 
Beach General's Health Education 
Center. Space is limited and 
preregistration is required. For 
more information and to register 
c " the AtHome Care 
Maternal/Child Program, 467- 
4037. 

■ Virginia Beach General 
Hospital will offer an Infant/Child 
CPR class on Saturday, May 16 
from 8 a.m.-noon. The class will 
be held in the AtHrane Care Office, 
Oxford Square, 1450 Kempsville 
Rd. Training is designed for new 
parents, grandparents and all child 
care providers. A CPR-registered 
instructor will teach paiticipuits 
how to perf<»tn cardicpdmonary 
resuscitation and how to give Hrst 
aid to choking victims. This is a 
non-certifying class. To registo' 
and for more information call, 467- 
4037. 

■ Virginia Beach General 
Hospital will off a a Newborn C^ 
class on Tuesday, May 19 from 
6:30-9:30 p.m. in the hospital. 
The newborn class is desired to 
assist parents in taking care of their 
new arrivals. The class covos 
bathing, feeding, infant safety, stfe 
sleeping positions and doctor' 
visits. For more information and to 
register call the AtHome Care 
Maternal/Child Program, 467- 
4037. 

■ Virginia Beach Geaexai 
Hospital will offer Itenatal 
Information Night, a one-hour 
walking tour of Virginia Beach 
G^eral Hospital's Mothei^B^y 
Unit. This class provides an 
opportum^to receive inframation 
about delivering at Virginia Beach 
General. Classes will be held (xi 
Sunday, Aftil 19 at 7 p.m. in the 
V,irginia BeiK:h General H(^ital 
Lobby. Space is limited and 
preregistration is required. Fw 
more information and to re^s^ 
call the AtHome Care 
MaternalA::hild Program, 467- 
4037. 

■ Virginia Beach C^ooal 
Hos^tal (tff«s a w^ond prepared 
childbirth cl^s on Friday, April 24 
from 6-9 p.m. and Saturday, AfsH 
25 fnm 9 8.m.-5 p.m. The class 
location is the AtHome Care 
Office, 1450 Kempiville fU^ 



mm 



mm 



Discover history 
on a Dismal 
Swamp Tour 

The Great Dismal Swamp — Sii 
Thomas Moore saw its mystery 
and captured its legends in poetry, 
while George Washington saw its 
opportunities for timber and fertile 
ground. For only a short time 
during spring, this unique 
environment with its multitudes of 
unusual animals and plant life 
comes alive with butterflies and 
mipalory birds. 

The Virginia Marine Science 
Museum will offer the tare 
opportunity to see one of the east 
coast's most fascinating natural 
areas during the Great Dismal 
Swamp Family Excursion. 

Designed for families with 
children of all ages, the Great 
Dismal Swamp Family Excursion 
will take place on Saturday, April 
25. An interpretive walk and trip to 
Lake Drummond will highlight the 
day's activities. Participants will 
need to arrive at the museum's 
Owls Creek Marsh Pavilion 
parking lot by 8 a.m. and will 
return by 5 p.m. Participants 
should bring a bag lunch and wear 
comfortable walking shoes. 

Regisu-ation and pre-paymentare 
both required by April 17. Cost of 
the excursion is $15 members and 
$20 non-members and includes 
transportation. 

For more information or to 
register call, 437-6007. 



Virgiiiia Be^ Sun, Fricby, AfgU 10. 1998 5 



Legal 
Notices 



Take a moonlight 
stroll and help 
King's Daughters 

Enjoy a fun-filled evening of 
family entertainment, wholesome 
activities, great food and good 
fellowship — followed by a 
wonderful spring stroll in the 
moonlight along the Virginia 
Beach Boardwalk. It's all to benefit 
the patients cared for by Children's 
Hospital of the King's Daughters. 

The 1998 Moonlight Walk fw 
the Children takes place May 8 at 
the 24th Street OceanfrontPark on 
the Boardwalk. Festivities begin at 
6 p.m. and the 2.S-mile walk starts 
as the m6on rises, ijipipximately 
7:36 p.tn. 1"he contribution to 
CHKD is only $10 per walker. <s 
only $25 for a family of iq) to five. 

Included in the evening's 
activities are clowns, magicians, 
children's games, a Beanie Babies 
raffle and musical entertainment by 
Boulevffi^d 58, The Blend and Frame 
of Mind. 

Individuals as well as coqxxatc, 
churehand military teams and their 
families are invited to participate. 

This annual spring project of the 
Nofolk City Union of The King's 
Daughters (NCUKD), the founding 
organization of CHKD, proviiks m 
excellent opportunity for families, 
friends, neighbors and co-woriras 
to join together in a fun event for a 
wOTthwhile cause — to provide the 
very best medical care for the 
region's children. 

For more information call the 
NCUKD, 668-7098. 



Perks Dance Music 
Theater guaranteed 
to get you moving 

A collaboration of dan^and live 
music, The Perks Dance Music 
Theater sparks a gutsy connection 
between the visual and the aural. 
This exciting finale to Tidewater 
Performing Arts Society's 1997-98 
season is scheduled for Saturday, 
May 9 at the 'Virginia Beach 
I^vilion Ttieata at 8 p.m. 

Rebecca Stenn. dancer and 
(AoitopafMa of The Poks, studied 
at Julliard and has darned with »ich 
companies as Pilobolus and 
Momix. She displays siqjob 
technkal strength and has a minted 
tteatrical (H^oice. 

Stenn and her troupe perform 15 
short dances pieces — some very 
eneiieuc — othere soothing, while 
the onstage en^ntble acxcxnpanks 
most dances with original muacal 
compositions. 

The company is comixised d 
five dancers and eight musicians, 
wiA Stenn's partno' Neo 
AtK>ndolo the music omipcsa'. 
The music is entirely wiginal and 
designed specifically for die 
choeogfuAy. 



Trustee's Sale 
1244 Skylark Drive. 
Virginia Beach. VA 
DEFAULT having been made in 
the terms of a certain Deed of Trust 
dated April 30. 1996. andrecaded 
in the Cleric's Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach. VA, in Deed Book 3612, at 
page 726, and the undersigned, 
having been duly appointed as 
Substitute Trustees and having 
been requested so to do by the 
holder of the note secured, will 
procwdto sell at public auction Ra- 
cash on April 14. 1998, at 10:00 
a.m., at the front of the building 
housing the Virginia Beach Circuit 
Court, 2305 Judicial Boulevard, 
Virginia Beach, VA 23456, the 
property designated as Lot One (1), 
in Block I (eye), as shown on the 
plat of Resubdivision of Section 2. 
Cardinal Estates, which plat is 
recorded in the Cl^'s Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, VA, in Map Book 
64, at page 49. 

The property will be sold subject 
to all prior liens, ea^ments, 
restrictions, covenants, and 
conditions, if any. of record, a* 
cither matters which would be 
disclosed by an accurate survey or 
inspection of the premises. 

A deposit (in certified funds) of 
10% will be required of the 
successful bidder at time of sale and 
settlement to be made within 10 
days. TERMS: CASH, TTie 
successful bidder will be required to 
execute a Memorandum of 
Trustee's Sale outlining additional 
terms of sale and settlement, which 
will be availidtle for review prior to 
the announcement of sale. 

This is a communication from a 
(tebt collector. 

Glasser and Glasser, P.L.C., 

Substitute Trustee 

Dominion Tower, Suite 600 

999 Waterside Drive 

Norfolk, VA 23510 

Tel: (757) 625-6787 Ext. 200 

Between 10:00 a.m. & 12:00 
noon only. 

FUe No. 41486 

124' 
4t4-10 



Public Notie* 



Single tickets to the e^^iing 
p^cmmvx^e $9. S18, $22 and 
$24 and may be iw<ctaed though 
Ticketmaster outlets airi 
Tteketmwis' ch«^-by-^K«ie. 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

ON THE 17TH DAY OF 
MARCH. 1998 

IN RE: Application to Esttiblish 
the Resumptive Death of Chariene 
Penton Villingo- 

CH98-864 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

TO WHOM IT MAY 
CONCERN: 

This is a proceeding by which 
the Applicant seeks to estii>lish the 
presumptive death of Chariene 
Penton Villinger, pursuant to the 
provisions of Title 64.1, Chaptw 
5, of the Code of Vi^inia, 1950, 
as amended, Chariene Penton 
Villinger having not been seen or 
head from since approximately 
September 4, 1989, and your 
applicant, Donald Kern, Jr. seddng 
to have the fact of her dnuh 
established. 

A hearing has been set in 
Virginia Beach Circuit Court on 
May 21, 1998 at 11:00 a.m., to 
hear evidence concerning the 
alleged ab^nce of Charloie Penton 
Villinger and the circumstances and 
duration th»eof and for entry of mi 
wder pursuant to Section 64.1-109 
of the Code of Virginia. 

Jt is hereby ORDERED that any 
person or interested party ^ipear 
and take whatever steps necessary 
to protect their intaests. 

It is fuither ORDERED that this 
order be published once a week fw 
four successive weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun, a newspspa 
of general circulation in Virginia 
Brach, Virginia. 

C»tifed to be a TRUE COPY of 
re(»d in my custody 

J. Cifftis Fruit. Cleric 

Circuit Court, Virginia Beach 

By: Phyllis N. Stenas, Deputy 
Cleric 

Enter this 17th day of March, 
1998. 

Edward W. Hansen. Circuit 
Cant Judge 

I ask for this: 

Richard W. WhitienK»e, Coun»l 
forAiqrikant 

Rkhanl W. Whittanwe. Esq. 

Riclmd W. Whittsnwe, P.C. 
3104 Arct« Ave., P.O. Box %! 
Virpnia B«ch. Virginia 23451 
(757)425-5900 

13-1 
4*4-17 



CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 
IN RE: 

KATHERINE ELIZABETH 
POORE. a Minor 

IN THE MATTER OF THE 
ADOPTION OF THE CHILD 
KNOWN AS KATHERINE 
ELIZABETH POORE 

BIRTH CERTIFICATE 
REGISTRATION 

NO. 145-94-073788, 
REGISTERED IN THE 
COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA 
. ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
notify Steven Wayne Matthews, 
the putative father of the minor 
child, that a Petition to adopt die 
minor child by Leigh Poore Harris, 
the natural mother of the minor 
- child, and Jeffrey L. Harris, the 
spouse of the natural modier, has 
beenfited. 

And affidavit having been made 
and filed that the last known post 
office address of Steven Wayne 
Matthews was 824 Rivanna River 
Reach, Chesapeake, Virginia, 
23320. that mail has been returned 
and that the current whereabouts of 
Steven Wayne Matthews arc 
unknown. 

It is ORDERED that the said 
Steven Wayne Matthews, upon 
whom diligence has been used 
without effect to ascertain his 
location, appear at the above named 
Court on or before May 14, 1998 
at 11:00 A.M. and do what is 
necessary to protect his interests. 

It is further ordered that the 
foregoing portion of this order be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper published 
in the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

FREDERICK C. JENKS, in, 
CLERK 

KELLAM. PICKRELL. COX & 
TAYLOE 

A Professional Corpcvation 

JANICE PICKRELL 
ANDERSON 

300 Bank of the Commonwealth 
Building 
403 Boush Street 
Norfolk, VA 23510 
Telephone: (757) 627-8365 

14-1 
4t4-24 



Public Notice 



Virginia: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH 

Commonwealth of Vii^nia, 
Plaintiff v. 

$1,593.00 U.S. Currency 
(Hobbs), CL95-2609 

$615.00 U.S. Currency 
(Corprew).CL97-10 

$1,006.00 U.S. Currency 
(Anderson), CL97-507 

$1,750.00 U.S. Cunency 
(Godwin), CL95-686 

$850.00 U.S. Currency (Koch), 
CL97-2283 

$337.00 U.S. Currency (Kn^jp), 
CL97-2284 

CL97-3530 $25,900.00 USC 
(Brown/Iennings), Defendants 
Order of Publication And Affidavit 

THIS DAY CAME the Attorney 
for the Commonwealth and moved 
this Honorable Court to forfeit to 
the Commonwealth of Virginia the 
above refererxed items that were 
seized between August 9, 1995, 
and December 3, 1997. 

AN information was made, 
siped and filed with the Circuit 
Court Clerk's Office on each of the 
above matters. Said infomiation 
stated the owner(s) of the p-qwrty 
and the last known addr£^(es)of 
the owner(s) at the time the 
Information was filed. 

It ai^iearingthat the whereabouts 
of the owners is currently 
unknown, and that a registered 
letter has been mailed to their last 
known addresses, it is hereby 
ORDERED, that all parties appear 
on or before May 20, 1998, and do 
whatever is necessary to protect 
their interest in said property. 

It is further ORDERED that 
pursuant to Section 19.2-386.3(8) 
of the Code of Virginia (1950), as 
amended, this Ordo- of Publication 
be published once a week for four 
successive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of general 
circulation in the City of Virginia 



Beach. 

ENTER THIS 24th day of 
March, 1998. 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk of the 
Circuit Court 

By Barbara Mundin, Dqxity 
Cleric 

I ask for this: 

Robert J. Humphreys 

CommcMiwcalth's Attorney 

By Mary Y. Gessler 

Assistant Commonwealth's 
Attorney 

Office of the Commonwealth's 
Attorney 

2305 Judicial Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456- 
9050 

I, Mary Y. Gessler, Assistant 
Commonwealth's Attorney, after 
having first duly sworn, depose and 
state as follows: 

That pursuant to Section 8.01- 
316 of the Code of Virginia 
(1950), as amended, Uiat diligence 
has been used without effect to 
ascertain the location of the above 
listed parties. 

Mary Gessler, Affiant 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINL\ 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH, 
to- wit: 

I, Jaye Lee A. CuUen, a Notary 
Public in and for the City and State 
aforesaid, do hereby certify that the 
foregoing Affidavit of Mary Y. 
Gessler, Assistant 
Commonwealth's Attorney, was 
sworn to and subscribed to bdine 
me this 20th day of March, 1998 

Jaye Lee A. CuUen, Notary 
Public 

My Commission Expires: 
6/30/000 

14-2 
4t4-24 



Public Notice 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

TINA SAUNDERS RIDDLE, 
Complainant, v. 

PHILLIP B. RIDDLE. 2576 
Barwick Drive, Durham, North 
Carolina. 27704, Defendant. 

CHANCERY NO. CH98-1078 
ORDER OF PUBUCATION 

The object of this suit is for the 
complainant. TINA SAUNDERS 
RIDDLE, to obtain a divorce A 
VINCULO MATRIMONII from 
the defendant. PHILLIP B. 
RIDDLE, upon the grounds of 
separation in excess of six (6) 
months. 

It is ORDERED that PHILLIP 
B. RIDDLE, the defendant herein, 
appear and protect his interest, on 
or before May 26, 1998. which 
date is no sooner than fifty days 
after entry of this Order of 
Publication. 

And it is further ORDERED that 
this Order of Publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of general 
circulation in this City prescribed 
by this Court. 

Dated: March 31, 1998 

J. CURTIS FRUIT. CLERK 

By Bill Maull, Deputy Clerk 

15-4 
4t5-l 



Public Notice 



Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of the City of Virginia 
Beach will be held in the Council 
Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Municipal Center, 
Princess Anne Station, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on Tuesday, April 
28, 1998 at 6:00 p.m., at which 
time the following applications 
will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 

1. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Matilda Russell fa 
a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from A-12 
Apartment District and 0-2 (Xfkx 
District to R-5S Residential Single 
Family District on the east side of 
S. Kentucky Avenue, 183 feet 
south of Bonney Road on Lot 7-12 
& 13, Block 1, Midway. TTie 
proposed zoning classification 
change to R-5S is for single family 
residential land use on lots no less 
than 5000 square feet. TTie 
Comprehensive Plan recomm^ids 



wvmf^m0 ■^wp^bw^f 



VIRGINIA: IN THE JUVINILB 
AND DOMESTIC ^LATIONS 
DISTRICT COURT OF THE 




Steven B. Powers, M.D. 
Peter J. Kemp, M.D. 

Board Certified OBIGYN 

nt>^iliiig Family CoiterMi Pre-Natal 

Care • Birth Contoiri • GjmeoA^ 

& Lasn- Siv|^7 • HyMa«^>|9 

• IntoillityAlNMNinal 

Papt- Delected ft IVMtcd 

• ColpM^iv & Le^ 

436-0167 

680 Kmt^<m>uk S^ve 



use of this parcel for aiburban 
residential/medium & high density 
at densities that are compatible 
with townhouse and multi-family 
use in accratifflicewith other Plan 
policies. Said parcel contain 
20,996 square feet 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

2. An Ordinance upon 
Application of & R, Inc., a 
Virginia Corporation for a Change 
of Zoning District Classification 
from B-2 Community Business 
District & P-1 Preservation 
District to A- 18 Apartment District 
with a PD-H Planned Unit 
Development Overlay on certain 
property located at the ncffthwest 
intersection of Shore Drive and W. 
Stratford Road. The poposed 
zoning classification change to A- 
18 with a PD-H overlay is for 
multi-family land use at a (tensity 
no greater than 18 dwelling units 
per acre. The Comprehensive Plan 
recommends use of this parcel fca- 
marketplace corridor and natural 
resources/conservation use in 
accordance with other Plan 
policies. Said parcel is located at 
3800 Shore Drive and contains 
4.039 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

STREET CLOSURE; 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

3. Application of O & R, Inc., a 
Virginia Corporation, for the 
discontinuance, closure arel 
abandonment of a portion of 
Powhatan Avenue beginning on 
the west side of Powhatan Avenue 
and running between Lots 1 
through 4, Block 40 and Lots 5 
through 14, Block 46 as shown on 
the plat entitled "Survey of Right- 
of-Way Street Closure for a 
Portion of Powhatan Avaiue 
Located Between Block 40 and 46 
of Ocean Park" and recorded in Map 
Book 5, Page 132. Said parcel 
contains 35.594 square feet 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 

4. Application of Weldon T. Jr., 
and Gertrude A. Byrns for the 
discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of a portion of an 
unnamed street beginning at the 
southeast comer of the Norfolk an! 
Southern Raibxjad right-of-way and 
running in an easteriy direction a 
distance of 163.97 feet. Said parcel 
is SO feet in width and contains 
8,198.5 square feet. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

5. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Larry's Import 
Center, Inc., for a Conditional Use 
Peitnit (or an automobile lepoir - 
garage on the south side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, 150 feet 
more or less east of Riddle Avenue. 
Said parcel is located at 1803 
Virginia Beach Boulevard and 
contains 1 acre more or less. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

NONCONFORMING USE: 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH 

6. Application of Clearw^er 
Investment Associates, L.P., few 
the enlargement of a 
nonconforming use on the east side 
of Atlantic Avenue between 35th 
Street and 36th Street on Lots 1 
through 6, Block 82. Said parcel 
contains .1033 acres more or less. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Edward P. & Leslie 
A. Kappes a Conditional Use 
Permit for a miniature golf ccHirse 
with ice cream parlor at the 
northeast comer of Shore Drive and 
Red Tride Road on Lots 15, 17 & 
19, Block F, Lynnhaven Beach. 
Said parcel contains 22,500 square 



feet LYNNHAVEN BOROUGR 

All interested parties are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC/AAE 

City Cleric 

If you are physically disabled or 
visually impaired and need 
assistance at this meeting, pfease 
call the QTY CLERK'S OFFICE 
at 427-4303; Hearing impaired, call 
TDD only 427-4305 (TDD - 
TelejAonic Device fw the Deaf). 

15-1 
2t4-17 



Public Notice 



Take notice that on 4-5-98, at 
10:00 A.M. at the premises otf 
4747 ShOTC I^. Va Beach, Va. the 
undersigned will sell at Public 
Auction, for cash, reserving unto 
itself the right to bid. die 
following vehicle. 

1981 Chev. Truck. Serial 
#1GBGC24M9BB 133432 

1986 Fold Truck, Serial 
#1FDKE3042GHB 18527 

15-3 
lt4-10 



Public Notice 



TRUSTEE SALE 
5581 Old Guard Cres«nt 
Virginia Beach, VA 
In execution of a Deed of Trust 
from Pauline Edwards dalcd 
October 16, 1986 and recorctedin 
the Clerk's Office, Circuit Court, 
City of Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
in Deed Book 2587, page 273, 
securing a loan which was 
originally $70,100.00. De&ult 
having occurred in the payment (rf 
the Note thereby acured,andat the 
request of the holder of said Note, 
the ui^r»gned Substitute Trustees 
will offer for sale at public auction 
at the front steps of the City of 
Virginia Beach Circuit Courthouse 
Municipal Building #1, near the 
corner of Princess Anne & Nordi 
Landing, Virginia Beach, Virginia 
on May 15, 1998 at 8:15 A.M., 
the propmy desaibedin said Deed 
of Trust, located at the above 
address and briefly described as: 

Lot 3, Block G, as shown on 
that certain plat entitled, 
"Subdivision of Campus East 
Townhouses, Section One" Tax 
Map# 1468-14-9430. 

The prop«ty will be conveyed by 
Special Warranty Deed, subject to 
all existing easements, restrictions 
and any other conditions that may 
affect title to the property. The 
Notdioliter reserves die right to bid 
at the said sale. 

TERMS; CASH: A non- 
refundable deposit of $6,200.00, 
cash or certified check, will be 
required at die time of sale with die 
settlement and full payment of die 
purchase price within (15) fifteen 
days from the date of the sale. 
Additional terms will be annoimced 
at the time of sale and die 
successful bi(k^ will be required to 
execute and deliver to die 
Substitute Trustee a memorandum 
or contract of the sale at die 
conclusirai of bidding. 

This notice is an attempt to 
collect on a debt and any 
information obtained will be used 
for that purpose. Loan Type: FHA. 

NP983295 

FOR INFORMATION 
CONTACT: 

Nectar ftojects. Inc. 

Substitute Trastecs 

722 E. Maricet Sueet, Suite 104 

Leesburg, Virginia 20176 

(703) 777-3540 

15-5 
5t5-8 




; J «-j^^^^mai^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmimmmmmffft^^ 



€ Viigink Beach Sun. Friday, A|vil 10, 1998 




CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



PmSONAL 
RATES 

Itbne 
2 times 
4 times 



20 Words 

$ 7.50 
$13.50 
$ 22.50 



Addttional 
words 

.35 

.70 

1.40 



Run your Classified Ad four times for only $22.50. You can cancel 
your ad at any time. 

All Classilied Ads run in three newspapers (The Virginia Beach Sun, The Chesap- 
eake Post and The Portsmouth Times). No additional charge. 



Please ptlni clearly using only one word per box. 








































20 words 



Run my peraoray ad for . 
Payment Is enclosed $ . 



Issues. 



Make check payable to Byeriy PuUicattom 
MAIL TO: ClassMod, Box 1327, Chesapeake, Va. 23327 

Name 

Address 

City _^^_ 

FOR HELP with your Classified Ad, please call 547-4571. 

COMBINATION RATE: Run IM tami paraonal ad in any olhar BywV PublicaMont n«Mpap«r tor an 
addUoniil $3 on* Urn*. $5 Mm Ibnaa, V lour linm. Nampapwt In FranUin, Emporia. LawrancwM*. 
Oinwiddl* and Palanbuig. Call S47.4S7i lor dalalt. 



ADOPTIONS 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



AMPT - A loving couple wishes 
more than anything to raise your 
newborn with love, care and warmth. 
Medical/legal expenses paid. Strictly 
confidential. Please call LuAnn and 
Jeff at 1-800-710-7776. 

5/1 

ADOPTION: A beautiful choice 
made out of love and concern for 
your baby's future. Let us help. De- 
voted, childless couple bnging to 
share our love with a newborn. Will 
pay medical/legal costs. 'Judy & 
Steve 1-800-504-3292. 

4/17 



A LOVING COUPLE seeks new- 
born to complete our family, and to 
share its love, laughter and warmth. 
Stay at home Mom. Expenses paid. 
Susanne/Paul 1-800-975-5495. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



i LOST 35 POUNDS in 7 weeks and 
kept it off I All natural. For results call 
Austa, 428-7084. 4/10 



FREE CASH GRANTS! College. 
Scholarships. Business. Medk^al bills 
Never Repay. Toll Free 1-800-218- 
9000 Ext. G-15385. 

4/10 

LEARN HYPNOSIS 

Certification Weekend 

April 17-19 

Virginia Beach 

featuring 

Vicki McDonaki, ACH 

David A Willis, ACH 

Call Toll Free 

1-888-868-8377 

for a free brochure I 

4/10 

AUCTION - CHOWAN GALLERY 
Murfreesboro, NC. 

Next auction 4/23 - 6:13 pm (919- 
398-8020) 8 Hill. NC 
#1490,VA#^». 

4/17 



HERBAUFE Independent distribu- 
tors. For product call 456-1 698. For 
opportunity cadi ^6-1671 . 

4/10 



I, Stephen J. Vogal will not be re- 
sponsible for any debts unless con- 
tracted for myself. 
Stephen J. Vogel 

4/17 

GUARANTEED ADVERTISING 
RESULTS! Localized on-line adver- 
tising on the Internet Yellow Pages. 
Free report and info. 24 hours. Call 
545-1020. 

5/1 

FOLK DANCE PERFORMING 
GROUP. Dancers needed. Espe- 
cially men who enjoy dancing at fes- 
tivals and weddings. Similarto Busch 
Gardens Dance Group. Call Mike at 
486-6098 or 486-7349. 
5/1 

ROMANTIC GET-A-WAY Chesa- 
peake Bay sunsets from your win- 
dow. Close by escape in Cape 
Charles. Call 757-331-2424. 
www.baysunset bb.com. 

INTERNATIONAL COUNTRY 
DANaNG. Fridays, 7:30 at Newtown 
Elementary school. Various dance 
styles. Singles and couples wel- 
comed. Call 486-6098. 

5/1 



Retired Navy Master Chief John O. 
Parmele, Jr., asks for your vote. May 
5, 1 998. Virginia Beach City Council. 
Thanks! 4/24 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



PIANO WurlHzer, mahogany, ex- 
cellent condition, used approxi- 
mately 9 months to practice les- 
sons. $2200 nag. Call 424-13»). 
5/1 

MUST SELL! Double WWe Trailer. 
Already set up in park, owner financ- 
ing available, relocating to North 
Carolina. Call collect. Hal, 704-528- 
0848. 



1989 GMC Jimmy 4x4. Runs good, 
4.3 Voitex. $5995, negotiable. Call 
562-3021. 4/10 

SEIZED CARS from $175. 

Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevy's, 
BMW's Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 
4WD's. Your area Toll Free 1-800- 
218-9000 Ext. A-15385 for cun-ent 
listings. 

4/10 



BEAUTY SUPPLIES 



A BEAUTIFUL BODY could be 
yours! Your own! If I said you could 
have a beautiful body In 90 days, 
would you just call? 473-0473. 

4^ 

DRY, SORE, CRACKED h'Ii^NDS? I 

havefoundaremedyformine. It may 
help you ,too I Call me at 631-0716. 

4/24 

LOOK GOOD! FEEL GOOD! Call 
forproductandoppoilunlty, Herbalife 
Distributor. Free sample-Free infor- 
mation txjoklet. Call 363-7080. 

4/24 



BUILDING MATERIALS 



STEEL BUILDINGS, new, must sell 
40x60x14 was $16,200 sell $9,990 
50x 1 00x1 6 was $26,550 sell $ 1 8,990 
60X1 50x1 6 was $49,990 sell $29,990 
100x225x20 was $98,500 sell 
$69,990. Call 1-800-406-5126. 

4/17 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 



CONSIGNMENT 



KID'S STUFF CONSIGNMENT 
BOUTIQUE Stop, shop, save!! 
Make monay on Heme no longer 
uaad • ctothing, to^, baby needs. 
Mon-SaL,10-6PMCall^S-5437. 

5/1 



ANEW AVON Full time/Part time 
Reps needed In Tidewater area. 
Earn up to 50%. A fantastic oppor- 
tunity. Call 721-5622. 

^ 5/1 

ABSOLUTELY NO SELLING! 
Just restock displays. 65k-»- Pot'l. 
$4,500 investment includes inven- 
tory & accounts. 800-480-0031 . 

NASCAR UCENSED PRODUCTS 
BUSINESS. No selling. High Income 
restock profitable accounts. (Food 
Store & Dmg Stores) $15,995 Start- 
up required 1-800-221-1984. 



EARN THOUSANDS Stuffing enve- 
bpes. Send self-addressed, stamped 
envek>pe: J & D Inc., P O Box 24496, 
Rkihmond, Va 23224. 

4/24 



WORK FROM HCMilE Earn from 
$500 to. $8000 per month PT/FT 
Complete training provided. For In- 
formation call (757) 548-2656. 

4/17 

EARN THOUSANDS stuffing enve- 
lopes. Send self-addressed, stamped 
envelope: J& D Inc. PO Box 24426, 
Richmond, VA 24426. 



COKBPEPSi VENDING ROUTE 

Many high traffic sites. $2500 a week 
potential. Call 800-342-6653. 
5^ 

SNICKERS CANDY ROUTE 50 b- 

catbns, $800-1200 solid monthly in- 
come. Cost $2995. Hurry this woni 
last!1-800-i»9-3332. 

____^ 4/10 

FREE ! VISION & PRESCRIPTION 

drugscoverage with dental plan. 25% 
- 80% disc»unts. $15.00 month - 
Entire HousehoW. $9.00 month - In- 
dividuals. REPRESENTATIVES 
NEEDED No Insurance license or 
experience required. (757) 487-401 0. 

4/17 



AVON! Full and part-time help 
needed. MLM o|^bn is available. Up 
to 50% profits. Call 1 -800-565-8801 . 

4/17 



Service Directory 



ADULT CARE 



CHILD CARE 



ADULT CARE Excef«bnal^ nbe LOVING CARE - in my Sawyers 

home. Lovlf^ 24 hf. care. Sincere Meadow/Deep Cre^ home. Fenced 

ifKjuWw only, Ca« 919-5»-36«). yard. Wants weteome. Call 558- 

5/1 19». 



HOME NIIPROVEMENTS 



CMLOCAFS 



ft«3THERC^TVW3wiH provide (^M 
a»e « my tome, M-F, 6 M/l to 4 PM. 

un. 



SIESTA GARDEN AREA - Flexible 
hours. Military family. Any ^}». Rea- 
sonable rates . C^ 686-2782. 

DEEP CREEK CMLO CARE Mon- 
Fci 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. USDA q3pro\^, 
MM Rinsed. 2 yean «Ki up. 4^ 



m 43a>. 



WA11R POUUTKHI S(».Un(»ll 

Give your family the best water in 
town. Find out how. Call 543-9^3 
for a free demonstratbnll 

5^ 

ADVAMSED R(X»V«1 AltypesI 
F^^KMimt wMom, vkiyl ^big. 
U nb eBe vabV low|Mlewl UcertMd & 
bwufed. 4^-10^ 

4/10 



FARM EQUIP /VEHICLES 



HAGIE 280 Hl-boy diesel 800 gal. 
capacity hydrostatic 4wd. 12.4 - 28" 
tires 72 ft/60ft. boom variable row 
width wheel base. Call 757-654- 
9468. 4/10 



FINANCIAL 



A WAY TO STOP BANKRUPTCY 

Free debt consolidatbn applicalbn 
with services. Stop collecttan "calls. 
Fast Help. WE CARE! Call 1-800- 
517-3406. 



AVOID BANKRUPTCY Free debt 
consolidation w/applbatbn sen/lce. 
Cut payment to 65%. 24 hr. approval 
regardless of aedit. 1 -800-873-8207. 

5/1 



FLEA MARKETS / BAZAARS 



RIVERSIDE MALL & FLEA MAR- 
KET 350 Campostella Road, Nor- 
folk. Now open Sundays from 10-4 
Call 545-2407 for table reservations 
and additional info. 

4/24 



Pembroke Manor United 

Church of Christ. 

600 Independence Blvd. 

3rd Saturday of each month 8 ' 

SHOP OR SELL 

For reservatbn/informatbn 

Call 456-9106 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



MILTON'SMART/DELI Homemade 
hot & mild sausage. All types of 
smoked pork items - hams, bacon. 
Dan Doodles, Whole pigs. Suffolk. 
VA Call (757) 986-2721. 

4/17 



HELP WANTED 



INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE 

Seeking experienced mechanical 
and electrbal technicians for evening 
and graveyard shifts. Positions re- 
quire routine equipment mainte- 
nance, responding to breakdowns, 
and troubleshooting and repair of 
manufacturing equipment and re- 
lated systems and controls. Com- 
petitive pay, career growth opportu- 
nities and comprehensive benefits 
package that includes medbal, den- 
tal, prescriptions, eye care, educa- 
tional assistance, 401 K, and many 
other outstanding features. Send 
resume to Brenco. Inc. John Sheffeb. 
P O Box 389, Petersbu^, VA 23804. 

4/10 

lOOO's POSSIBLE TYPING PART- 
TIME AT HOME Toll Free (1) 800- 
218-9000 Ext T-15385 for listings. 

Excellent income $28-$42,000/yr. 
Plus working with military families. 
For interview call Mr. Sullivan at 460- 
4010. 

4«4 



ORIGINATORS Need 2 experien(»d 

originators. New company in Chesa- 
peake. Fax only: 547-4505. Contact 
James Stamps. 

4/24 

CO-AUTHORTTYPIST - Three his- 
torbal novels, one open. History and 
computer majors preferred. Movie 
Rights. Call 362-4704 for informa- 
tion. 

4/10 

ROOFERS NEEDED up to $15^r. 
experienced only need apply. Nags 
Head ,NC. 919-441-3405. 

4«4 

HELP WANTS) kton/Women earn 
$375 w9Mjf pio<^Ming^»«mbling 
Medeal I. D. Carito at heme. Imme- 
diate e^nings. Yotw lo^ area. Ex- 
perience unne(^nary, wM tntfn. Call 
Medbard at 1-541-386-5290, ext. 
7174-A. 

4^4 





LEARN ABOUT THE WORLD, 

never leave your home. Host a stu- 
dent from GERMANY. Students are 
interested in sharing their culture and 
learning ours. They like sports, golf, 
swimming, art, musb, and reading. 
Arrive in August. They have own 
spending money and insurance. 
Other Scandinavian, European, 
South Amerban and Asian students 
also available. Call 1-800-SIBLING 
today or visit the web site at 
www.sibling.org. American Intercul- 
tural Student Exchange a non profit 
tax exempt educational program. 

4/10 



CAU NETWORK J 
I CLASSIFIEDS ^ 

BLANKET ALL VIRGINIA 

Ad Network Classifieds are 

published in 78 state newspapers. 

4 million plus readers. 

25 WORDS $225. 

(For more than 25 words there is an additional 
charge of $8.00 per word.) 

Call 547-4571 



for Classified Representative 



WOLFF TANNING BEOS. TAN AT SAWMILL $3795. Saws logs Into 9045. 
HOME. Buy DIRECT *nd SAVEI boardt. planka, baama. Large ca- 

Commareial/Homa unita Ifom pacify. Best sawmill value anywhara DRIVEfiS. LOCAL WEEKEND 
$199.00. Low Monthly Payments. Free inlormation. Nonnood Sawmills. TRAINING lor Tractor Trailer Oriv- 
FREE Color Catalog. CALL TO- 90 Curlwrlghl Drive «3, Amherst, NY era. Financing and Job Placement 
DAY 1-800-842-1310. 14221. 1-800S78-1363. Available. 0NLY8WEEKENDS0R 

3 WEEKS FULLTIME Shippers 
CREDIT CARD PROBLEMS? Debt DIABETES? Are you still paying lor Choice ol VA. Inc. I •800/646-2374. 
Consolidation. Avoid Bankruptcy, suppllea? Why? For inlormation on 

Stop Creditor Calls. Cut Interest how you can receive supplies at litlle LEADS LEADS LEADS National 
No Credit Checl< One Low Pay- or no coat call 1 ■800-678-5733. Company seeks local llcenaed Lite 
mem. National Consolidatora. Inc. Insurance Agents to sell Final Ex- 

(800)270-9894. HOMEOWNERS WANTED! Kayak pense. Lead support. Advances paid 

Pools looking for demonstration daily Call Pal at 1-800-433-8181. 
DRIVER. . $30,000 First Year Po- homesltes to display new malnle- 

fanfial! Hiring Drtversl No Experi- nance free Kayak Pools Save thou- tST 1 2N0 MORTGAGES FAST, 
enceNecessaryl Training Availablel 8andsol$$.Unk)ueoppottunity! 100% Any Credit Rating No Uplront Fees. 
NewPayPackage,Consistentmlles, financing available. 800-510-5624. Easy Payment Plans Great Rales. 
Job Stability, Assigned Equipment. CallChariesTonayat804-282-0605 

Swill Transponation. 1-800-347- ABSOLUTE AUCTION For Sergeant's orl-800-269-13lt.CrosstateMott- 
4698 (eoe-m/f). Pel Products Selling: FotklHts, Air gage 

Compreaaor. Shop Equipment 8 
■CASH" IMMEDIATE $$lor alruc- Tools, Computer, Olfice, Lab Equip- ABANDONED HORSE FARM. 10 
lured settlements and deferred in- meni, More! Thurs. . April 23, 1 AM ACRES « HOUSE $49,900 Gently 
suranceclaims J.G Wenlworlhl- on Site 2258 Darbytown Rd, Rich- rolling, Paslureland Call Owner 
888-231-5375. mond. Call lor Terms/Into MACI (804) 374-8499 

AUCTIONEERS INTL. 804-355-2 1 00. 
LOCAL CANDY ROUTE. 30 Vend- VAAL •102. UKE GASTON VA/NC-New 3 bed- 

Ing Machines. Earn api. SSOtVday. room 2 1/2 bath, 2 bonus rooms, 

Alllor$9,995.Ca«1-800-998-VEND. ACR METAL ROOFING & SIDING cenlralvac Stereo, dishwasher, range 
lor Agricultural, Commerlcal & Resi- w/grill, large deck, boat dock. 
AD «6 $$AVON$$ Polential $200- denllal. Low Cost. Guaranteed 20 Merrymount Sub, Owner/Agent Call 
$2000permonth Sell where 4 when yrs. We cut to the Inch Fast deliveryl Tanglewood Realty, 1-800-338-8616, 
you like, its not just door to door Free Literalura, 1-717-656-1814. P.O. Box 116, Bracey, VA 23919. 
anymore. Medical/other Insurance 

available 1-800-288-631 l.lnd. Rep. BECOME A MEDICAL TRANSCRIP- PUBLIC AUCTION COMMON- 
TIONIST OPPORTUNITY TO WORK WEALTH OF VIRGINIA WEDNES- 
Assemble Arts, Crafts and toys in AT HOME OR IN OFFICE TYPING DAY 'APRIL 15, 1998 '10:00 AM 
your spare time. Also serving typ- FOR DOCTORS, HOME STUDY. CENTRAL GARAGE MOTOR 
ing and computer work Great pay. FREE LITERATURE. P.C.D.I., AT- POOL2400WESTLEIGHSTREET, 
Call 1-800-632-8007. LANTA, GEORGIA. 800-362-7070 RICHMOND, VIRGINIA APPROXI- 

DEPT, YYE738. MATELY83VEHICLES,VANS,SE- 

Driver OTR COVENANT TRANS- DANS, ETC, '14-1990, 3-1989 

PORT Major Pay Increase Com- PRESSURE CLEANERS Factory CHEVROLET CAVALIERS'I3- 
ing-$t,000 Sign-On Bonus Expert- Direct Salelll 2800 PSI $599, 3500 1991 FORDTEMPO'8-1993, 1994 
encedDrtvera -Average Run 1800 PSI $799, 4000 PSI $989, 4500 PSI PLYMOUTH SUNOANCE'19-1992 
Miles-Health/Lile Insurance Avail- $1449. Lowest Prices Guaranteedtll DODGE SHADOW' 1989-CHEV- 
able First Day On Truck. Expori- FREE catalog. 1-800-786-9274, 24 ROLET CAPRICE'1992, 1993, 
encedDnvera/Owner Operators Call Hours. CROWN VICTORIA'1990 ALU- 

1-800-441-4394.GraduateStudents MINA'1989 BUICK CENTURY 

Call 1-800-338-6428. Driver-Earn up to $800 per week '1993 GRAN PRIX'1990 IMPALA 

your lirsl year with USA TRUCK! '1988 FORD VAN'1987 DODGE 
Swimming Pool's $887 New 1997 Late-model convenhonals with sat- RAMCHARGER'3-1983, 1985, 
Factory Left Over Model's. Hugh ellite, no slip seating and weekly pay. 1987, 1968DODGEVAN't982PLY- 
19X31X4' Deep. ComesComplele 800-237-4642. EOE. M/F/H/V. MOUTHVOYAGER'2-1985, 1987, 

With Giant Size Sun Deck, Safely 1988F0RDVAN'1994GMCJIMMY 

Fence, In Pool Ladder. Liner, Fll- TEACHER/MINORITY JOBFAIRMay (TOTALED) & OTHERS FOR A 
ter. Pump i Motor Inslallalion and leth 9:00 AM-t 00 PM, Roanoke COMPLETE LISTING CONTACT 
Financing Available. No Bankrupl- Rapids, NC 20 Nonheastern NC STATE SURPLUS PROPERTY 
cy's. Call 24 hrs 1-800-447-7207. School Systems on sMe for informs- (804) 236-3666 OR VISIT 

llon/inlefviews. For inlormation call WWW.DGS.STATE.VA.US/DPS 
WOLFFTANNINQBEDSSolklsteel, 919.S37-14g5 E-mail \ 

lull body tanning beds New/Used davisf,coerrgsd.schoolllnk.nel CARING AND ASSERTIVE PER- 
Financing available. Forlreecala- SONWORKINQIromhomepanime. 

log call: 1-800-537-91 13-(804-7S7 ADORABLE AND AFFORDABLE Placing and counseling ntematnnal 
area code) 1 ■800-447-0040-(540- WEDDINGS! In the Smoky MIn. Log teenagers lor summer or school 
703 area code) Chapel All services provided Includ- year Commissioned income Be- 

ing lormal wear, honeymoon rentals nus/travel incentive. (888) 576-2235/ 
DONATE YOUR CAR, Heritage For Ordained Ministers Dollywoodcoun- (757) 460-2464 
the Blind. Tax Deductible. Free try. Belora deciding call 1-800-262- 

Towlng, Free Phone Card to Do- 5683. SOUTHWESTERN FREIGHT CAR- 

norsw/Ad»1285 1-800-2-Oonate. RIERSANewDivisionolBurtinglon 

A BEKA TEXTBOOKS & VIDEO Motor Carriers, Inc has initialed a 
ASSISTED CARE RESIDENCES, SCHOOL on diaplay near you. Con- Lease Purchase Program lor OTR 
seven Virginia locations Licensed tact us at www,abBka.com/nc2 or 1- Drivers & Owner Operators lor pur 
24-hour ambulalory/nonambulatory 800-874-2353 axl. 29 for more infer- Conventional Kenworth FWit ' NO 
care, from $1,000 American Re- matlon, Downpaymanl. Liberal Payback 

tiremeni Homea, Chartottesville. 1 ■ Schedule! "Premium Pay "Updated 

800-999-6637 YOUR OWN TRAVEL AGENCY, lo- Benefits "Loads to Get You Home 

cally. $7,900, financing available Pt/ - Work With The Best - We Make It 
ATW, Inc. Tractor/Trailer Drivers. Ft. Fun! Easy! (Great $$$i|Oulstand- Happen For Our Drivers! Call 800- 
All Teams, All East-West All Hood- ing travel/tax benefits. Comprehen- 968-8743, Ext 141 or 125. 
Condos, Trip Average 5,800 Miles, sive training. Free video Motivated 

Top Pay Package 800-948-6723 applk:ants:e00-811-3553exlVA84 CHRISTIAN DATING SERVICE 

SINCE 1989 COUNTLESS RE- 
HOMEOWNERS call CoramonPoinI DRIVERS-WE DELIVER FOR SO- UTIONSHIPS THOUSANDS OF 
Mortgage today and get the cash LOS t TEAMS Induatry'a lop miles AVAILABLE SINGLES. MEET NEW 
you need. Eliminate high-interest 4co«st-lo-coa8tnjns,air96orn«wer FRIENDS THROUGH LOCAL IN- 
credil card debt, repair damaged canvcntlanala.TeamaslartuptoSei/ TROOUCTIONSI FREE DATING 
credit or make home improvements mUe with bonus. Great benefit pack- PACKAGE, CALL 1-800-399-1994. 
1-800-968-2221. afle. Solos starting up to 30(/mile 4 

annual raises to 35(, 23 with 1 year FRIENDLY T0Y4CIFTS has im- 
ATW, Inc Owner-Operator Teams OTR. Call J-MAR 1-888-216-5627 mediate openings in your area. 
All EastWesi, Earn $170,000 ♦ p/ Number One In Party plan: Toys, 

yr 800-948-6723. ABSOLUTE AUCTION-Sat., April gifts, Christmas, Homedecor. Free 

18th, 10 AM. "Crow Harris Farm", catalog and inlormation. 1-800- 
PRIVACYHEDGE-UalandCypress Lynchburg. VA Real Estate & com- 488-4875. 
(Evergreen) Fast growing-Complete plete line of modem larm machinery 

privacy Spring liquidation 3 ft.tree/ Call for brochure Counts Really 8 DRILLER/BLASTER ■ VA Certified 
regular $29.95. Now only $9.95. AuclionCo. 1-800-780-2991 VAAF93 Blasters License - Valid Driver's 
Gtd and Free delivery - 1-800-908- Lteense, Orug-freeVacalion and 

0496. NEED A LOAN? We can help! Con- Profit Sharing. EOE Call 1-804- 

solidale Credit Cards Fast Results!!! 798-861 2 or Fax Resume 804-752- 
REFINANCE4SAVE$100sEACH Good or Bad Credit (888)667-8893 6764 
MONTH WHh Today's Low Mort- Liberty Associates. 

gage Rates Consolidate debt, im- DRIVERS • Change Is Good! 

prove your home or gel needed Financial Problems for all Purposes 37Cents*lile Is Even Better ..That's 
cash with Fairbank Mortgage "24- Consolidate Mortgages, Businesses, our average driver payroll package 
hour pre-approvals'Quick Closings no Collateral, and No Up-Front Fee - team pay is even greater In addi- 
"Compelilive Rates Custom Pro- Call 1-800-660-0608 (10-6 EST), lion we oiler a benefits package 
grams For Every Need "Good 8 Arkwood Sereices that's aecond to none: assigned 

problem credH "No-Income Vertfi- conventlnala, teams 8 solos. OTR 

cation "Self employed "Bankruptcy ALL MALE CHAT LINE privale con- runs and 1 00% company pak) in- 
"125% Equity Financing We Bend neclions. Bulletin Board, (800)776- surance lor the entire lamily. Gel 
Over Backwards To Approve Your 6S53,$l,25/min.VISA/MC (900)637. allthedelails.Call: Con-Way Tnjck- 
Loan FAIRBANK MORTGAGE 1- 6266, $1.69/min. 18* NPP Reno, NV. load Senneea. 1 -800-SSS-CWTS, 
800-346-5626 exi. 562 VA Lk: ML Qrainer Adv. 250 Newport Center EOE 
251 Dr., Newport Beach, C A 92660 

Coordinator - International student 
DEPENDS(r), WINGS (r).Adiilt die- SPRING ANTIQUES 8 COL- organization SMks Individual with 
pers at wholesale prices delivered LECTIBLES, MAY 1-2, CARLISLE school and community conlacia lo 
10 your home. MEDICAID recipi- PA FAIRGROUNDS HUNDREDS OF place and supenrise exchange slu- 
enla may be eligible to gel these DEALERS SELLING UNIQUE AN- dents in host families. Training, 
products FREE! Call HomeCareDe- TIQUES AND COLLECTIBLES compensation Call Carol 
livered 1-800- 565-5644, FURNITURE, GLASSWARE, CLOTH- 1(88a)CETUSA-9 

ING, JEWELRY, MUCH MORE (717) 
MEDICARE RECIPIENTS are you 243-7»56. TANNING BEOS. Finally, tanning 

using a NEBULIZER MACHINE? salon quality tanning beds for the 

STOP paying full prce lor Albuterol, DAIRY QUEEN needs Managers to home. Guaranteed saUslactlon or 
Atrovent.elc. Solutions MEDICARE »«ort< on Outerbanks of North Caro- you money back. FINANCINQ 
will pay for them We bill MEDI- line BenefHs and pay dependant on AVAILABLE. $4S,0OanH)nth. CM 
CARE lor you and ship directly to experience. Housing poealbte. Fax today 1-800-892-5015. 
your door. MEO-A-SAVE. 1-800- Re*umelo:919-48O-3033arcall919- 

538-9849, 480-3037. SPRING BREAK RENTALS - 

Hudeon Rentala NMB, SC 1 -S bed- 
FUTURE TRUCKERS OF AMERICA EXCELLENT PROFITS LOG HOME room units close to ocean. Good 
COLTrrttkigNoExpeiienceNeeded WHOLESALERS- JolnprovenlByr through May 9. Call 1-800-588-1092 
Ptacemanl Department Financing Log Manufacturer 16 Kilndned tog or 843-249-2464, 
Available You May Qualify lor Gov- styles starting $ 1 2 1 90 OO E xclusive 

ernmeni Funds 1-800-610-3777. territory Mr Buck 1-800-321-5647 COOKWARE-ExcltlngI Heavy- 
1095-A West Dlaie Drive Aahboro, Okt Timer Log Homes weight, dinner party type! 100% 

NC 27203 Walertess! Surgical sia»<less steell 

PICK BASIC AND/OR IBM AS400 7-ply, 17-piece se|i At parties 
DEBT C0NSOLIDATI0N$. Cut PROGRAMMERS NEEDED FOR $1,499 00 NOW $395,001 Free 
monthly payments up to 30-50% EXPANDING FORTUNE 500 COM- $75 00 cullery set! Lifetime war- 
Reduce inlereet Stop collecllon PANY RELOCATING TO THE AREA rantyl 1-800-434-4K8I 
calls Avoid bankruptcy FREE SIX WEEK VACATION YEARLY- 

conlkJentialhe*), Genus Ct«il Man- GREAT SIGNING BONUS SEND CA$H NOW! We buy payments 
agemeni Non-profit, licensed/ RESUMES: COLEEN OHARA, PO facewed from annuities, insurance 
bonded 1-800-318-3652 SOX 1 025 HAODONFIELD.NJ 08033; Mflla™"!'. VSI. lotteries, milHary 

FAX (888) 389-5554 pensions, seller-linancad mort- 

TAN AT HOME DON'T kiAKF A 9*9«>. notes, inheritances Best 

HUGE rn^stake Comoar. the ^^"*° CARLISLE. APRIL 23-26, Prteesi 1-800-722.7472 Advance 

t^r^Z,%.\x%^^ EXCITEMENT. 8,100 SPACES DRIVERS WANTED PROFES- 
eatatog.Finane.ng 1-800-533-7282 filled WITH COLLECTOR CARS SIGNAL OTR T/T DRIVERS ONLY 
STEBL BlJlimNO qAif q*vP P*flTS, ACCESSORIES, SUW.IES WE HIGtCY MOTIVATED SAFETY 
;J. L ""^''"*" *r ■= (71 7)243-7855 ORIENTED NEED APPLY WE OF- 

45%_^(»o Mewnan. Spnng/Sum- " * "» pg„ 3,^ truCKS-BIQ HOOOS 

mei/F«IDe«*«y 20X30$3.249.00 SOUTHEAST REGIONAL RV SALE BIS MILAGE-BIG BUCKS AND 
fSv^*''^^'?.?'^'*''*''*' Al»««''»M«*0'M»nu««*uf»f«H«P- MORE! FOR MORE INFO ON OUR 
40X60 $7,760 00 56X90 f,,^^g^F|ieteryLe»owrt/Oe«no'a/ 48 STATE OPERATION CALL 
■ ™ ^^"^ OSiera. Pio- Low Mlluga Ua«t/AH UnMe Priced ELITE EXPRESS AT (800) 441- 
near 1-800-888-5422. To Sell Imrrndiately Call 1-800 305- 4318 



Even EZ-er than 1040EZ. 

InbtKJuciiv TeleFtle from the IRS. If you ve (ingle and filed 

Form 1040EZ bit year, you can file your tax return in ten minutes 

by phone. Anytitnc. Check your tax booklet for infonnation. 

C^^^forp*d. Ifi free. It'i fat. It woriu. 



31 



^^^F" ■" -^ '^ ' 



Virginia Beach Sun, Friday. April 10, 1998 7 




Classifieds 



CALL TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 



HOMES /SALE 



3BDR, 1-1«BATH, 2471 8q ft home 
with garage at 1513 McDaniel St 
Needs work $51 ,950 w/seller financ- 
ing, offers considered. Cali Eddie. 
Property Sales dept., 1-800-757- 
9201, ext 2033 (Pojific Time). 
4/3 

COUNTRY UVING Private 5 acres. 
3 BR 2 BATH Ranch between Empo- 
ria and Lawrenceville. Best buy at 
$79,500. George Robinson, Coun- 
try Property Specialist 804-949-7837 
Robinson Realty 1-800-998-871 1. 
4/24 

SAWYER'S CREEK LANDING-NC 

3 milesfrom Camden Courthouse on 
Sawyer's Creels Road. Call David 
Sawyer at 919-453-4456. 

4/17 



NC-NEW HOMES! We have them 
under construction at all times. Call 
for current information. 919-264- 
3373. Hurdle & Webb Construction 
Company. 4/17 

3 BR, 2 BA - EUZABETH aTY 

Remodeled kitchen and bath $49,900 
Call 919-333-1168. 

4/17 



GOVT FORECLOSED homes from 
pennies on $1. Delinquent Tax, 
Repo's. REO's Your area. Toll free 
(1 ) 800-9000 Ext H 1 5385 for current 
listings. 

4/17 



INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 



BOXCARS/FLATCARS 1 4 Boxcars 
for sale. Great for onsite storage, 
off ees, etc. 1 3 f latcars for sale. CoukI 
be used for brkJges, etc. Please call 
and leave mesage for details. 1-864- 
422-1128. South Carolina. 

4/17 



JOB OPPORTUNITY 



GREAT 2ND CAREERS National 
company seeks a few indivkluals 
getting ready to retire/separate. Ex- 
cellent income $28-$42,000/yr. Plus 
working with military families. For 
interview call Mr. Sullivan at 460- 
4010L 

4/24 



AVON! Full and part-time help 
needed. MLM optk>n is available. Up 
to 50% profits. Call 1 -800-565-8801 . 



LANOSCAPINQ 



PUNGO LANDWORKS iwlll land- 
•cap*. plant, care for and main- 
tain a beautiful garden for you year 
around! Mulch - you pick up, 
$1 7.99. Delivered, $22.99. 434-7449 

S/1 



LOST AND FOUND 



LOST • Handsome young, black and 
white neutered male cat, TAZZY. 
Vicinity of Sparrow Rd. May have 
gotten in a vehksle. REWARD! 424- 
7292. 



LOTS FOR SALE 



LOTS FOR SALE - ELIZABETH 
CITY, Forest Park, Peartreo Place, 
Rivenvood. Gene Meads, 919-338- 
6354. 4/17 



MODELS 



MODELS/ACTORS Wanted. Metro 
Modeling is seeking models and ac- 
tors for print & commercial work. Call 
518-8164 for an interview. 



HORSES & CATTLE 



ARENAS AND BARNS Factory 
Deals from 24 x 36 to 70 x 150. Will 
deliver, can put up Must order by 
April 30th. Call Davkl at (757) 877- 
2693. 



QUIET SHOP SADDELRY 
English RWing Apparel & Equipment- 
Horse & Fox Gifts-Antkiues. 
In Churchland 483-9358. 
Wed-Sat 10am -5pm. 

4/10 



Dominion Wholesale Pottery 

Concrete Lawn & Garden statuary in the unique "crafters 
mall" Baxter Run Shopping, 4740 Baxter Rd., Virginia Beach, 
VA. Booth : W03 Grafter's Mall - 499-1 559. 
Home Office - 485-7055 
Internet Web Page Design 
Call 485-7055 
See our website at ht^)n(vww.erds.com/llb1/index.html 





PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



MOBILE HOMES /SALE 



ELIZABETH CITY - MARCH MAD- 
NESS SALE All singlewides, $2500 
off. Limited time only . At Luv Homes 
919-338-3113. 

4/17 



OFFICE SPACE 



NEWIN EUZABETH CITY Halstead 
Blvd. Professional and Executive 
Center. 880 Sq. Ft. and up. Call 91 9- 
338-3453 or 919-331-2080. 

4/17 



PETS 



LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPS 

Knotts Island family raised. Well 
cared for. Shots & wormed. Paper 
trained. Ready April 10. $300. Call 
429-9225 (evenings) Local call. 

4/10 



HALF DOBERMAN / HALF 
ROTTWEILLER puppies. Available 
now! $95.00 each. Nags Heaad, NC, 
1-800-498-4706. 

4/10 



Place your classified ad 
today. Call 547-4571. 



. NEED A LOAN 

Try consolkJating. One tow monthly 
payment. 1-800-533-4485. Feder- 
ated Financial Services. 

4/24 

UNIQUE SERVICES INC. Lk»nsed. 
Let us save you time and money. 
We'll arrange housekeeping, child/ 
elder care, shopping, complete par- 
ties, offk;e support, etc. etc. Please 
call 757-451-1469. 4/24 



CHESSON TRANSFER 

Insured Carriers 

Serving Tidewater for over 40 years 

Home/Office Moving 

Pianos 

Free estimates 

1 844 Alantic Ave. 

Chesapeake, VA 545-1 793 

4/10 

QUICK QUALITY MONITOR RE- 
PAIR Flat rates/6 month warranty. 
Most repairs 2 days or less. Recon- 
ditioned monitors for sale. 1 1 68 First 
Opionial Road. Ste. 3, Virginia Beach, 
Va 496-5207. 

4/24 

EUMINATE DIS-EASES 

Dr. Johnson (ALOE MAN) 

Luncheon April 1 8th - Holiday Inn, 
Portside, 10:30 AM. Call 757-399- 
6093. $20.00. 



CHAPTERS 

& FLEA 

MARKETERS 

NEEDED 

Brian Center's Annual 
Carnival to be held on May 
16, 1998 is expanding and 

will this year feature a 

Craft Show and Sale and 

a Flea Market 

Hours: 11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 
Booth space available $5.00 

Call Barbara Childrey 
(804) 848-4766 



ARVON 



Home Health Care 

We have an 
immediate need for: 

• RN's • COMPANIONS 

• LPN'S • NURSE AIDES 

• CNA'S 

Flexible hours in homecare 
•taffing and primte duty. We 
offer the beet pqr and laenefits! 

• HOMECARE 

• STAFFING 

• PRIVATE DUTY 

Call ARVON Staffing at 

499-9900 

for an appointment today! 

We also ofTer a 

Certified Nursing Aide Program 

call for more information. 




Freight Railroad 

Conductor 

Training 

Your Ticket to the 
Railroad Industry 

Starting Salary: 
$30,000 Plus 

Positions Available in: 

• Baltimore, MD 

• Brunswidt, MD 

• Cumberland. MD 

• Clifton Forge. VA 

• Richmond. VA 

Guaranteed Intwview with dass 1 
RR upon completion of 5 week 
course in Phitade^hia. 

Your placement location is 
assigned prior to start of dass 

Course Fee: $3,950 

Approved for Veteran's Training 

and Credit Union Loans 

FOR INFORMATION 

PACKET CALL: 

(888)742-1616 

Community College 

of Philadelphia 

Divlston of 

Community Services 



I: 



RECIPES 



DELICIOUS FAMILY CHICKEN 

recipe. Mail money order $2.50 to: 
R. Pugh 6305 Ardsley SQ. #201 A 
Virginia Beach. VA 23464. 



APTS/ FURNISHED 



ONE BEDROOM APARTMENTS 

Furnished and Unfurnished. Close 
to Little Creek and NOB Bases. Call 
Jeff/Gwen at 430-9392 or 430-9079. 

4/24 



All ■€!■•«■« 



iWpl€Uf0your 
in this section, 
mil S47'4$71 



BUCHANAi\i 
AUCTION COMPANY 

Auction Every Saturday! 
Gates Open 8:30 a.m. 
Sale Begins 9:1 5 a.m. 

• REPOSSESSIONS 

• CONSIGNMENTS 

Public Invited! 

3856 S. Military Highway, Chesapeake 
VAAF 000123 757-485-3342 



For as little as $25, tfie 
giftofaU.S. Savings 
Bond will be around 
after other gifts are 
opened and broken. So 
start buying U. S. 
Savings Bonds where 
you bank or at work 
through your 
employer's payroll 
savings plan. 

Call toll free: 

1-800-4USBOND 

(1-800-487-2663). 



U. S. Savings Bonds. The Gift of a Lifetime. 
ww^^savingsbonds.gov 



( I \UU M Ii\ll 



5.59% 

Series EE U.S. 
Savings Bondk Rate 



Take; 

Stock'.. , 
In America 



mmGs 

[BONDS 




■fof Bonds issued NovemDei 199? Itirougli April 19M. Savings Bonds rales are compounded semiannually values increase 
monttily A ne« raie is applied eveivsin monllis allei puictiase Bonds redMnied betoie live yeais Have a }-montti mleresl 
penally Ihe minimum puicnase is E5 tor a $50 Smes EE txind and m« minimum holding pwiod is sk monins 
Savings Bonds' infetesl is enempl liom siaie and local income taxes and is le*iilly lai-dileiied lor op to 30 years In some 
cases Savings Bonds inleiesi may also be Meially Ui-eiempt l« college «llRSputilicilionSS0andForm86l5lor 
details Wiile U S SAVINGS BONDS, DEPARTMElft Of THE TREASURy. PAflWRSBURG, WV 26106-1328 



WELCOME TO THE 21ST CENTURY 




The U.S. NAVY has tomorrow's technology today. The NAVY has 
jobs in more than 60 exciting career fields that can put you on the 
leading edge of some of the world's most advanced technology. 

You can get the finest high-tech training now, and prepare for a 
bright, solid tomorrow — in or out of the Navy. 

Navy. Full Speed Ahead. 




Time to get rid of that stuff in 

The Attic 



Wiiy not take out a classified ad? 

Just fill in and clip out the coupon 

on the opposite page and mail it in. 




ii.g|i.li.Ki|iJl! i. 



.^%%%*^^'*--.--*..*J*'Ju.--JJilt>ii*».MPIRPPBiPWiBiP« 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



S Virginia Beach Sun, Friday, ^iril 10, 1998 



HOPE for Kids needs a boost 



CofrtbiuMl ^om ^« 1 

"The goal is to get a ninety 
percent rate for immunizations by 
the year 2000," said Versagc. "That 
is the president's goal and ours. 
The Columbia Study said that 
HOPE for Kids has proved 40 
percent more successful than any 
other outreach." 

The organization participated in 
the President's Summit on 
Volunteerism in Philadelphia last 
year and wants to meet die 
president's goal of volunteoism. 

"We are right behind him in his 
efforts on that," Verss^e said. 

Volunteers will be armed with 
packets of information, including 
two coupons for free shots, a 
coloring book from the Virginia 
Department of Health, a schedule 
of places within the cities to go for 
immunizations, a brochure called 
"Shots for Tots" that desaiTjes 
esome diseases and their symptoms, 
and a flyer about hq)atitis B, a 
disease that is more easily spaad 
than AIDS but is easily curable if 
caight. 

Befoc sending out the volunteers 



on April 18 they will need to 
attend a Gaining session on April 
14 before at 7 p.m. in Virginia 
Beach to familiarize tl^mselves 
wid) the information. 

Tlw five sets of series include 
immunizations against the "Big 
10" diseases — hepatitis B, 
diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, 
polio, Hib disease, measles, 
mumps, rubella and chicken pox. 

During the day while the 
volunteers are canvassing 
neighborhoods and hoping to link 
the children and their parents to a 
health care provider, mobile health 
vans will be at Mount Trashmore 
providing immunizations to those 
children whose parents bring their 
immunization records with them. 

With its beginning in 1993, 
HOPE for Kids is a national 
organization with programs in 
approximately 60 cities. This is 
the second year that the local 
ch^t»^ has been in existoice. The 
group performs a variety of other 
community-friendly activities. 

Last Christmas they held a drive 
which provided toys for the 



CANDII House, Union Mission 
and Social Services. In February, a 
serve-a-thon in February raised 
money for IBoptions^tnd orphans. 
Instead of walking, members 
pledged their time to the 
community performing activities 
such as cleaning the local health 
clinic. 

"All money raised went to the 
orphans and the adoptions," said 
Vcrs^e. 

Although the April 
immunizations drive is their 
biggest |nt)ject, another later drive 
is being considoed for this fall. 

To encourage immunizations, 
HOPE for Kids has framed 
collaborative partnerships with the 
fed^Bl and state governments, local 
health departments. Centers fra- 
Disease Control and Prevention, 
health care providers, and key 
corporations. 

In 1996, more than one million 
children were personally ctmtacted 
and several thousand were 
successfully immunized because of 
the combined efforts of the national 
HOPE for Kids. Nationally there 



are more than 30,000 waive 
volunteo's. 

HOPE for Kids is woiking with 
the Consortium for Infant and 
Child Health (CINCH). Project 
Immunization Virginia (PIV), 
Social Services, Virginia Beach 
Health Partners, Hampton and 
Portsmouth coalitions and the 
Virginia Beach Health Department 
to target neighborhoods in each 
city. The heaviest canvassing is 
expected to be in Virginia Beach, 
Portsmouth and Norfolk. 

The local HOPE for Kids 
program eventually plans to cffa 
the HOPE for Kids MIA (Missed 
Immunization Appointments) 
program to track the immunization 
rate of under served children from 
infants to two years old. Through 
this program, immunization rates 
for children in this age group have 
increased in 20 cities throughout 
the United States. 




For more information about 
HOPE for Kids or to sign up for 
the training session call, 456- 
1547. 



Roman holiday 



Elizabeth Watkins of Virginia Beach is one of 100 students from the 
University of Dallas spending the spring semester at the university's 
study-abroad campus in Rome, Italy. Every year about 200 of die 
students, mostly sophomores, spend a semester in the Italian capital. 
While there they study and experience the art. architecture, philoso- 
phy and cteeds that formed the basis of Western dvllizaflon. 



Health department consolidation easier on public 



ConUnuad From Pag* 1 

all of die services together in one 
spot, so we can better coordinate 



service delivery to the 

community and provide 
comprehensive care. 

"A lot of people have mote 




PhgtobyVhMBttaM 

ALL IN ONE. Virginia iteadi'i pvUlc Iwaltli senricei are now locat- 
ed In a oentrallitd place near l>enibrol(e Mall, ivhidi is convenient to 
pabHc bof roirtes. 



than one issue to deal with. Now 
they won't have to go around 
town to various places. 
Hopefully, they can get 
everything they nasd right here. It 
should be more convenient." 

The department celebrated the 
move with an open house and 
ribbon-cutting ceremony just in 
time for National Public Health 
Week, April 6-12. Mayor Mey era 
Oberndorf was on hand to 
present a proclamation honoring 
the observance. 

"Now the department has its 
own identity, its own building," 
she noted. 

Dr. Venita Newby-Owens, 
director, said the move has 
already done much to boost 
morale and teamwork. 

"The consolidation means that 
we have all of our staff in this 
one location, can facilitate 



Handi-ride budget taxing 



Continued From Page 1 

TRT had suggested that some 
reduction in paratransit services 
would be necessary to get within 
its budget, but has since realized 
that reducing the service was 
inappropriate in light of the 
inadequate public notice given. 

Councilwoman Reba McClanan 
noted that once a service is in place 
it's hard to recall 

Councilwoman Louisa 
Strayhom, a member of the TRT 
Commission, said Uiat aU cities are 
doing more than the law mpmes. 
She said here, the di^aiK^e people 
have to travel adds to die cost 

She said the city needs to make 



sure that die people who use die 
service really need it. She said there 
was a great deal of concern when 
Uie regular buses were fitted for 
handicapped access. TRT adapted 
all its buses but now they are not 
being used. She said she has a 
concern about the people who are 
using handi-ride who could use 
buses. 

I^yor Obondorf said that it is 
difficult for even able-bodied peofrfe 
to get to the main lines. 

Councilman John A. Baum said 
that die attitude of the ADA is 
unfortunate. It's do diis with no 
concern for die cost 

Henley saidUie buses have to be 



maintained whether or not they are 
used and that it would be 
interesting to know how many 
people use die adapted buses. 

AJccordingto Castellow's reprat, 
staff and riders have suggested diat 
the program is abused as potential 
riders provide less than accurate 
infomation about dieir capabilities 
to ride other types of services. 
There are stories of allegedly 
legally blind riders calling their 
paratransit drivers back to dieir 
residence so they could search die 
van for dieir car keys. 

In light of the rising costs and 
related problems, die commission 
is considering a recertificadcMi 
pn^ram of users. 



All hail King Neptune! 



Contbiued From Paj^ 1 

XXV and his Royal Court were 
aniKwnced for the firat time Sunday 
'^ during a reception at the Cavalua' 
on die Hill. 

The Royal Court includes 
tritons, princesses and ccwt 
attendants. The Court of Tritoi» 
includes Tom Naughtcm, Wdliffin 
Casanova, George Schaut»ch, Jr., 
Donald L. Brend sid Donald H. 
Patterson Jr. 

The princesses include yiar/ 
Gnce I^ris, lamia Renee Imset, 
Audra Beyers Little, Laam 
Kad»rine PoiiiM}, Joy Lynn Scott 
f^ggy Oii-Pn Ts^ m& Prmc^ 
I^de Si^Mie An Wong. 

The court attendants include 
Kelly Elizabeth Bowe»ett Dav^, 
Susan Paige Fantone I^i»» 
Courtney Taylor St. Clair aid 



King's Page Jesse Walton St. Clair 
IV. 

hi addiuon. William F. 
Roundtree Jr. will serve as 
chairman. John A.B. Davies Jr. 
will be first vice chairman and 
John F. Malbon will be second 
vice chairman wA Triton. 

All the participants werechosm 
on merits of their ccMnmunity 
involvement and support of die 
city. To be chosen as King 
Neptune, a person must also be 
"sold on the community," said 
GimascoU. 

It kx)ks like ht is. 

"The city of Virginia Beach is 
one of the best kq>t secrets for 
living, working and raising a 
family," he said. 

Oianascoli is presi(tent of Gee's 
Group, a real estate devdqxnoit 
company in Virginia Be^h. He 
has served as member of Ae 



Virginia Beach Neptune Festival 
board of directors and executive 
committee for 12 years. He served 
as the Neptune Festival Board 
Chairman from 1993 to 1997. He 
has also served as a member of 
numotius Mho- community boards. 
He is married with two children and 
twopandchikirai. 

Giffiiascoli has lived in Virginia 
Beadi 26 yess and tovra it 

"You have to erne about a city to 
dress like Uiis," he joked, as he 
lodced down at his long flowing 

Ifowevo', Oianascoli faces one 
more challoige in his new rde. 
He must grow a beard to reaOy 
resonbte Ifae mydiotogical god c& 
the) 



"He's never had beard or a 
mustache in 35 yess," said his 
wife, hmti. "b will be inter^^g 

tOSM." 



Send your community news and photos to: 
The Virginia Beach Sun 

RO. Box 1327 
Chesaf^ake, Va, 23327 



communication and do things 
within the building to improve 
services to clients — faster and 
better. It's always better when 
you have everybody in the same 
building, because then you all 
feel more integrated as a team to 
join resources." 

Programs offered at the new 
location arc: 



■ Communicable Disease 
Services; 

■ Dental Clinic for children; 

■ WIC (Women. Children and 
Infants); 

■ Family Health Services, 
including free routine childhood 
immunizations; 

■ Home Visiting and Case 
Management to high-risk 



pregnant women and children; 

■ Healthy Start; 

■ Environmental Health 
Services, including food 
protection, sewer and water, and 
general environmental services; 
and, 

■ Community Services Health 
Promotion; 

■ Vital Statistics Office. 



SPORT UTILITY VEHICLE & TRUCK 



HMH 



OVER 100 IN STOCK! SAVE THOUSANDS COMPARE ANYWHERE! 





ISMMAZIM NAVAJO LX 

6 Cyl.. fcT, A/C. P/S. P/B, P/W. P/DL, 
C/C. Tin, Cass. CD, Sunrool, Alloy 
Wheals. Top o( the Imel Low mileage 
Leather and morel Stk«937B 

*1 3,550 



19M FORD EXPLORER 

6 Cyl . ATT. AC, P/S. PS. P/W, P/DL. OC Tit, 
Cass . Fully Loaded. Aloy Wheels lurtteif. 
Lealher. knoage ndi. lunrwig Oosids. 4 WD. 
Gorgeousl9lc*9338 

»1 4,775 



1997 DODGE RAM ISM 

V-6 A/T A/C P/S. P/B. P/W. P/DL, C/C. Til, 
Cau. BedUner. Anoy Wheelt- aT Inm. only 
13,620 miles, loll 01 wairanty Save Ihousandal 



Sail91t9 



^17,550 




199* ISUZU TROOPERS 

6 Cyl . A/T. »/C, P/S. P/B. P/W. P/IX. C/C. Till, 
Cass , Alloy Whoris Only 30,4(9 miles. 4 WD, 
eoffltwe anywiieni SMUU 

*1 4,500 



1994 FORD F-1 50 

V-8 , A/T. A/C. P/S. P/B, P/W. P/DL. C'C. TlH. 
Cass . BedMar. Aloy Wlwels Flareside. XLT low 
mdeage Haidlolindi Slkl9l21'l 

^11,500 



1994 ISUZtt TROOPER 

6 Cyl . A/C. P/S. P/8. P/W. P/DL, C/C, TiN, 
Cass , Alloy wheels Only 37.59B miles, 
pnced below, wholesalel Sale Phce SI2,950. 
Slk»9221 




1996 LAND ROVER 
DISCOVERY 

v-8, A/C, P/S, P/B, P/W, P/DL, C/C, TlH. Cass . 
AVoy Wheels. Leatier »im, luggage rack, only 
19.712 rnjes Lois ol warranyli 54»7227 

»26,950 




1990 FORD F-156 



A/C. P/S, P/B, C/C, TlH, Cass , AHoy Wheelst 4 
WD. XLT tow mileage Musi see! Sale Pnce 
17700 Slkt9355 (BC) 



*178!I 



6 



1996 FORD EXPLORER 

A/C. P/S. P/B, AM/FM Stereo. AHoy 
Wheels Only 16.580 miles. Lots ol 
bumpertobumper factory warrantyl Sale 
Price $12,950 StktWSS 

2B 




1991 FORD RANfiER 

6 Cyl.. A/T. A/C. P/S, P/B, C/C, TBI. Cass. 
Bedlinar. Alloy Wheels. Super Cab. XLT runs 
great!' Sale Price $3795. Stk#931 1-1 (BC) 

*1202a 



INI TOVOm MlimNER SR6 

6 Cyl . fJC. P/S, P/B, P/W, P/DL, OC. TiH. 
Cass Alloy Wheels 4 WD. only 31,660 
miles, luggage rack, running boards. Save 
thousands! Slk»9344 (P) 

»1 8,775 




1995 FORD BRONCO 

v-8, A/T, A/C. P/S. P/B, PAV. P/DL. C/C. 
THt. Cass . Alloy wheels Only 27.958 mles. 
running boards and morel Compare' 
Slki9153 

^7,500 




1996 JEEP CHEROKEE SE 



5 Spd . A/C. P/S. P/B. Till. Cass . Alloy 
wheels An exceptional value! Why pay 
more' Slk#9382 



^10,925 




1991 FORD EXPLORER 

6 Cyl , A'C, P/S. P/B. PW. P/DL, C/C Tilt, 
Cass . Alloy Wheels 4 WD. XLT, running 
boards, luggage rack. Sale Price$B97S 
Stki9329 (BC) 

«208" 




1995 CHEVROLET 810 

A/C, P/S, P/B, C/C, TiH, Cass, Alloy 
Wheels. LS package. k>w mileage. Sale 
Pnce $8600 Stk»7830 (BC) 

^14911. 




1996 HIRD F-150 



v-e , AiT. A/C. P/S. P/B. P/W. p/oi. cc, n. 

Cass Bedlmer. Aloy Wheels XLT dual M tanks, 
only 27.730 mles. balance ol lacloty warranty' 
Slkni82 



*1 4.525 




1995 JEEP GR-CNERORIE 

6 Cyl, . Art. AC. P/S. P/B. P/W, P/DU. CK. T«. 
Ci9( Aloy WheM Laredo. 4 WO. only 33,«0 
miles, luggage radi ana mora! ^ki%20 

^17,775 



1994 ISUZU RODEO 



« Cyl . A/T. NC. P/5, P/B. P/W. Pm.. OC, C»s , 
Ahy Wheels Luggage radi, a greet vriua on an 
MotdaUe tpa\ uMly iMidei' SkKIW (P) 

^13,500 



1992 FORD RMmfR 



6 Cy(.. A/T. A/C. P/S. PIB, C/C, T*, C<M,, 
Sid, Rear Window, Aloy Wh««ls, 4 WD, 
low mileege, skj^ lilt. Musi »• lo 
Mtel Slit«248. 

*7975 



1993 CHEVY SIOSLAZER 



( Cyl., A/T, A/C, P/S, PS, Pm.M Cass , Aloy 
1Miaels4 WD. ^lhM padisge. luggage ladi 
Coii«a>elMM302(P) 

*10,925 



(■OiuoeiTCEiiTEii mwmmmwn ■cw.ifemMKicTmwwwGMHWTawMwy. 




The Virgin 



i<^ 




h 



VIRGINiA BEACH ^Iv^ and ^.f .'.1' 



'?■ STATE LIB. BFRIPL -' 
flTTNi IRIS rpY( HP 
800 E BROOD or. Z^- 

Richmond ' ir|Y^''-,-!te 



Si/n 




K-9 Kamival 

Virginia Beach Parks and Recreation will 
host the K-9 Kamival at Redwing Park m 
Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. Events iiKlude the 
"Dog-Gonest Dog Show" at 1 p.m. with 
judging categories for best tail w^er, 
owner/dog look-alike, best-behaved for hmidler 
under 16. best-behaved for handler 16 and over, 
best barko'. best stupid pet trick and best in 
show. All dogs are digible to partici|ate. TTic 
21st annual Friskies Alpo Canine Frisbee disc 
Championships begin at 2:30 p.m. Also wijoy 
trained ^g demonstrations, free dog agility 
course, food, infonnation and more throughout 
the day. 



Plant sale 

The Women's Fellowship of the 
Lynnhaven Colony Congregational Church, 
2217 W. Great Neck Rd., will hold a plant 
sale on Saturday, April 25 from 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m. Members will be selling annuals, 
perennials, herbs, hanging baskets and 
vegetable plants. Also, garden art and 
statues will be for sale. A Master Gardener 
will be available to answer questions. Lunch 
will be served. 



Volunteer month 

April is National Volunteer Recognition 
Month. It is also the 20th anniversary of 
Virginia Beach's Volunteer Council. The city 
will host a cemsKmy and ground breaking (rf 
the Volunteer Recognition Quden (hi Satmday 
at 10 a.m., behind City Hall at the Municipal 
CentCT. Join Mayor Mcyera E. Obondorf, city 
officials and staff in honoring the city's 
volunteer. Also in attoidance will be kaden 
who helped begin the Volon^r Council 20 
years ago. Virginia Beach currently has more 
than 10.000 volunteers that have donued more 
than l.S million hours of service at a cost 
savings of mwe than $16.7 million. 




The Planning Commission and the Virginia 
Beach Dcvetopmcnt Authority will hold a joint 
meeting on Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. The purpose 
of this meeting is to discuss current economic 
(tevelopmmtinojects, future need for additkMial 
industrial park property and goals arel 
objectives of the ComjHehensive Plan as they 
relate to economic development. The meeting 
will last apiH-oximately two hours and will be 
held in the offices of the Department of 
Economic Development, One Columbus 
Center, Suite 300, Virginia Beach. For furthw 
information, contact Karen Ueley. 426-4621. 



Golf tournament 

The Hampton Roads 
Chapter of The R^ired 
Officers Association will 
sponsor a Florida Best 
Ball Spring Golf 
Tournament at the Ocean 
Aeropines Course oi 
Monday, May 4. Regisra- 
tion, breakfast and Mulligan sales begin at 
6:45 a.m. in the picnic shelter with a shotgun 
start at 7:15 8.m. All profits go lowad 
a;holardiii» fat k)cal high school ^udents. 

This yeffl-,p^cq»tion has been e;q»ndedto 
include TROA ch^ter members, those eligibte 
for membership, spouses and widows of the 
foregoing and one g>»st per chapter member. 
Cost is $38 per player includes greeais fee. cart, 
breakfast, lunch, favws andinizes. Entry fomis 
must be recdvedno later than Mcrnday. April 
27. For further golf information call, 481- 
2559. For TROA membership infoim^ion 
call, 481-1054. 



Seatack celebrates 

It's the first anniversary of Seatack 
Community Recreation Center's Chand 
Caning andyoo aieoxdially invited to attend 
tte celeta^m on Sttoday frcxn 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m. Look for lots of ffunily fun, widi great 
food, live mtertainmoit and demonstrati(xis in 
karate and boxing throughout the di^. 
Admission is free. Fc^ mcse informatim call, 
4374858, TDD 471-5839. 



Wildlife helpers 

In tl» raimal worid, q»ii^ is tet^ souon. 
In urban mtaa, sping alio mMns lots of 

injw»l ui4^ Ofl^MMd M)y MtacU. If ytm 
think you would enjoy playing a role in 
hc^g theie niffl^ r»^ve the ewe ttey Med 
until they can be re^N^ Hck intt Mr 
haUtat, yon Aodd aMeda wMlttevAnav 
tnuBiag m^ ttthe VkgaiMi B«ch SPCA. 
Them^VwiUbetekliMSimk^Ml p.a. 




U^o. 14 3SC«ills 



school can go ahead as planned 



By Leo Cahlll 

CitYCqvn<rflflgpgfl9r 

City Council heeded the pleas of 
officials and patrons of the W.T. Cociat 
Elementary School, the city's dd^ 
school, and deleted a use pomit condition 
that would have required the planned new 
building to be moved back 20 feet to 
accommodate a neighboring church. 

Under consic^atioi by council Tuesday 
was an application for a use permit to 
close a portion of 15th Street from 
Mediterranean Avenue and running east 
325 feet. TTie part of the street that would 
be closed contains 16,250 square feet 

The school site does not meet the stale 
requirements for an elementary school, 
and state approval of the recoistmcted 
school hing^ on the school's acquiring 
the portion of 15th Street which divides 
tlw school site in half. A gate closes die 
street at Mediterranean anyway, said John 
Newhart, assistant city attoroey who 
serves as ScIkx)! Board atttvney. 

Newhart said that the church, the 
Pentecostal Church of Christ, had 
approached the School Board to purchase 
its property so that it could locate 
el^whoe, but that plan did not woik 
out The School Boaod did purchase two 



Council 
weighs 
tax relief 
programs 

By Lee Cahlll 

CitvCoundlRfloortflf 

Some of the oldercilizens in Virginia 
Beach fmd themselves house rich and 
income poor as a result of increasing real 
estate assessments. 

While their houses may be worth more 
than ever, their incomes are static or 
lower than they were in the past. The 
higher real estate taxes charged on their 
more valuable homes put a drain (mi their 
resources making it difficult for them to 
remain in their homes where some have 
lived for a good part of their lives. 

Over the years, the city has tried to 
help these citizens remain in their homes 
by offering tax relief for the elderly, a 
program extended to the disabled as well 
where citizens who meet certain critoia 
are offered tax relief. 

One of the criteria is a cap of $22,000 
on in(X)me. Some council members have 
asked whether that cap can be raised to 
$25,000 so that more people can lake 
advantage of the ptjgram. 

If the threshold were increased to 
$25,000. E. Dean Block, director of 
management and budget, told council at a 
budget work session Tuesday it would 
cost Uw city from $260,000 to $400,000 
in tl» first year — currently $1 .626,000 
is currently ai^ropriated for the 1998-99 
tax relief budget 

Councilwoman Louisa Strayhorn said 
that with the city considering 
referendums for schools and libraries, the 
people over 65 would like to sec some 
balaiKx. TtKy are not against schools and 
lih-aries but would see taxes, which 
already have gone up beyond 
aff(»dability, go up further. 

Sm COUNai, Pag« 5 



duplexes soudi of 15th Street and plans 
to locate 25 parking spaces there which 
could be used by the church when the 
school was not using them. 

Newhart said the schools agreed to 
relocate the dumpsicr pad southwest of 
its current site so that it would not be 
visible from the front of the church, 
agreed to add a sidewalk on 14th Street, 
agreed to expand a cul-de-sac on 15th 
Street to allow for a standard turnaround. 
But he said the shifting of the building 
20 fe«t to allow for a 25-fooi buffer 
would create a problem. 

Tony Arnold, engineer for the School 
Board, said that the school system has 
made a;commodations for the church but 
diat shifting the building would require a 
redesign of the building putting the 
schools two to three months behind 
schedule. 

He said design of the school is 95 
percent complete, bids are expected to go 
out in June, and die completion date is 
set for January 2000. 

The students will be relocated in the 
existing Linkhom Park School during 
die construction. He said that the change 
would add 1,800 feet to Uie project atid 
increase the cost. The other Uiree accom- 
modations, he said, show that we're 
uying to be a good neighbor. The school 



has been there since aboui 1906, he said. 

Diane Gilllespie, president of the 
Shadow Lawn PTA said that moving the 
building would be a great hardship She 
said it wouldn't provide a better project 
She said the church is practically on the 
property line and delineates its prqwiy 
with a chain link fence and has not 
planted anything. She said there is 
plenty of room on the church and school 
sides for screening with the pre^nt 
plans. 

As for parking — the church has leed 
15th Street for parking — she said she 
noticed "abounding" parking on Easter 
Sunday. She said the parking lot acn^s 
from the church will more than offset the 
parking on 15th Stfcet 

She said she knew the planning 
commission was trying to malK 
everyone happy and said that the church 
had said it wanted 29 acres from die city 
for a new church or did not want the 
school built. She said the church also 
wanted die replacement coSL 

Craig Davis, who has taught at die 
school for 20 years, said it was time "our 
school had a face lift." He said he enjoyed 
the new gym built on die north side of 
I5th Street but it's time the classroom 
part had somediing new. 

Greg Anderson, school principal, sakl 



the church has been a waadaM 
neighbor, but die school already has die 
smallest campus in the city and a small 
lot has its drawt»cks. If the school is 
moved 20 feel it will be closer to a busy 
street. 

Changing at this late hour, he said, 
when the peq)le are so excited, would be 
a oagedy. 

Desi Allen, pastor of die church, saki 
he wanted to see Cooke built but does 
not want to see his church ruii^in die 
process He said the major issue is that 
the route leading to die church will be 
cut off and the visibility of the church 
will be cut off from Mediterranean. He 
said the remaining 15th Street will 
become a losing and unloading zone, 
and as for the parking, churches don't 
just do business on Sundays. 

GrowUi of die church will be hindered, 
he said, and "If the project hinders our 
building, somebody will be liable here." 
Beach Borough councilman Lmwood 
Branch said that it looted like a net ^ 
in parking slices to him, and that die 
school project has been embraced with 
enthusiasm. 

Council voted unanimously to 
approved the street closure with die 
omission of the condition that wouki 
require shifting die building. 



SEAL takes ultimate challenge 
for cerebral palsy fund-raiser 

Beach man is 
tad<ling Beast ~ 
of the East solo 

By Victoria Hecht 

Editor 

Andy Scott is used to putting his 
body to the test 

As a 10-year veteran active duty 
Navy SEAL, the Virginia Beach man 
has made a career of pushing himself 
to the physical limits. 

But the ultimate challenge will 
come this summer when Scott 
participates in his fu-st Beast of the 
East competition. 

The intense five-day trek dirough 
the Allegheny Mountains of Virginia 
will challenge competitors widi the 
most extreme mental and physical 
conditions — biking, hiking and 
canoeing non-stop for 300 miles. 

Most people take die challenge in 
teams of dvee. Scott is going it alone. 

Well, almost Widi him die Chick's 
Beach resident will have the 
motivation of his oldest child, 16- 
year-old Derek, who has cerebral 
palsy. 

Scott, 34, is undertaking Beast of 
the East to benefit United Cerebral 
Palsy (UCP) of Southeastern 
Virginia. His goal is $30,000. 

Matching the non-profit 
organization and natural 
competitiveness was a perfect fit fiw 
Scott. 

"I wanted to do an adventure race 
and have always been very athletic. 
Usually, I excel in Uiese types of 
events," he explained. 

Sm seal. Rags 5 




BEAST OF THE EAST. Vlfflnia BeKk resideat Andy Scott is frnpiringfor a 
gnwNng flye-dsy, SOO-miie noA-stof trek tiirovgli the AHeghmy MMqtains. 
To traM for the event be often does 24-liour training sessions, such as a 
anrathon, flawed by a 3(Nirite ran and then 30 nMa ^ ktyak. m is 
coajNUng In Beast of the East to raise $3M00 for United Cerebral Msy of 
SMtlmaterfl Vli^nia. 



Jaycees mark 50 years of service to others 




Gala dinner, golf tourney planned 



LpOWW lACK. M witiri tl tl» vlfiMi iMdi Jiycm in rntmt^ » at- 
^yiaffi al Mnlee la oie • 



By ItargarM WlrnfMy 

Corr9spon« ; tent 

In 1948, Virginia Beach n^ded a 
hospital, ttscne squad uid litxiu^. Thtt 
was al^ die y^ir diat die Viifinia Beadi 
Jiyc»» was bcxn. 

¥ox the next SO yes^ the orgwbaiiMi 
becMie actively oif^ed in rectifying die 
situation Md kxricing for new areas <^ 
s«vfce. 

A committw of past and pres£M 
presi<tents and life members of die 
Virginia B<ach Jay«^s and Jtycems (die 
fcmafccouBtaiMrt until 1984) have been 
^herii^ at die Jayce^olTice in Ifotlaid 
Offk%Puk sai« Jui« to make die plans 
for the wgMiiMtJwi's 50th annivasary 
\i^ diis mmA. 

Tl^ iriiM Mt mny. 



Past and pvsent members and dieir 
guests will have an oj^xinunity to be 
swing dwir cluls during an mmivet^ 
golf tournament at Honeybee (kM 
CouTK on April 25 widi an Bmi^^^raiy 
dinner forty M 6:30 p.m. that evening « 
Pavilion Towers. The dinner's pn^tm 
will be presented by attending pm 
iwcsidents who will each be allowed one 
minute a pi»:e to tell the Mhers dwM 
the activiti^ ot ihdr y^. 
Tl^y will have ^my lo tift itouL 
T^x last fi^deadeiNiw been busy 
ones for die Virginia B^ch JiKjfmm m 
diey have beccmie Ktively e^^^ in a 
number of civic [MO^ti iwk^ig te 
^Uishmeat of Vi^inia B^chGa»il, 



1 



^^i^i 



^gm^m 



m 



2 Virginia Baeh Sun. Frictay, April 17, 1998 



Commentary 




BE SIND TO MOTHER EARTH 

Environmentalism times 3 

'The Earth does not belong to man. Man 
beloT^s to the Earth. Man did not weave the 
web of life. He is merely a strand in it. 
Whatever he does to the web, he does to 
himself 

Chief Seattle 

Twenty-eight years ago, Wisconsin Sen. 
Gaylord Nelson proposed an idea that many 
people of his generation thought was off kilter 
— a day set aside to honor Mother Earth. 

Who would have 
thought two decades 
ago that Earth Day 
would evolve to the 
acclaimed status that 
it enjoys in 1998? But 
soon after the first 
recognition of Earth 
Day on April 22. 1970, 
two momentous 
occasions were cele- 
brated by environmental activists — the 
passage of the Clean Water Act and the 
creation of the Environmental Protection 
Agency. 

In 1998, Americans have three reasons to 
celebrate Mother Earth. And they're all 
within one week: Earth Day. April 22; Arbor 
Day. April 24; and Historic Garden Week, 
April 18-25. 

Because environmental awareness is still a 
relatively young movement, it requires the 
support of every man, woman and child on 
this planet. If you are doing your part to 
preserve the Earth for future generations, 
congratulations. If you aren't, you should be. 
No one is saying you have to launch a one- 
person war to save the planet. But if everyone 
were to pitch in with their small part, think of 
the possibilities. 

The easiest way to do your part is to 
practice the "3 R's" of environmentalism each 
day: 

■ Reduce — This one is easy dnd requires 
the least amount of work. When shopping at 
the store, consciously choose products with 
the least amount of packaging. Why take 
home several plastic bags when all purchases 
fit easily Into a canvas tote? Reducing waste 
output Is the key. 

■ Reuse — This one requires a little more 
work. It means saving plastic bags. If you use 
them, and giving them new purposes. Line 
waste containers with them or give them back 
to the supermarket to reuse. 

■ Recycle ^- This requires the most effort, 
but the paybacks are spiritually and 
financially rewarding. In Hampton Roads, 
where curbslde recycling Is encouraged by 
SPSA, there is no excuse not to. 

In one day alone, for example. 1.5 million 
pounds of consumer-related aluminum Is 
recycled by Reynolds Aluminum. This is the 
equivalent to more than 1.470 average-sized 
garbage truckloads of aluminum being 
diverted from landfill waste. 

There are ways to maximize a good impact, 
too. In honor of Arbor Day, why not plant a 
tree? To help celebrate Historic Garden 
Week, participate In a roadside clean-up 
program or start an Adopt- A- Highway project 
in your neighborhood. 

On Earth Day, do take the time to smell the 
roses — literally. Take a hike through one of 
our area's many regional parks, take part in 
Earth Day festivities at Mount Trashmore and 
consciously observe nature's glory around 
you. 

Take the opportunity to look, listen, smell 
and feel. You might Just get a sensory 
overload! — V.E.H. 



HOW TO SUBSCRIBE TO 
THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 



n New Subscription Q Renewal 

Please mail this cou|X)n with your d%d( to: 

SUN, 138 S. Rosemont Rd., Vliginia Beach, VA 23452 

RATES: WKhln 40 miles of Virginia Beach: 

□ One year $15.95 Q Two years $28.95 

Elsewhere In Virginia and North Carolina: 

Q One year $17.85 \3 Two years $29.50 

All other stales: 

Q One year $24.00 [11 Two years $38.50 
Name 



Axk^m. 



aty 

,SWe ap___ __j 




Protect Virginia kids from tobacco 



By Scott Bates 

Wfien I served as Virginia's 
secretary of the commonwealth, 
one of my titles was "Protector of 
the Great Seal." I was in charge of 
making sure that the symbol Of 
Virginia was respected. 

When you take a look at the 
Great Seal, the symbol of our 
state, you will find tobacco leaves 
prominently displayed. That is how 
much a part of Virginia's heritage 
the leaf has been. 

Tobacco cultivation paved the 
way for the settlement of Virginia. 
For centuries Virginia has 
prospered from the farming and 
production of tobacco. For 
generations, tobacco has been part 
of the heritage and identity of our 
land. But change is on the way. 

Wc have learned over time that 
tobsK^co use can cause addiction and 
damage health. Advocates of 
tobacco will quickly point out that 
the same can be said of alcohol, 
and prohibition in that case did not 
work. Prohibition in the case of 
tobacco will not work either. All 
prdiably true. 

But we have learned a few 
lessons from the use of alcohol 
that can be affiled to tobacco, and 
Virginia needs to begin the 
sensible regulation of tobacco just 
as it has with alcohol. 

Alcohol is bad for kids. So is 
tobacco. It's just that simple. 

Here's the long explanation. 
Alcohol and tobacco can be habit 
forming and addictive. That's bad 
news when it happens because a 
physical dependency develops that 
harms health and in many instances 
can lead to premature death. 

In the case of those who ae 
addicted to tobacco, f»'emature death 
is painful and harsh. Lung cancer, 
throat cancer and heart failure are 
some of the fates that await today's 
children that are becoming addicted 
to tobacco as we speak. 

Adults can make up their own 
minds about alcohol and tobacco. 



Eighteen is the legal age for 
adulthood for a lot of reasons. We 
will not allow children to vote 
because they do not have the 
maturity or experience to make a 
binding decision on our 
governance. 

We will not send children off to 
war because it is not mcn-al to put 
them in harm's way before they 
have had a chance to live. 

We do not allow children to 
purchase alcohol because we know 
that they do not have the maturity 
to make an informed decision on 
using this drug. We do not allow 
children to buy tobacco products 
for the same reasons. 



Alcohol is bad for 
kids. So is tobacco. 
It's just that 
simple. 



The only problem is that 
Virginia is not serious about 
enforcing the laws that protect 
children against tobacco. It's time 
for us to get tough. 

Former Gov. George Allen 
assembled a task force on tobacco 
with the mission of reporting to 
the General Assembly ways in 
which to deal with this difficult 
issue. The results are in and now 
Gilmore should accept the advice of 
the Allen panel. 

The task force recommends that 
the Virginia Alcohol Bevoage 
Control Board be given the 
authority and resources to enfcHce 
the laws which make tol^cco sales 
to children illegal. Theirs is a 
modest proposal, increasing the 
number of agents available to 
V ABC by 32 and dedicating their 
time to the enforcement of the law. 

The cost is $5 million, which 
really is a small price to pay to 



enforce the I%w and protect our 
children. 

There is another more practical 
reason why Virginia needs to start 
enforcing the law. Federal health 
care funds are tied to the 
commonwealth achieving higher 
compliance rates. In September, 
undercover agents were successful 
in making illegal tobacco purchase 
17 percent of the time. 

Under the proposed fed^ 
tobacco settlement, that rate must 
come down to 10 percent in cnfcr 
for Virginia to get its fair share of 
tobacco settlement money that is 
devoted to health care. So our 
choice is clear — enforce the law 
or lose health care money. 

The task force developed a soies 
of proposals that should all be 
acted on by the govenun- and signed 
into law within the next month. 
The task force wants to outlaw 
cigarette vending machines excqn 
in places where no one younger 
than 18 can enter. Photo ID's 
should be required of anycme 
younger than 27 who purchase 
cigarettes so that there is no room 
fbroTor. 

We should also lower the 
standard under which vendors can 
be {nosecuted for selling cigarettes 
to minors. 

Virginia should also consido' 
licensing cigarette vendors much as 
we license those who sell alcohol. 
By taking these simple steps we 
will begin to make real progress in 
taking tobacco away from our 
children and concentrating on the 
well being of those Virginians who 
grow and produce tobacco. 

We ne&d to protect the kids and 
make sure that hard working 
Virginians are not punished for 
practicing the profession of their 
fathers. 



Note: Scott Bates is a former 
Virginia Secretary of State. He 
comments weekly on- state 
politics. 



'Cleaning up' at tax man tim^ 




The tax man cometh, and the tax 
man taketh away. 

When you read this the magic day 

— April 15 — will ahieady have 

flown, leaving we last-minute filers 

to wait until 

June for our 

refund. 

That is, if 
we get a re- 
fund. 

When 
Evan came 
home par- 
ticularly 
grumpy one 
day last 
we«k, I had 
only to kxk 
at the calen- 
dar and un- 
derstand 
why. It was 
^^^^^^^^ tiroetodothe 
taxes. He'd 
held off long 
enough. 

Barely spcakinga w(^, he giaU>^ 
a sandwich and glass of miUc and 
cloistered himself in the teck room. 
With the Turtx) Tax {sogr»n to assiA 
him, Evan set about (tetermining 
whether the IRS wcNild be our frioid 
or foe this year. 

S^y, it will be a little of both. Tl» 
good thing is that his busn^s is 
booning, which n«ans i^eaia m- 
cone tat die H»te bomeMd. The 
1^ diing is diat a good m^flK Burices 
{(s &\mi tttmi. 
WeU. if %« gM a r^B^ M idL 
AcccH#q 10 ny ^^nd's ^- 
nsMes. we wiB f^tpMdioid (rf$27 
back Cram Ae gooerawit itm year 
— not even mM^ f» (Hnwr M • 



Off The 
Cuff 

By Victoria 
Hecht, editor 



nice restaurant 

At least the tax mm won't taketh 
away this year. 

Well, I lake that tack. Propwty 
taxes on vehicles and office equip- 
ment will be due soon, promising to 
take a healthy bite. 

Sure wish Gov. Jim Gilmore's war 
cry of "No car tax!" would kick in 

soon. 

***** 

Nothing brings out the urge to tend 
house like a jwetty spring day. 

The sun is shining, the windows 
are thrown open and a slight sweat 
breaks on the brow as one sets about 
doing spring cleaning. 

I normally ta;kle the job the day 
before Easttf. S«ne might call it 
procrastination, but I think the house 
should be at its very cleats before 
Easter comimiy arrives the next day. 

You never know when soneone 
will do the white glove dust te^ 

So Satioday as the birds chirped 
me awake I thought ab(wt the myriad 
of tasks before me th« day, cvoy- 
thing from scruM)ingtbeldtdiai fkxsr 
VQ dusting tasdx»ids ami electing 
^ms ditt. weik only get cl^n^l once 
a ytss. (Mom, always the tkly hotse- 
iBsspa, nooM be \^y ^MppcmWdt 
int!».) 

Howevo', widi a^istuKS frnn 
Hekrise, An^ca's n^nid ^Aless 
(tfhel|rfUhaM,Itaiiedafiewai»d^ 
iq» to ffilstanaig withoM slav^ 

The fim is tokeq; d« lights km, 
di»i^ «m@dmg te dust diat lurks 
in cisds and crevk^. I try to wipe 
down die IvfB, flat snte^ teK g^ 
lott id tooUig l^ viflion. 

Tte sectxid is ftr die iMue tt}so^ 
ckM. Hk kta tt 10 cn^e Okinm. 
Jiw bef(» (oeM Mriw ^say ak 



fresheno', light some scented candles 
and maybe even run furniture poUsh 
over a few pieces. The nose tells 
guests the house is s|ning-fresh. 

A third trick is to go through die 
house with a laundry basket and pick 
up all diose loose odds and ends dtat 
get out of place. Then stash die basket 
in a closet where no one will see it 

The final trip is my favorite, one I 
practice religiously. 

Because a tmst^s need only give 
die impressive of an immaculate 
house, tfiere's no reason for guests to 
see ev»y room. I call it OTganized 
disorder. 

By keeping visitors limited to only 
a few nxmis — den, kitchen, dining/ 
living room and one tathroom — 
there's no reason why the rest of die 
home can't be in utttr chaos. 

Of c»urse, dial's not taking into 
accaintson)epeq)]e,likemyl»od^^, 
1^ dsolttldy, positively have to 
SM every nwm. Clc^g tlM; (kxvs to 
shxiies, extra btfhroons, bedro(xns 
ami Iffliffiby roans is normally enough 
to dis(^)iB3ge Ae average visitor, but 
(»iev«^musthavea"look ws>" n«!ds 
strong tvging to keq) out. 

iRMinaiely, my Easter entertain- 
ing went off well. No om ex<%p my 
nK»n, who Iub seen my becfaoom in 
dismay nuuiy times, knew diat die 
off-limits rooms were a disaster. 

W^. I Ms dial tack. My loving 
bn^CT VicMr ^1 (as oUbr bioth^ 
se oiyht 10 do) loves lo embvn^ 
me. Sinlay he didn't A simpbpfoc- 
Iw^tottttit^osh, yourbedrocxn 
mm te meai^ wm enoo^ to tave 
evo^ne nwtf^ a pe^ 

Tl^'s OK. I'll get taMidt at him CNK! 
(taqr — n^xn^ wins aw good tt 




The Real 
World 

By B.J. Ses- 
siona, senior col- 
umnist. 



Memory doesn't fail 

It's inter^ting how you can be 
awareofan ev»it diat hqjpened many 
yeai^ ago and had thoughtabout from 
time to time and dien read about it in 
a magazine 
diathasadif- 
ferent ver- 
sion than die 
one you re- 
member. My 
knowledge 
of die event 
is firsthand 
compared to 
an article I 
read writtoi 
Ity Francis A. 
O'Brien fw 
World War 
II, a maga- 
zine to which 
I subscribe. 
— ~— — ^— " In the ar- 

ticle O'Brien 
writes about 
die Battle of Saipan and his uncle, U. 
Col. William O'Brien, an Army of- 
ficer with the 27di Infantry Division. 
He was awarded the Medal of Wsmx 
posdiumously. It would have been a 
beautiful story if O'Brien had stopped 
diere, but he chose while honoring 
his uncle to denigrate die honw of 
one of the most colorful and best- 
loved heroes in America's war widi 
Japan. 

His name is Holland M. "HowUn 
Mad" Smidi, Unit^ States Marine 
Corps. In 1944,theMarinesand Army 
were assigned die t|isk of taking 
Saipan. In short, die 27th Army In- 
fantry Division lOSdiand lO&h Regi- 
ments were under die command of 
Major Gen. Ralph C. Smith. Overall 
command of the amphibious landing 
was the responsibility of Marine Lt. 
General Holland M. Smith. 

The unfortunate part of all this is 
diat die Army was just not trained as 
well for amphibious warfare as die 
Marines. There was trouble from die 
start. They just couldn't pull dieir 
load. This was later admitted to by 
Army General Smidi himself and 
some of his own officers. 

Marine General Smidi became so 
concerned Uiat he discussed it with 
the commander of die Fifdi Fleet, 
Vice Admiral Raymond Spromice, 
who audiorizo] and dirKted Marine 
General Smidi to relieve Major Gen- 
eral Ralph M. Srfiith from command 
of die 27di Division. Robert Shenod 
in die SepL 1 8, 1944 edition of Time 
magazine claimed diat dw 27th Divi- 
sion had frozen in their foxhoksnidisr 
than attack the enemy at Saipan. 

According to Sherrod, Army Gen- 
eral Ralph Smidi tad condoned dieir 
cowardly conduct 

I'm sure diat I^ancis O'Brim db- 
tained die material forhis article frcMn 
die 27di Division HisKuian and odier 
sources favorable to die 27th Divi- 
sion. 

I obtained my infcMmationdirecdy 
from die moudis of monbos of die 
27di Division when diey returned to 
Espiriui Santo after dwy were re- 
lieved from Saipan. They were 
ashamed, confused, frightened and 
tired. 

In referring to diis officer's con- 
duct at Saipan he said, "Frankly, die 
man appeared to be muddled." In his 
article O'Brien criticized Marine 
General f 'Howlin Mad") SmiUi, bitt 
bodi die Army and Marines know 
what happened at Saipan andO'Brim 
can't change diat 
_, Welcome to die real world. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

P.O. Box 1327 
1024 North Battleflcid Blvd. 

Chesapeake, Va. 23320 

Telephoae: (757) 547-4571 

(USPS660-140) 

PubHshcr 
Hanes Byerly 

General Manager 

RonWilmot 

EdltkM-al Snpcnrlaar 
Jamie Brown 

Editor 

Victcria Hecht 

Bustncn Maaager 

UighWnd 

ConpodtloB 
LoretuLomix 

The Virgjnia Beac^ Son ii ptd>- 
liih^ eveiy Friday by Byerly PubUn- 
tions. Inc., 1000 Armory Drive, 
Franklin. Virginia 23831. Pokdkab 
postage paid in Irmklin, Vir^nia ami 
additwnal enffy officet. Poitmaam: 
Saidaddbessdumgetio lOOOAnnocy 
Drive, ftvddm, Virginia 23831. Sri>- 
tcriptiim Rat^: By mail addr^Mt 
within 40 miles of Virginia Beach, 
Va.. one year, $15.95, two yran, 
$28.95. Virginia md Nisth Carobia, 
cmt year, $17.83, two yeaa, $29J0. 
h^ other stalei cme yeK. $24,00, two 
yem. tMSi. PqraUe ki advnn. 

O^xm Byo-fy PuUicakHM nevra* 
{Mp»(: llie Cheupedce P«»t, The 
P«timouth Time$, The Tidewats 
Newt, Tte BnMwick Tiin»-Oa^^ 
The ladep^dent M^iw^w, Th« 
Uiwid^ Mnuicr. Hw fmit^mt 
ttaiilsr. 



IHHI 



Virginia Beach Sun, Friday, Ai»il 17, 1998 3 



Community Color Project 
brightening landscape 




The 

Mayor's 

Report 

Maya- Meyera 
Obemdorf 



I would like to report to our citi- 
zens abouta new pilot prognun which 
has been initiated to enhance road- 
way aesthetics in our city. This new 
initiative 
called the 
"Community 
Color 
Projojt" has 
resulted in 
signiHcantly 
enhanced 
landscape 
ueadnentfOT 
twolocatk»is 
on Princess 
Anne Road 
and a part of 
Northmnpton 
Boulevard. 

Members 
of a Virginia 
Beach Beau- 
tification 
Commission 
subcommit- 
tee conducteda 
com{Hehensive review of city aes- 
thetics, funding for appearance-re- 
lated programs, and related ordi- 
nances to determine where commu- 
nity aesthetics might be enhanced. 
The monbers interviews key city 
staff, whose responsibilities include 
aesthetic programs and issues, such 
as the director of plpning, director 
of public works, landscape services 
administrator, city arborist, parks and 
recreation facilities planner and odi- 
ers. 

While I understand there was a 
general consensus among the sub- 
committee members that much has 
bera accomplished in theaiea of C(Mn- 
munity aesthetics, it was felt diat the 
appearance of thecity's busiest roal- 
ways could be enhanced With mctfe 
intensive landscaping. Our city does 
and has for a number of years in- 
cluded in its Capital Improvement 
Program speci& funding for land- 
scaping for major roadway corridors 
which has insured that all major road- 
ways throughout the city are land- 
scaped afto' completion. 

More recently, we have designated 
to major roadways as privities in 
terms of a higher level of landscape 
treatment; Independence Boulevsurd 
from Jeanne Street to Pembroke Bou- 
levard and MiUtary Highway firom 
Chesapeake city limiu to the Norfolk 



This mtne intensive huidscqnng 
has {XDvided screening and bofSmng 
to reduce the mpta. of diese ex- 
pmcted roulway ccHridos on adja- 
cottneighbothoods. In addition, more 
interest, variety and seasonal cokH- is 



provided with both landscape 

liie Virginia Beach BeauliAil Com- 
mission subcommittee, with the as- 
sistance of city staff, developed sev- 
eral landscape design concepts and 
their costs. The subcommittee then 
selected a number of candidate rx>ad- 
ways throughout the city fw an en- 
hanced level of landsciqje treatment. 
City Council was then asked and 
agreedtofiindSlOO.OOO in the Capi- 
tal Improvement Program for this 
pilot program. 

The project locations selected were 
on Princess Anne Road from 
Newtown Road to Comancte Road, 
Princess Anne Road at L^kspur 
Middle School and Northampton 
Boulevard from Wesleyan Drive to 
Diamond Springs Road for well over 
a mile of enhanced landscaped road- 
ways. After additional input from Uie 
subcommittee membo^, the Land- 
sc^ie Services Division fmalized the 
landscaped design plans for the 
project areas and arranged for instal- 
lation of the plant materials. 

The designs included plant materi- 
als that will provide interest, variety 
and color over 1 2 months and are low 
maintenance and drought tolerant. I 
would in viteourcitizens to drive past 
these pro^t areas which are espe- 
cially colorful at this time. The project 
locations are identified with "Com- 
munity Color Project" signs. 

In Edition to the Landscape Ser- 
vices staff assistance for die actual 
planting on Princess Anne Road 
project site, I am pleased to note that 
assistance was provided by Mr. I^t 
Bridges, president of the Virginia 
Beach Beautification Commission, 
Admiral Tom Ward, Chairman of the 
Commission's aesthetic subcommit- 
tee, Mrs. John Miller, the 
Commission's Arbor Day Chairper- 
son, as well as Council Lady Nancy 
K. Parker, and 1 would like to thank 
them for their enthusiasm and dedi- 
cation. 

Because of the success of this pilot 
project, I and the City Council have 
agreed to consider an additional 
$100,000 for next year's Capital Im- 
provement Program. We value the 
pstneiship and close wmking rela- 
tionship that was qqsarent during the 
development of this pilot jHogram 
and we kx)k forward to the Virginia 
Beach Beautification Commission 
members again working with ihe city 
staff in selecting other roadway 
project areas for new landscape 
plantings next fall. 

Edward S. Barnes, city landscape 
services administrator, contributed 
to this column. 



Unsung heroes are recognized 
during Telecommunicators Weeic 



The week of April 12-18 has 
been designated as "National 
TdeconunimkattHs' Week." 

It honors telecommunicatcns, 
dispatches and call-takers who 
w(h1c for law enforcement, fire, 
emergency medical service 
providers, forestry andccmsovation 
in local, state and federal agoicks 
for their dediouim and courage in 
performing one of the most 
important jobs in society; the vital 
link between the public in crisis 
and the agencies which provide 
help. 

Telecommunications work skie 
by side with other public safety 
personnel protecting the lives ad 
property of die citizens they serve. 
They often work long, h^ hours 
under extremely stressful 
conditions. Although rarely 
recognize because they are not 
physically present at the scoie, 
tebcommunicators are our nations 
unsung hooes. 



The Virginia Beach Police 
Communications Division is 
noting this week by hosting the 
11th annual Tidewater 
Telecommunicators Banquet at the 
Virginia Beach Resort Hotel and 
Conference Center, 2800 Shore Dr. 
The event is attended by disfMlchers 
and telecommunicators from cities 
and counties throughout the 
Hampton Roads area and 
di^jaicters from the local military 
ba»s. (Alleges and universities. 

Thm: will also be an (^n house 
at the Virginia Beach Police 
Dqartrnwit's Communications 
Division on Friday from 9 a.m. to 
3 p.m. The public and city 
employees can observe the 
communications service provided 
by the communications offices. 
The division is located on the 
gnrand floor of the Virginia Beach 
Police HndquiBtas building at the 
Municipal Center, 2509 Mbcc$s 
AiuieRd. 



11 Beach programs showcased 
In statewide school guide 



The Virginia School Bead 
A^^ocatkm (VSBA) recoKly 
publish^ its 1998 Showcases fir 
Success, an annual directcxy listing 
successful K-12 school prc^iams 
in Viiginia's publk scltools. This 
ynr. Vir^ia BeiKh Khools hsi 
11 im^rams Reeled for iiKlusim 
in the (Um^ofy. each r^xes^ting a 
"best prKtk^" scmario at die 
sctooL 

Of the mote than 90 pn^;cuM 
submitt^ to VSBA and the 82 
ultimately chosen fcM' mclasion in 
the ^blic^M, Virginia Bexii 
selwols' pn^ams r^^^^t 13.5 
percent (rf the total. Eniries n^e 
from a descriptkui of a worts 
exp^fence program at Larioper 
Kfiddk Sctacri to n ookknr ^Aft 
proj^t at Kenpsville I^ 



School, and to a study of 
"Looping" (following students* 
progress through several grades, 
monitoring successes ami 
interviewing when n&:essary) in 
grad^ 1 and 2 at Mnce^ AniK 
Honemry Sctool. 

VSBA Ex^utive DirK;tor Rmk 
Bmfasn OKmsees distribution of die 
puUkatkm to each school distria's 
school board members, 
superintmdKit and media coMcts 
and to suie ofBcials, nctobig 
legislator, the State Boan] of 
Education, the State 
Si)pain^itaM.Gov. Jim Gilimxe 
and the S^:reiary of Gdintion. 
Bwhnn (taKiib^ the ^ignm as 
"iffn^um ifaowcam for Ae 
ysiod ttiags h^qjMmg in puUii 
eAxMion.'* 



Up close and personal 

'David Sdnw-ns: lending a way of lift 



By Victoria HecM 

E<fitor 

Virginia Beach's Man of the Year in 
Agriculture was raised in Creeds just a 
Stone's throw from the place that he now 
calls home. David Salmons not only tends 
the land, but is carrying on a family 
tradition of farming that goes back for 
generations. 

"My dad was a farmer, my grandfather 
was a fanner, my great-grandfather was a 
farmer — they say as far back as the 1600s 
we were farming. My ancestors came across 
from England and settled about three miles 
from here. It's all I've ever known, never 
had a job other than farming," he said. 

Salmons' three brothers and his father all 
make a living from agriculture-related 
enterprises and live within miles of each 
other. 

"When I was in high school, and even 
before Uiat, we all worked with Dad helping 
him out. We even had a little/partnership 
going back dien, until we all branched out 
and went out on our own," he explained. 

One brother brokers grain, another does 
custom fertilizer and seed, and third works 
closely with their father, Howard. Salmons 
raises 11,000 to 12,000 hogs per year in 
Virginia Beach and grows about 600 acres 
of wheat, com and soybeans in Chesapeake. 
"Dad has always been into row crop 
farming — it was and still is his main 
enterprise. As we boys got to the age where 
we would be going off to college or work, 
we knew there wouldn't be enough land to 
go around for all of us. So we got into the 
hog business," Salmons said. 

"That's the partnership 1 was talking about 
before. When I came back from college 
(N.C. State), die partnership started to split 
up. It eventually wound up that I was the 
only one in the hog business. I've been in it 
ever since." 

In 1983, Salmons purchased a parcel d 
land in Chesapeake to pursue his first love 
— row crop farming. The com he raises 
feeds his hogs and supplies two other hog 
operations. 

"The hogs are still the bread and butter. 
They pay the bulk of the bills," he 
explained, adding the hogs are sold directly 
to GwaltneyA-utcrs in Smithfield for 
processing. 

Salmons is the 31st winner of the Man dL 
the Year in Agriculture Award. The honor 
was presented during a banquet at the 
oceanfront The recipient is selected from a 
committee comprised of previous winners, 
said Virginia Beach Department of 
Agriculbire Director Lou Cullipher. 

Salmons admits to being taken aback by 
the accolade. 

"I'm not young anymore!" he chuckled. 
"Next year I'll be able to put someone m 
the spot, which will be nice. 1 guess they 
look for someone who has done some work 
in the community and, of course, farmed 
and been successful at iL" 

Salmons lives and works by a simple 
philosophy: "You take what you can get. 
That's something you cjui't change." 

He believes in treating employees fairly 
— he has about eight people — and 
complimenting them when they've done a 
good job. And he knows the formula to 
succe^ul farming is lots of hard work. 

"Farming is not something where you can 
get up at 8 or 9 in die morning. You do have 
to put in a lot of time or you'll never make 
it. With the weather die way it is, you have 
to work widiin time frames. It's raining this 
week and next week, so you've only got a 
couple of days in there to get woric done. 

"You have to be ready to go when the 
time is available, because tomorrow may be 
too late." 

A graduate of Kellam High School, 
Salmons is director and vice president of 
the Virginia Beach Farm Bureau. He is also 
a deacon at Oak Grove Baptist Church. 

Name: David Salmons. 

What brought you to this area: 

I've always been here and wouldn't particularly 
care lo live anywtere else. 




Hometown: Virginia Beach. 
Age: 43. 
Nickname: None. 



"Farming is not 
something where you 
can get up at 8 or 9 in 
the morning. You do 
have to put in a lot of 
time or you'll never 
make it. With the 
weather the way it is, 
you have to work 
within the time frames. 
It's raining this week 
and next week, so 
you've only got a 
couple of days in there 
to get work done. You 
have to be ready to go 
when the time is 
available." 

Owid Salfflons. Viifinia Beach 
Mm of th« Year in Agikahim 

Occnpation: Farmer. 

Marital Status: Happily married to 
Marda (a real live wire). 

CbUdren: We have two girls — Stephanie, 
12, arxj Megan, 9. Both ve ac^ve in sports and 
horses. 

PaTorlte morlea: •Titanic," "The 
Fugitive' or almost any movie that has CVnt 
Ea^wood, Hanison Ford or Tommy Lee Jones in 
it 




Magaslnet I read regularly: ScutSi 
Times, too many farm magazines to list and 
Victoria's Seoet catalog! 

Favorite authors: I don't have enough 
free fime le read any good books. 

Payorite night on the town: We 

like to go to dinner wth family and friends, then 
catch a movie. 

FaTorlte restaurants: Dinner at 
Seacrest in Pungo and dessert at Pungo Grill. 
When I can find the time for the drive, we like 
Three Ships Inn on Shore Drive. 

Favorite meal and beverage: 

Stuffed flounder or a good steak and iced tea. 

What most people don't know 
about myself: That I was foolish enough to 
enter a contest (see Most Embarrassing 
Moment). 

Best thing about myself: I'm proud 
of the fact that I've been able to carry on a family 
traditksn of farming. Also, my wife says I'm very 
patient. 

Worst habit: Too patient sometimes and 
getting stick in larmer overdrive." 

Pets: We are Messed with a goldfish, four 
gert>ils, two dogs, two horses and too many pigs 

tOCOlNt 

Hobbies: Scuba diving, snow skiing, softball 
and Sunday afternoon raps. 

Ideal vacation: When irs cold here Hike 
going anywhere irs hot, the water is 85 degrees, 
teh diving is ^eat and the scenery is good for the 
eyes — and with my famBy m tow! 

Pet peeves: People who try and dictate to 
others how they shoukJ eat, sleep and live their 
Nves. 

First Job: I pulled weeds out of my dad's 
soybran Mds for SO cer^ an hour. 

Least liked Job: Picldng -up roots and 
^m(» from r«wly-cleared farmland. 

Favorite sports teams: N.C. State 
la^cMtall. Balftmm OtMes, Mwa Braves sni 
any team Viat my two girts »e on. 

Favorite musicians: Shania Twin, 
Garfi Bnxrtcs artd most iviy country sing^. 

ll<Mt embamsslng mimient: 

WAnnmg %om4 ptee 'm a *bur«' coma. 

I would like my epitaph to read: 

'I wondw if ifs goir^ to rm kxtey?" 

If I received $1 milUoA: I'd 

(v^atty {^ s«M to {^u^ and a good ctttty, 
tm I ffl^ tuy myselt a new pitia^ mckmi 
mh laywig Iw m mm. 

U I had 10 minutes mt national 
t^evMMi: I wotM tell e\«ryoiit to ricw 
itow), «^y Me Mid speiKl mwe liifM domg 



^■■■wpaMOTSsH^aw 



mmmmammm 



wm 



4 Virginia Bexh Sun, Bridiy. April 17. 1998 



Lynnhaven DAR helps 
new U.S.A. citizens 



ByUIYoiWll 

ClubCorrMOtwdant 

The Lynntavra Fviih OaqMer 
Daughters of the American 
Revolution (DAR) arranged a 
welcoming coemony f(s newly- 
nttufalized citizens this week. The 
event was held in The Walt^ E. 
Hoffman United Sutes Cowt 
House in Norfolk with Judge J. 
Calvitt Clarice Jr. preskiing. 

Before adminittoing ^ Oath of 
Citizenship, the judge asked eadi 
of the 71 can(Udaiesto state his 
name uidthe country from which 
he came. The names ai more than 
25 nations rang out — Mexico, 
Uruguay, Portugal, Nigeria, the 
Philippines. India, Ecuador. 
Bolivia, Turkey, South Korea, 
Cambodia, J^moi, Trinidad, Ibuna. 
Taiwan, the Dominican Rqmblk, 
Australia, Bangledesh, Omda, 
Panama, Israel. Italy. Vietnun. 
Nigeria. Agania and Peru. 

The Naturalization Court is the 
final step in the process oi 
n at ur alization, but the acquisition 
of citizouhip is idso a 
commoicemenC the be^nning of a 
new life as an Amoican diizen. 
United States citizenship is a 
possessicm rqxesratii^the (keana 
and struggles of muy men aid 
women through more than two 
centuries. Tlie new citizen idedges 
his allegiance to the rniity «^ich is 
the strength of this nuion. and 
u:cepts the responsibility that goes 
with the privilege of c^ing 
himself an American. 

The Oath of Citizenship is not 
the flag, not to the govermnent. 
nor to the president, but to the 
Constitution. Similar oaths ane 
required for military or public 
service. But during die Bicentmnial 
of the U.S. Cooxiibtion, the late 
Warren E. Bu^r who served as 
chairman proposed a voliuKary 
oath, by which all citizens could 
exercise patriotism and publicly 



support te Conrttution. 

CottU you^ke sodi an C^h of 
Allegiance? "I do solemnly swear 
that I will lumKHt and defmd the 
Constitution oi the United Stfin 
against all enemies, foreign and 
donestic; and that I will well and 
faithfully discharge my duties and 
reqxmsibilities as a dtizoi of die 
United States." 

Following the Oath of 
Citizraship. Ae welcoming 
ceremony b^an. 

Tlw Vitdgfid Allegiance to die 
flag (tf die Uidted States was tod b^ 
Susan B. Hippen. Seniw Chitf 
USN and a member of die 
Lynnhaven Parish Chapter. 
Neiwlyn St^c. Regent of die 
Chqjter. faHnduceddie speaker. It 
was also aooMied that to become 
an American, one dwuld levn die 
history and traditions of dieir 
adopted country, improve diek 
English so that Uiey can beoct 
communicate, and exercise the 
vote. The chqHa is grateftd to 
Bemice King, election assistant 
from the Norfolk Registrv's 
OfRce. who met aft er wa itfawith 48 
who took the c^portunity to 
r^istff to vote. 

One of these new citizen was 
EUzabedi Villavi(»ncio, who came 
OTiginally from ManaM, Ecuadcv in 
South America. She has lived in 
die Unitn! States for 23 years and 
is a residrat of die Salem Lak« 
area in Virginia Beach. H» four 
chUdrai were bora here and so ae 
Americans. 

She has bero a singte modier for 
seven years. She add she was very 
haippy and planned to improve her 
Englbh. 

Then addec^ "I love diis country 
and its opportunities. To be an 
American citizen is to have your 
own family. If we love each c&itt, 
we will help each other. I have 
tried to teach my children to be 
goodcidzens." 



Giadys Knigiit appears 
at GTE Amphitheater 



The second Virginia Witterfiom 
Intemadonal Arts Festival bimg$ a 
dazzling loKap of artistic 
excellence to die region for 18 days 
Uiis qning. 

From April 23 through May 10 
die world's finest classical music, 
theatre, dance, family 
entertainment, jazz and worid 
music will be jnesoited in venues 
diroughout die Vi^jinia Waterfront 
region. 

The 1998 festival season wiU 
culminate in a Mother's Day 
concert by legendary singer, 
songwriter, actress, c tf reprene i g 
and humanitarian Gladys Knight at 
7:30 p.m. a die Oil 
Anqrtiidieaier in Virginia Beach. 

Knight has performed since die 
age of 4 andat 7. won TedNbck's 
"Amateur How." At die age of 8. 



she teamed up with siblings aid 
cousins to form her "litde gnwp," 
The Pips — famous die worid ovo' 
for hitt like "Every Beat of My 
Heart," "I Heard It Through die 
Cn^wvine" and "Letter Full of 
Tears." 

Tickets for die Gladys Knight 
concot are $12 to $45. Tidcets 
may be purchased through die 
Festival Box Office in person a 
232 E. Main St. in downknra 
Norfolk; by mail P.O. Box 3595, 
Norfolk, VA 23514; or by fax, 

664-6838. To order tickets by 
phone, call Ticketmaster at 671- 
8100. This concertis gponsoedin 
IMTt by MarassCo and Virginia 
Seafood. Media sponsors inchxle 
Military Newspiqiers of Virginia, 
2WD, 92.9 Lite FM and WTKR 
NewsClannel 3. 



Seminar lets your 'Walk 
Thru the Old Testament' 



The "Walk Thru the Old 
Testament" seminar will be 
conducted at Baylake United 
Mediodist Church locaadat 4300 
Sh(ve Dr. in Virginia Beach on 
SiOKlay, May 3. 

Internationally renowi^ for its 
innovative, entertaining 

SreraitatUHi, the Walk Thru die 
lible mninar utilize BUeractive 
teaming tet^aqaato help peo|rie 
abMrb — and remembos— diey 
key chan^ters, geogrqihy and 
major U»mes of tte mtm CM 

Aattaimn Ooon m ttanedinto 
"ms^"as pMpte sit ix stand near 
"Bible lands and w&mt.' Hie 
vflxiuK five hours, vsti^y nyooe 



Club Notes 



Tte HaiiptoB ^MftCta^iler of 
Tte S^red (M&ert Afloi^tioa 
will neet fw di»»at the Utite 
C^edc CMton Gub on Hnra^, 
April 16 at 6:30 p.m. Rfcar 
Ateindkibrwo Btf^, Medkri 
Cwps. USN, CMBflu^er. 
PcvtraoMh M^b^al CeMer, will 
i^orttM tte m^ttn^^jB piogieat 
of ^ Mv te^M^ ml i^ree 
accas to ^tay aiAcri 
ttd^M*. Par ffl^toA%> 
I aO. 481-1054. 



is abte to master a survey of die 

Old Testament, even if Uiey hoi 

very li^ Bible knowto^ge btfore. 

I^utors apee that for too many 

veofHt, reading the Bible is a 

•truggto because Uiey just don't 

know die history or gtoumfity of 

BiMe lands. The Walk Thro die 

Bit^ sraiinar is die best way to 

overcome diat bsrierin just a few 

entertaining hours. It can be s^ 

that even a seminary graduate can 

lean a diing or two fitm this 

semnar. 

Anyoi» intoesied in Mencfing 
the soninv dmdd cMttct Pe^^y 
Agee in Bayfadce (Atol Melodist 
Church's office, 464-2423. 



He Adam ThonMi^ood 
diapmtrf tte rtetad I^nghm 
of die An^viu Revolutioi wiU 
hold its taanMy ^eaing on Ap^ 
16 « 10 a.m. M dK Virginia Beach 
Qmrd Ubwy. Foi more 
infwmatioa call Jo Ann Mtthi^. 
437-913L 

1^ BtaA De^xaaicaub wU 
meet SiMndqr, April 18 at 9:30 
a.n. M Mam«M's (Mm^m on 
L^cB Road. CtaM ipe^a wU be 
VbiIm BsKftO^ Mi(% Oflfco- 
ftm to &d necinct Iw te*er 
iaflaraMtfOB c^ 467-2441 or^l- 




(^vfe)LB«Tid 




wniiam caufvm 



johnF.Malbon 



TomNatJghton 



Neptune chair, Tritons named 



The 25tb annual Neptune 
Festival lea(ters and Court of 
Tritons have be«i named: 

■ William F. Rountree Jr., 
chairman of die 1998 Neptiine 
Festival, grew up in the 
Hampton Roads area and for 
die last 20 years has been quite 
active in dw community. 

He is on the executive 
committee of The Virginia 
Beach Foundation and serves 
in an adviscny capacity for the 
Atlantic Wildfowl Heritage 
Museum, and a life sponscv for 
the Coastal Conservation 
Association. 

In 1974, he was named 
Norfolk's Outstanding Young 
Man of the Year and also a 
recipient of the Outstanding 
Young Men of America award. 
Commonwealth Magazine, in 
1983 selected him as one of 25 
of Virginia's leading young 
businessmen and in 1984 
Virginian-Pilot featured him as 
one of eight executives "40 
and Under — The Next 
Generation of Movers and 
Shakers." 

In 1993, he was recognized 
by the American Cancer 
Society in Hampton Roads as 
an hcHKved Cancer Sinvivor. A 
graduate of Maury High 
School. Rountree holds a 
master's (tegree in finance from 
HhDtmcHith College. Since 1996 
he has held die position of 
director of new business 
development and investment 
properties for Harvey Lindsay 
Commercial Real Estate. 

■ John Davies, president and 
chief executive officer and 



director of First Coastal Bank, 
will serve as first vice 
chairman of the festival. 

In addition to these activities 
he also serves on the bcMud of 
directors for WHRO, tiie 
Virginia Beach Foundation. 
Kids Voting Virginia, Vi^ia 
Beach Vision, Hampton Roads 
Chamber of Commerce, 
Tidewater Health Care, Inc. 
and Virginia Beach Oen<^] 
Hospital. He also serves in an 
advisory capacity for Virginia 
Weslcyan College and the 
Commonwealth of Virginia 
North Landing and Tributaries 
Scenic River organization. 

In 1988 he received a Bronze 
Leadership award from Junior 
Achievement, Inc. Davies was 
also one of six national 
recipients to receive the 1986 
Presidential Citation Award 
through the American Bankers 
Association. In 1985, he was 
named Outstanding Young Man 
of America. 

■ John F. Malbon, jnesident 
and chief operating officer of 
Papco< will serve as one of the 
Tritons in the King's Court and 
also second vice chair of die 
1998 Neptune Festival. He 
serves as a trustee on several 
boards — Cape Henry 
Collegiate School, James 
Madison University 
Foundation, Bank of 
Tidewater, Tidewater Healdi 
Care and Virginia Beach 
Vision. He also serves on the 
Resort Area Commission. 

■ Tom Naughton, president 
and chief executive officer of 
New Dominion Pictures, will 



serve on King Neptime's court 
as one of the goodwill 
ambassadors. As founder of 
New Dominion, he has taken 
the company into one of 
financing, developing and 
producing award-winning 
television programs fo- 
worldwide distribution. 

In 1996 the company 
received die Virginia Vanguard 
Award presented by die 
Governor and the Virginia 
Chamber of Commerce, as the 
fastest growing, privately held 
company in the 
Commonwealdi of Virgiiua. 

n William Casanova founded 
and serves as presient of 
S3LTD. He will serve as a 
triton. He also served in die 
United Sutes Navy from 1962^ 
1982. He is president of die 
Make-A-Wish Foundation of 
Eastern Virginia and st^es on 
die boards of Virginia Beach 
Visions, Very Special Arts 
Virginia, Inc. and actively 
supports die programs of die 
Virginia Beach Special 
Olymi^s. 

■ Donald H. Patterson Jr.. 
executive vice-president of 
Landmark Communications 
began his m«lia career at The 
Boston Globe. He is a triton for 
die 1998 Neptune Fratival. A 
Vietnam veteran, Patterson has 
been an executive on 
Landmark's corporate staff 
since 1990. 

He server on several boards: 
Cape Henry Coltegiate School. 
The Virginia Marine Science 
Museum, Virginia Beach 
Vision, The Chesapeake Bay 



Foundation Advisory 
Committee. The Chesapeake 
Bay Wine classic and die 
Contemporary Arts Center of 
Virginia. 

■ George Elliott SchaubKh 
Jr., president of American 
Waste Industries and a military 
graduate widi distinction fiom 
William and Mary, was 
elected to its Adiletic Hall of 
Fame. 

In 1976, he also was named 
the Man of the Year for the 
College of William and Mary 
Athletic Foundation. Since 
1994 he has served as 
chairman of die Board at Cape 
Henry CoUegiate School. 

He also serves on die boards 
of The Virginia Beach Marine 
Science Museum and die 
Tidewater Automobile 
Association. Rom 1959 to 1962 
he saved as a member of die 
82nd Airborne of the U.S. 
Army. 

I David L. Bernd is 
president and chief executive 
officer of Sentara Healdi 
System and is a 1998 triton. He 
was die 1984 recipient of die 
American College of Hoqiital 
Adminiatrattm' Robert s. 
Hud^ns National Ycwng 
Hospital Administrator of the 
Year awiTd. 

He wrves on the btmds of 
Cenit Bank for Savings and 
The Hampton Roads Chamber 
of Commerce. He also is a 
trustee at Virginia Wesleyan 
College and chairman of die 
United Way of Soodi Hamptoi 
Roads B(»rd of Directors. 




CtonaW H.Patterson Jr. 





WIIHam F. Rountnee jr. 



George Elliott Sch«teckjr. 



Honors and Awards 



Two Cox High ScIkx)1 studaits, 
senior Christina Hu and scqihcxnore 
Kfelis^ Pears(»i have b^n sdected 
as finalists in the Conp^- 
Buncfestag Youdi Exchange 

Hwy have been awarded a one- 
y^r, all-e(penses-|»id ^change to 
Germany beginning this summer. 
Only nine students were sdected 
fot this honor in the 
Commonwealdi of Virginia and 
only 299 ttu<tents nationwi(te. Hie 
sclKilsship exchange in-ogram is 
sponumd by Ae fecteal 
government of the Unitni Smes 
sidGon^y. 

Steven Lin, 18, a 1997 pHhoie 
ol l^n|»viUeHi0i Sctod, is tte 
winwr at dK i^stigious 
intemttiomi Advam^ PkcaaenA 
SchoteAiwd. 

^»ariugM Hiilip B. A^xMm, 
asm;^ diiwi^ of The CoU^e 
B^ Adwx^ PUce^nt 
ni«Em, "b is « tte ba^ ttf his 
Adtwcsd na«nMt acMMmett 



that he has earned die desi^tation." 
The College Board adminislas 
AP courses curricula md critoia, 
and students throughout the world 
taking die coui^s receive die sane 
examination. Lin took 15 AP 
courses and exams and had ai 
average gra(te of 4.7 out of a 
students wcH'kiwide to receive the 
AP Scholar Awmdand was chosen 
from a pool of 1,151 AP Naional 
Scholars. 

Lin now alt^idsDuke Unif^iity 
in Nwth Carolina where he is a 
l»e-m«i stt^nt He is the son (tf 
Mr. and Mrs. Cheng Y. Lin «rf 
VnginiaBttch. 



comments, "It was tiie ctmuiig 
K^tihK' of stiff, mOam. 
iMnmunity aiMipumts diat oeated 
such a unified effrnt and such a 
success." She adds, 'dualizing 
mart than $2,000 profit for one 
night's activity is amazing. The 
e^^Mttwill becomean annual afflv, 
I'm wst." 

More than 1,2000 people 
tttaKted die event. repit^»Ming 75 
p^t^tt (tf the Cent^ville fieanili^ 
{wticiptting as eid^' ^uiue»8 or 
attendees. 



Cox High School junior Mm 
Monis^te brtrice die mticMial reovd 
for the 100-meter butt«fly at die 
Virginia High School League State 
Swim M^L M(»risette's time wm 
56:42; dw previous record of 56.78 
was set in 1985. Mwrisette, who 
also swims die 200 individual 
mwUey, set i»w district recodsin 
die 100-fly and 200-im and new 
state and regional iec(sis in die 
100-fly. 



CentervUle Ekmentary School 
was i^«idy omted otm of tmi 
state winom of the ^^^^am 
PTA OMBitfngUnit Award. Ite 
school won for creating a 
§^xVsoamimity projKt, Right 
Ni^i, dMcA «wa CaU fm^nus 
duK nraed dsttst ^^000. 

Dr. Judy Lewis, princ^ad. 



The Vmk W. Cox Hi^ Scho<ri 
Band and some of iu monbers 
have won special honors aid 
awvtb dus qmng. 

The band has earned die 
desi^iati«i Virginia Honcx' Bmd 
for the s^:(Nid con^cuti^ ysB. 
This deti|wu» is a result of the 
band's superiOT ratings from aU 
judges at the recent vmX>A 
District 11 Festival teU at Sikm 
Hi^ School Md a^swr m^ at 



Cox High School ^MlenB, 
hawng ^KM in die Bc«:h District 
md Emtan Regional toumanwnts, 
imtidpatod in die Virginia High 
School League's State Rxmac 
Touraamrat Mach 21 in 

John Ross, junior, won Qm 
place in Extempora^xu Sp^^ 
- Foreign; Jute Btbex, tmku. won 
Uurd place in Poeffy; md A^ 
Agarwal. mam, won sc^wdi in 
Extempooneoiu Sf^dng 
Da^tts. 



Virginia Beach Sun. Friday, April 17. 19W 5 




Council weighs tax relief programs 



The Gifted Education 
Community Advisory Commitlce 
will hold its seventh meeting of 
the school year on Monday, April 
20 at Kemps Landing Nfi^net 
School. The school is located at 
525 Kempsville Road. The 
meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. 
and conclude by 8:30 p.m. All 
interested parents and community 
members are invited to attend. For 
mOTB information call the Office of 
Gifted Education and K^ign^ 
Schools, 563-1255. 



Single Parents of Virginia Beach, 
Parents Without Partners is 
hosting its mondily open dance for 
mcn and women who have become 
single again as a result of divorce, 
separaticm or death. Music, dancn^ 
and the chance to me^ other single 
parents in a friendly atmoq>hae 
will be (^CTedat Price's BBO,402 
S. Military Hwy. on Saturday, 
April 25. Dancing begins at 9 p.m. 



The Gtetwood Elementary 
Gators are getting ready for their 
annual carnival at Glenwood 
Elementary School. This year's 
Swampfest will be held on 
Saturday, May 2 from 10 a.m. to 3 
p.m. Advance sale tickets will be 
available April 27 through May 1. 
Advance sale tickets will cost five 
for $1. At the door, tickets will 
cost four for $1. 



CenUnuMl frtm Pag* i 

Councilman Louis R. Jones su4 
it's not that the older taxpayers 
object to paying taxes but to 
paying increased taxes because of 
hi^io assesanoits. 

"Oie city now offers relief in 
various kams — outright 
exemption on a gr»!uat«l scale, 
deforals of tax payment and a 
freeze Mtax^. 

But, said councilman HaroU 
Heisch(4)a'. the exemption is by 
far the most popular progrmn 
because it allows the property 
omwx to keq> his home without 
leaving d^oied taxes f(v his heir to 
pay- 
Also, Heischober said, the 
exemption turns out to the the 
les9» tax. The other ptoptaas are 
not used, he said. 

The criteria, in addition to 
income include net worth and 
other relative income such as the 
income of a relative living with the 
individual. The city has the legal 
flexibility granted by the State 
Code to raise the income, net 
worth and relative income 
exclusion thresholds. 

To encourage more people to 
take advantage of the freeze or 
deferral programs, councilwoman 
Barbara Henley said, the city might 
consider higher caps for those 
programs. 

Block said that for lower-income 
people, a flat exemption is • 
jneferaUe. For others, a freeze at a 



higher level will in'ovide an 
ORXMtunity not to pay more taxes. 

It is difficult, said Block, because 
of lack of current data todeiennine 
net worth. Under the current city 
program, net worth is capped at 
$70,000 to qualify {(x the ptogfwn. 
The current state limit is 
$150,000. 

Senate Bill 677 which awaits the 
governor's signature raises the 
income threshold for real estate to 
the greato- $52,000 of the income 
limits tased upon family size for 
the respective metropolitan 
statistical area annually published 
by the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development for qualifying 
for fedoal housing assistance aid 
the net worth limit to $195,000. 

Historically, the city has 
increased the thresholds to offset 
cost-of living increases for social 
security and private pensions. 
Social Security is now included in 
total income, but, Bkxk said, bills 
are before state legislators to 
eliminate that irclusion. 

Block said he would bring 
additional information to council 
to assist in die d«;ision making. 

The second part of the saaor 
housing report, which concons 
multi-family issues, reoMnmends 
finding the gaps in housing 
available to %ni(H^ and to provkle 
incentives to developos to help fill 
these gaps. '"' 

Councilwoman Barbara Henley, 
who with councilwoman Nancy 
Parker serves on the Senior 



Historically, the 
city has Increased 
the thresholds to 
offset cost-of- 
living increases for 
Social Security and 
private pensions. 
Social Security is 
now included in 
total income. 



Housing Committee which 
prepared the report, said that the 
goal is to encourage senior housing 
"but to make sure you get good 
senior housing." 

A major g^ in Virginia Beach is 
the availability of subsidized 
apartments for lower-income 
seniors. Currently there arc 367 
subsidized apartments in Virgbiia 
Beach for Iowa income older adults 
and these have waiting lists 
ranging fiom six to nine months at 
Bedi Shalom Sands and up to four 
or five years at Russell House. 

There may be even more that 
who need the facilities, said Henley 
chairman of the committee, but 
some give up after seeing the long 



waiting lists. 

Henley said she said that the use 
of the city's auxiliary grant 
program "bothers me a lot" 
Auxiliary grants are available from 
social services to low income 
seniors in a fixed i»yment amount 
for an assisted living unit and 
services of approximately $774 a 
month. 

But, in Virginia Beach, Marian 
ManOT is the only facility that will 
Kcept the auxiliary grants leaving 
clients to go to other cities to tdce 
advantage erf the grants. 

She suggested that homes 
willing to accept the auxiliary 
grants be allowed more density in 
exchange for |nx}viding four ot five 
auxiliary grant units. She said, in 
contrast to the grant, the private 
cost of assisted living units at 
$1,500 to $4,500 a month. 

She said that the hesitmcy in 
providing auxiliary grant units can 
be attributed to the additional paper 
work and the smaller amount (A 
income. She said that Marian 
N^uior, who allows clients to share 
rooms to reduce the cost is a good 
compromise. 

Kathleen O'Connor, with older 
adult services of the Community 
Service Board and a m«nber<rf the 
committee, said that some 
developos just don't know about 
the grants. 

Andrew Friedman, director rf 
Housing and Neighborhood 
Preservation, said that the staff 
intends to provide guidelines so 



tint devekjpers have ntKjre 
information before they start a 
project 

The committee finds that a 
density bonus is the method by 
whkh city council can mmt em\y 
provide an incentive for tlw typ« 
of senior tousing projects whidi 
the city has deckled it needs. Otfier 
incentives are providing dty-cwned 
land at a reduced cost, providing or 
supporting low interest financing 
such as develqpment bonds and 
outright fanu such as the ecoiKNnic 
^velopment investment prc^nm 
w other grants. 

The committee has recommended 
minor revisions to the zoning 
onlinance p^taining to mdependent 
senior housing, assisted living and 
nursing care facilities. 

The issues become more logent 
as the numbers of seniors in 
relation to the rest of the 
p(q)ulation continue to inoease. In 

1996 there were almost 34 million 
people age 65 and older in die 
United States (the Virginia Beach 
report uses 62 as the starting age); 
in 2030 there will be 70 million 
people in the age group. Many 
m«e (rf tomorrow's senicws will be 
vetyoM (85 OT older). 

In 1980. 4.5 percent of the city's 
population was age 65 «■ over, by 
1990 the number had increased to 6 
percent or 23.214 persons and in 

1997 an estimated 7.3 pNcentwoe 
65 and older. By the year 2002 an 
estimmed 8 pncent are e>q)ectedto 
be 65 plus. 



Cox High School PTA will hdd 
a plant sale May 2 from 9 a.m.-2 
p.m. at the school. Available will 
be azaleas, geraniums, hanging 
baskets and bedding plants. All 
proceeds will go to benefit the 
ichool. 



SEAL takes ultimate mental, physical challenge 



Windsor Odes Elementaiy 
School will hold a Sfving book fEur 
from May 18-22. This will be a 
"buy one. get one free" sale. Hicrc 
will be a):qHt)ximaiely 1.800 bodes 
to choose from. 



Arrowhead Elementary is 
providing an opportunity tor 
parents of fifth graders to learn 
more about their child's nwklle 
sdhool in. order to make Uie 
tran^ti«r""i!tocess go" ma* 
smoothly. Representatives fiom 
Larkspur Middle School will be 
available to share information aid 
answer questions on April 27 from 
7-8 p.m. in the school's cafetoia. 



Conthuisd From Pag* 1 

"I wanted to do an adventure 
race and have always been very 
athletic. Usually. I excel in these 
types of events," he explained. 

Scott initially wanted to lead a 
dir^-man team, but was unable 
to find two others with his 
physical and emotional stamina. 

"You have to look at the 
incredible training commitment 
for this, because the training 
cycle is more difficult that the 
race itself. And its ongoing. It 
takes aboal ax months to prepare 
f(s something like this." he said. 

This year's Beast of the East, 
set fa- June, is the first adventure 
race ever to have a solo category. 
Scott knew he couldn't do it. 
tiKMigh, without a good motivator. 



"I thought about what I would 
need after constantly moving fiv 
48 hours. 72 hours or 96 hours. 
What would I need to stay 
focused and keep going?" 

He continiKd. "I didn't have to 
search too far — my son, who 
has cerebral palsy. UCP is a 
good cause and a good 
OTganization. I could tie it in to a 
very personal goal. It was the 
motivation I needed." 

On New Year's Day, when 
most people were making 
resolutions to start exercising, 
Scou began his aix-day-a-wedk, 
four-to-six-hours daily regimen. 
His workouts consist of muscular 
strengthening and endurance and 
cardiovascular sessions. 

It's not uncommon for him to 
train for 24 hours around the 



clock, and part d his 
preparations will include a 
double ironman triathlon. ' 

In a typical training session 
Scott runs as much as 30 miles 
with a 30-pound pack on his 
back, then "cools ofP with a 75- 
mile mountain bike ride. 

All diis will prepare him for the 
biannual race sponsored by 
Odyssey Adventure Racing <rf 
Virginia Beach. 

Beast of the East, which begins 
June 21 at Clay tor Lake State 
Park in western Virginia, requires 
participants to Whitewater 
paddle, climb, rappel. mountain 
bike, hike and orienteer. They'll 
paddle class II/III rapids in the 
New River, climb the highest 
peaks in Virginia and bike along 
Appalachian Mountain trails. 



'This race is going to be one of 
die toughest challenges I've ever 
faced." said Scott. 

Scott is finding that getting his 
body ready for the rigorous race 
isn't the challenge. 

Raising $30,000 fw UCP is. 

Ah-eady he has secured sevo^al 
sponsors — Inside Out Sporu. 
North End Cyclery, Ocean 
Seafood Market, Eddie Bauer 
Inc., UDT/SEAL Association. 
Tracy's Oyster Bar. London 
Bridge Trading Co. and Extreme 
Sports — but needs more to meel 
his goal. 

"The thing is that people are 
solicited so often that many 
times their ears are just not op^ 
to it." Scou said. 

"How do you get folks who 
want to help? I may be wrong, 



but all the Mher teams diat have 
entered are racing for themselves. 
I'm racing for a cause. My whole 
life is consumed with training 
and campaigning for this." 



Those wishing to help Scott 
reach his goal of $30,000 fiar 
United Cerebral Palsy stould 
make their check payable to 
UCP and mail to 5690 Greenwich 
Rd, Virginia Beach. VA., 23462. 

Those wishing to to dcn)ate to 

l^cott'^^-aci^g costs should make 

tfeir check payable to him at 

P.O. Box 55442, Virginia Beach, 

VA., 23471-5442. 

Scott can also be e-mailed at 
AScott4220@M)l.com. His voice 
mail number is 481-2905. 



Single Parails of Virginia Beach, 
Chapter 216 Parents Without 
Partners, offers a healdiy, 
supportive, educational 
environment for single-parem 
families of all ages. New membo' 
orientations are heldevoy Ntoiday 
evening. For more informaticHi 
call, 498-2666. 



Jaycees mark 50 years of service to others 



Polish those penny loafers and 
brush those blue suede shoes. On 
April 22 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 
p.m. at Saint Nicholas Catholic 
Church the Virginia Beach 
Department of Social Services will 
hold a '50s-style luncheon in 
recognition of more than 200 
.volunteers and area churches who 
contributed more than 35,000 
hours in 1997 assisting citizens in 
need. 

"Volunteers Rock Around The 
Clock" is the theme of this year's 
event. The staff at Social Sovices 
will show their appreciation by 
serving the volunteers in a diner 
atmosphere. Everyone will be 
sporting white sport coats, pink 
carnations, poodle skirts, peddfe 
pushers, saddle oxfords, rolled up 
tees and penny loafers. The 
volunteers will feast on "nxmi's 
pot roast" with green beans, 
whipped potatoes, hot rolls, pink 
lemonade ami fresh a|^le pie. 

In addition, the volunt^rs will 
be entertained with a 'SOs musical 
revue pafotmalby the adult choir 
from Saint John's United 
Methodist Church. 



Continuad From Paga 1 

General, ths rescue squad, and die 
library system. They also initiated 
the honoring of the city's First 
Citizen, they helped to r^iuild 
Seatack Paric. and they helped get a 
school bond refoendum passed that 
had previously been defeated. 

They lit and have maintained the 
Flame of H(^ at Oceana, they nm 
the East Coast Surfing 
Championships and continue to 
send ^lecial children to camp at 
Camp Virginia Jaycees dutxigh 
their Kids to Camp. 



The organization has been 
meaningful on the personal as well 
as civic level. 

Sheila Ferguson, a former 
i»esident of the Jaycettes and 
Jaycee life member said. "It 
changed my life." The netwraking 
of people and the indivichial 
development offered by the 
organization have heightened Ikt 
sense of self esteem. 

"It's been things that I have used 
die rest of my life and I mean that 
from die bottom of my heart," she 
added. 



Although she left the 
organization when she passed die 
age limit, die friendships that she 
made during her membership have 
stayed widi her over the years. 

Gary Mclntyre. a former Jaycee 
president, agreed that the Jaycee 
organization has also been 
consequential for him. "It's likely 
one of the most significant 
activities aside frt)m family that I 
have everexpoioiced." he said. He 
also found that die organizatkm's 
individual (kvelopment and 
leadership training have had 
immediate transfer power to his 



income generating activities. 

A chapter member for 1 1 years 
and a former Jaycees piesidait, 
Beth McOsker, met her husbmid 
through the organization and got 
mamed die yeardiat she was kxal 
president. Holding 18-month-old 
Michael McOsker, she took a few 
moments to explain what Jaycees 
had meant to her personally. "Fun, 
fellowship and community 
ser/ke," she said. 

Last year Beth Stevens, a formo- 
Virginia Beach Jaycees |»esideitt, 
performed an individual teadershi] 
training seminar for members o' 



methods of becoming a guide fc 
the blind. This year several pa 
presidents have served on ( 
Jaycees' statt level. 

To join the OTganization ca 
499-8822. Annual dues are $60. 
Members must be between die a^M 
of 21 and 39 and be willing to get 
involved in civic pojects. 



For more iirfonruuion about the 
golf tournament and dinner on 
Af»il 25 call. 474-0983. All past as 
well as present members of the 
Virginia Beach Jaycees are 
invited. 



Option proposes building Bayside Library addition 



Wmdsor Oris Bkmmusy 
School will be having a Spring 
Carnival Satimky, May 9 from 9 
a.m. U) 3 p.m. Activity includea 
dunking booth, cidKwalk, tano(», 
dffit throws, flying RA, bnriE^bril, 
performances by dieoleadas, 
karate demonstrations and miKh 
mOTe. Our a(k^-a-Kho(d pvtws 
ftom te Navy will dM be making 
(k^li^s. 



May 19 is the annual Fvnily 
Fun and Fitness Night at 
Glenwood Elementary Schocrf. 
Aim the 7 p.m. PTA bumns 
n^etiiVt tte {W^ia, stnlentt nl 
gtf memb«i mil im^ 
itaoo^Mt tte Khool U) psforai 
^Oa, ipoitt I^IPH^ 



By Lm CafiNI 

Cav Council Rapwtaf 

The city staff has leoonmiended 
combining the Bayside Unary 
addition with the police pnedna 
ixoject as a modifiedoption for die 
library's infin^ructtueand sovioe 
oihanconott program. 

Hie $15,000 sqiwe-foMaddUon 
alone would have cost $2.9 
million. The amibined|Rojeawill 
ctm $5.6 millioa. 

E.Dean Block, director irf 
management and the bwiget, tcH 
council at a budget wotUk^ 
Tu^tay.dMtthebeMiniroach fv 
bott iffo^cts, WK% (he dty dBCtded 
to k^p te tile, «^ to tk> bMh 
ITO^ctsttdM^nMtime. He aid 
that it would be diffbolt to dote 
Ubouy nd ttei reen teer to buiM 
the pf«ciKt b«:tti%of tte small 
s»(tftte»ie. 

Since te Itbisy aafr«Kl boael 
fltM p^Medits aeete hm ^rU 
frra BvMHniDioD (kiDvprapira 
u4 m^amdix^tM to caU for a 
retoraidwi for citixm ^ftoy^ of 
the eipmMiiae whkb woiM r»itt 
in a r^ ^MM ttx ni^naete 
tea bem ^jecM to 



The latest options, presented 
Tuesday would call for lax 
increases ranging from a 0.7 cent 
tax increase to a 3.4 cent tax 
increase which would take care <A 
die entire jsogram. Council, which 
already has a school bond 
refoeiKhimon its plate for next 
Novembw.is expeciwlto decide on 
a liixary referendum at the same 
time. 

Bltx^k has su^^ted using die 
city's fluid balance fax the coitral 
library renovation, which is 
included in all options, tte 
reroofing/heating and m 
comUtioning reliabilitadOTi «tae 
needed «id a new Pt^c^BtadcwHo- 
teility which wiU be ootttucted 
wtt te Cme^EkmmmyStAocA 
and Is ^fft of the school bond 
lenRaAsit. 

Refurbishing the aging 
infr^Bracaveor the city's Ui«i» 
otf y wobM oto a ttx matmt of 
0.7 CMtt ml wmild iiKlwte lo 
^ditfoa M the central Vbmy 
renovalwn, Ac WiiuiaH' Woods 
renovation, the Bayside 
repl^ment with the poUce 
precinct replacement, tte 

te 



Kempsville renovation and die 
Great Neck addition. 

Additional options include diese 
Injects but add m«e. 

For instance it «^}uld take a 1.2 
cent tax increase to include all (A 
these projects (except for die 
OceanfrtMit replacement, die 
Kempsville renovation and die 
Great Neck ffildition)plus the new 
I^iiKSSS Anne facility. 

A 2.5 cent tax increase woidd 
include all the previ«isly 
mentkmed projKts vriadd m^^ 
and electronic sayUx. About 60 
positions would be aided whMi 
will piovideaneortwo mOTea^ 
members per shift at more dian 
oght tocttions, said Marcy Sims. 
Ubrvy (Urector. She said th« at 
pFNODt a librvy staff en ^lend »i 
ai^age of tess than two minutes 
ptg visitOT. She said that puaim 
needMp with d^ etetrookmetfia 
md fli^ t^mselves in a oMre 
complex envirma^t. The a»t 
wUI be $1,018,000. 

Tte final op^on woaU requrea 
3.4 ceat tax iKs^ase and wodd 
oKlwIe a new Ck^n Run/Srian 
tmi^ Md Sinxlay Ikmits tt tSL 



A "asnd aloiic" iroject 
alternative is a new facility and 
ttafTmg fOT a library in die Princess 
Anne mta which would require a 
0.9 coit tax increase. 

The pfog^m would encumber the 
fund balance by $8.6 million. 
Using these Ainds wouk! wOTk for 
the infrastructure niproveroaits, 
said Block, but not for staff costs 
becmue of ^ recwri^ eipeaae. 

MayOT^ Kfeyera (Xmndorf urged 
incln^g projects all over die city 
in a lefiaenkffli. She said diat die 
city fiuledin its f^enodam when 



it included one lecieaiion ceMer at a 
time, but was successful whoi 
laying out a system fw the entire 
city. 

The way the cations are set up 
the council can single out ^dfing 
and StHiday hours, Bkxk said. 

Sims said that adding SuKby 
hours will cost a half million 
dollars. 

Council is expected to make a 
decision on die refnoKlumat die 
May 6 budget leconciliatkm 
wofkriMp. 



Women in ministry tallt set 



"The Place of Women m 
Ministry" will be the ti^ic erf 
discussicm at the Fourth Amuud 
Azusa StTMt Lecoire Series at 
Regent University School of 
Uvinity m Aprfl 21. 

Dr. Jody Brown of Sprii^fi^ 
Miss, will deliwr the keyime 
lectwe KKXi in die Moot Ccxut in 
Rcrtiot^a Hall on the R^qh 

, irt» is wMnd wM iw 



Assembles of God, is profi^aor of 
church ministries at Central MMe 
College in Sfvingfield, Miss. Oe 
hassravedasam^Kmsry andalao 
» a s»mpastOT. Hea^ tetive wUl 
be \ms^ on her 1996 bo(A, 
"Wmnen Minisiera AccartU^ to 
Scf^nae." 

lie teMe will be Mhwetf bf a 



IVPI 



mBmm 



tmm 



Ma«i 



iP 



I 



6 Virginia Beach Sun. Friday, April 17, 1998 

Creative collectives on 
show at Craft Market 



Like bees drawn to nectar, more 
than 10,000 people from 
throughout the Mid-Atlantic ae 
expected to su^ at the 12th annual 
Virginia Beach Spring CraftMaricet 
at the Virginia Beach Pavilion 
during Azalea Festival ««dcend, 
April 24-26. 

The region's largest spring aaft 
show, open each day from 10 a.m. 
to 6 p.m., will transform the 
Pavilion into an exciting 
marketplace with more than 200 
artists and craftspeople from some 
20 states. Among their wares will 
be outdoor collectibles, spring 
home-decorating ideas, fine arts aid 
other one-of-a-kind creations. 

New this year is Heritage 
Celebration!, a forum in which 
Hampton Roads guilds give on- 
going demonstrations in the spirit 
of preserving the traditional crafts. 
The on-site quilters, weaves, 
spinner and potter are sure to 
enlighten and entoiain all ages — 
men, women and children, alike. 

Two more attractions will be 
back by popular demand. Lee 
McWhortcr, owner of La Dama 
Maya Herbe and Flower Farm in 
Luray, Va., will set up A Gantai 



Marketplace with fresh herbs, 
potted butterfly plants, gardm 
statuary and more, all in time kt 
spring planting. Specialty food 
vendors will promote A Taste Of 
Spring with gourmet gifts. 

Admission to the Virginia Beach 
Spring CraftMarketis $S fm adults 
and free for children under 12. A 
donation of canned food for the 
Foodbank of Southeastern Virginia 
is worth $1 off of admission and a 
lot more to Hampton Roads* 
homeless and hungry. More than 
100,000 tons of food wctc collected 
at the Virginia Beach Spring 
CraftMarket and Virginia Beach 
Christmas Maricet in 1997 alone. 

The Virginia Beach Spring 
CraftMarket is the sister of the 
annual Virginia Beach Christmas 
Market, traditionally scheduled 
during Thanksgiving wedcend. 
Both are produced by Events 
Management Group Inc. of 
Virginia Beach. The Christmas 
Market is the largest holiday craft 
show in Hampton Roads, drawing 
up to 20,000 people. It is 
consistently ranked in the top 200 
craft shows in the country by 
Sunshine Artists masazine. 



Cape Henry Collegiate 
hosts powerful exhibit 



"Home of the Brave" by Mary 
Motley Kalergis, a powerful aid 
moving portrait of America 
illustrated through the faces and 
voices of its caitemporary 




Kalergis 



pioneers, is on exhibit at Cape 
Henry Collegiate School through 
July 4. 

The photography show originated 
at the Chrysler Museum and is on 
losn from the collection of the 
artist. Kalergis, who is an alumna 
of the Everett School, is currendy 
working on her fifth publication. It 
is entitled "Seen and Heard," a 
book about teenagers, to be 
published by Stewart, Tabori and 
Chang in the fall. 

Her black and white photogr!q)hy 
has been exhibited in museums and 
galleries internationally including 
Hie Smithsonian Institution, The 
International Center of 
Photography and The San Antonio 
Museum. 

Kalergis will be available tor 
conversation and book signing in 
the gallery on Monday from 1 to 3 
p.m. 

Cape Henry Collegiate School is 
located at 1320 Mill Dam Rd. For 
more information call, 481-9478, 
exL 234. 



Wesleyan open house Saturday 



Virginia Wesleyan College will 
host an open house on April 18 for 
high school students and their 
parents to learn more about the 
college, tour the campus and meet 
die faculty. 

The schedule begins with 
registration and refreshments from 
9 to 9:30 a.m. in Cunningham 
Gymnasium, followed by 
orientation and faculty speakers 
from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m., tours of 
the VWC campus from 10:30- 
11:45 a.m.; academic departments 
and Club Fair from 11:45 a.m.- 
12:30 p.m. in the gym; lunch in 
the Boyd Dining Center from 
12:30-1:45 p.m.; and a closing 



questions and answer session from 
1:45-2:15 p.m., also in the Dining 
Colter. 

During the open house, students 
and parents will have an 
opportunity to learn more about 
academic programs, financial aki, 
extracurrKular activities and social 
life on campus. Faculty members 
from every department will be 
present to answer questions from 
suidoits wd parents. 

Th^e is no chaise for lunch or 
other events included in the open 
house. For reservations or fiirdier 
information call the Admissions 
Office, 455-32(^. 



m(4P0(HJ 



No Payment 'Till June 



r^M)! IndtMte: 

• Fitar and pump 
•S«Hn vinyl Kf^ 
•HMvy gaug* bracing 
•Hugetundack 
•Faneaw«dtttfra 
•Podladdar 



The 
Detramk) 




00% 
FINAJdNGft 
WSTAUAIKM 



HOME OWNERS ONLY-CALL NOW ■ 
CALL TOLL FREE - FRSE HOME SUKVtY 

1(800)373-4531 ^SE 




Take a musical break during 'Liberty Call' 

I 1 II .11 ___.«..•_- ^.11 1 •! i_ . ^-Il" -* T 'J 



The Doorway Singers, a Vir^nia-based vocal ensemble, will present "Uberty Call, Liberty Call" at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 25 at Virginia Beach 
United Methodist Church, 19th Street and Pacific Avenue. The show is staged as a war bonds radio drive and pulls together the drama, concern, 
dedication and patriotism which characterized America In the 1940s. The dght-volce ensemble will present "EmbraceaWe You,' "It's a long Way 
to Tipperary" and other favorites. A fit^will offering will be received, and nursery service will be provided. Call 428-7727 for more Informatton. 



Spring is blooming at park 



Legal 
Notices 



First Landing/Seashore State 
Park and Natural Area has several 
special events planned in May: 

■ May 2, What Plant Is This? - 
A nice leisurely walk along our 
famous Bald Cypress Nature Trail 
that fociison the park's uiriqueand 
diverse plant life. Hike begins at 
10 a.m. at die Visitor Center. 

■ May 3, Beach Stroll -Idmtify 
the fossils of clams, crabs, snails, 
sharks and other remnants of sea 
life that have been dqx)sitedon our 
beach. Meet in the campgrouiKl 
parking lot at 9 a.m. 

■ May 7, 14 and 28, In ad 
Around First Landing - Slide/tidk 
program about die park activities, 
other state parks and area 
attractions. Program begins at 7 
p.m. at die park picnic shelter. 



■ K4ay 10, Bald Cypress Swamp 
Stomp - The creature from the 
black Lagcxm does not live in our 
swamp but a lot of otho- 
fascinating creatures do. Come and 
explore them with us. Hike leaves 
from die Visitor Center at 1 p.m. 
For information call 481-4836. 

■ May 13, Birding In Tk; 
Narrows - Improve your birding 
skills and just maybe spot m 
osprey. Hike leaves from the 64th 
Street Contact Station at 8:15 a.m. 
For information call 481-4836. 

■ May 17 and 24, Osprey hike- 
Observe these majestic rsptats 
upon their return to the park. Hike 
leaves from the 64di Sti^t Contaci 
Station at 8:15 a.m. For 
information call 481-4836. 

■ May 23, Sunprinting - A 



unique and different way to make 
prints of nature. Program begins at 
10 a.m. at the Visitor Center. For 
information call 4814836. 

■ May 25, Children's scavenger 
hunt - Children will love this 
^venture! Program begins at 10 
a.m. in the campground parking 
lot. F(Hr information call 4814836. 

■ May 29, Crabbing - Leam 
how to catch those elusive 
Chesapeake Bay blue crabs. 
Program begins at 7 p.m. at the 
Big "H" Dune Crossover in the 
campground. 

■ May 30, Night Hike - Always 
a wonderful experience. Hike 
begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Visitor 
Couer. Pre^egistration is required. 

Call 4814836 for infonnation 
about any of the events. 



Public Notice 



Auction: 1989 CHEVROLET 
CAVALIER 

Serial: 1G1JC111XKJ3 16360 

Auction Date: 4/18/98 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Tidewffler 
Acceptance Corporation, 7000 N. 
Military Highway, Norfolk, Va 
23518. 

Tidewater Accqwatoe Corp 
reserves die right to bid. 

16-5 
,. It4-17 



p^bncNoHcii 



'Embedded l\/letaphor' opens locally 



The unoccupied bed reflects some 
of the most personal issues in our 
lives, from dreams to love to birth 
and deaUi. For many contemporary 
artists the subject of the bed 
remains an evocative metaphor. 

In the Contemporary Art CeMer 
of Virginia's "Embedded 
Metafrtior," die deliberate use (tf die 
vacant bed allows the exhflnt 
artists to comment on the ibseax ' 
of the body, representing loss or 
longing. The artists interpret die 
bed from a variety of perspectives 
ranging from the personal to die 
collective. 



Contemporary issues an 
adAessedin the exhibition such as 
homelessness. Bed equivalents — 
sleeping bags, sidewalk gratings, 
benches and cardboard shelters are 
makeshift sleeping quarters fix 
mrniy urban homeless. Curatedby 
Nina Felshin, "Embedded 
MttapboT illustrates die bed as a 
forum of expression on cultural, 
political and personal issues. 

An opening reception and 
membership open house will be 
held Ainil 24 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. 

Tliat evening, die Dolpfiin Circle 
of the Kings Daughters will 



Steven B. Powers, M.D. 
Peter J. Kemp, M.D. 

Board Certified OBIGYN 

Provlitti^ Family Cortcml Pre-NaUl 

Care • Bbrth Omtrol • Gynccolo^c 

8l Laser S^trfcry • Hystcrcctopy 

• IntotUlty • Almomud 

Pa|M - Detected & lyatnl 

• Cdpotctqiy & Leq} 




436-0167 

6S0 KiHgdfofoujh Squeak 



present Dipping for Diamonds. A 
$10 contribution entities guests to 
a glass of chilled champape and 
the chance to win a .5 carat 
diamond. Proceeds benefit die 
CHKD Dolphin Adaptive 
Technology Lab at the CHKD 
SpMch and Language Center and 
the Contemporary Art Center of 
Virginia. A slide presentation on 
future exhibitions, tours and 
educational demonsU'ations will 
also be a part of Uiis open house 
event 

At 6 p.m. the String Enxmble 
from Cox High School will 
petfonn under die directkxi d' Mary 
Tanner followed by the Jason 
Delacniz Trio from Tallwood High 
SchooL Embedded Metaphor will 
be on view al the Contonporary 
Art Cwitcr of Virginia diraigh 
JuiK 28. For more information 
caU. 425-0000. 



Very Special 
Arts Show set 

Very Special Arts Virginia Beadi 
will present an idult m»ittx^p 
{fft^am art show at Visions Art 
Gallery of Pembroke Mall on 
Sattffday, Apil 18 from 7-9 p.m. 
For additional information call, 
4374900. 



Auction: 1989 CHEVROLET 

Serial: 1G1LV1416KY250363 

Auction Date: 4/18/98 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Tidewater 
Acceptance Corporation, 7000 N. 
Military Highway, Norfolk, Va 
23518. 

Tidewater Acceptance 
Corporation reserves the right to 
bid. 

16-6 
U4-17 



Public Notice 



Where Can I ( iet riie Mones? 



\(>n. 



\\ I- \iis\\ . I I 




FAST • KPfNOAKE • BCPraTSEimCE 

We Spedali^ in Sdving Your Credit Probtems 






CASH 



CHRYSLER HOME MORTGAGE CORP. 

436-4933 




Virginia: 

The regular meeting of die City 
Council of the City of Virginia 
Beach will be held in die Council 
Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Municipal Cento', 
Princess Anne Station. Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on Tuesday, April 
28, 1998 at 6:00 p.m.. at which 
time the following qjplicttkms 
wiUbeheant 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSmCATION: 

KEMPSVILLE B0R01X}H 

1. An Ordinance upon 
A{^lication of MatiUa Russell for 
a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from A-12 
Apartment District and 0-2 Office 
District to R-5S Residential Single 
Family District on the east si(k (rf^ 
S. Kentucky Avenue, 183 feet 
soudi of Bonney Road on Lot 7-12 
& 13, Block 1, Midway. The 
proposed zoning classification 
change to R-5S is for single family 
resid^tial land use on lots no less 
than 5000 square feet. Ite 
Comprehensive Plan iecomm«ids 
use of this parcel for sibuit»n 
resictential/pi^um & high density 
at densities that are com(»tible 
with townhouse and multi-family 
use in accordance widi odier Plan 
policies. Said parcel contain 
20,996 square feet 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

2. An Ordinance upon 
Application of O & R, Inc., a 
Virginia Corporaticm for a Oiange 
of Zoning Disttict ClassiAatim 
from B-2 Cmnmunity Biwnes 
District. R-SD ^^kwkl Dqist 
District 4 P-1 VmtrnOon 
DistTKt U) A-18 ApmatM^ District 
with a PD-H Planned Uwt 
E^veJtq^^ O^vtay fm mitm 
property hxM^ at the norti«^ 
interaction of Shore Drive «k1 W. 
Stratfoni Road. The ppqxMid 
zoning clanificaticNi chn^ to A- 

OMithnNd On ^^ 7 



• 



ContlnuMl From Ngt e 

18 with a PD-H overlay is fa 
multi-family land use at a density 
no greater than 18 dwelling units 
per acre. The Comprehensive Han 
reojmmends uk of this parcel ftjr 
marketplace corridor and natural 
resources/»}Mervation use in 
accordance with other Han 
policies. Said parcel is located at 
3800 Shore Drive and contains 
4.039 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUOR 

STREET CLOSURE: 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

3. Aiqjlication of O & R, Inc., a 
Virginia Corporation, for the 
discontinuance, closure ml 
abandonment of a portion of 
Powhatan Avenue beginning on 
Uie west side of Powhatan Avenue 
and running between Lots 1 
through 4, Block 40 and Lots 5 
through 14, Block 46 as shown on 
the plat entitled "Survey of Right- 
of-Way Street Closure for a 
Portion of Powhatan Avenue 
Located Between Block 40 and 46 
of Oc«m Park" and recorded in Map 
Book 5, Page 132. Said pared 
contains 35,594 square feet 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

KEMPSVLLE BOROUGH 

4. Application of WeldonT. Jr., 
and Gertrude A. Byrns for the 
discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of a portion of an 
unnamed street beginning at the 
southeast comer of the Norfolk aid 
Southern Railroad right-of-way aid 
running in an easterly direction a 
distance of 163.97 feet. Said parcel 
is 50 feet in width and contains 
8,198.5 square feet. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

5. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Larry's Impot 
Center, Inc., for a Conditional Use 
Permit for an automobile icpm 
garage on the south side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, 150 ftti 
more or less east of Riddle Avenue. 
Said parcel is located at 1803 
Virginia Beach Boulevard and 
contains 1 acre more or less. 
LYNNHAVEN B(»(XJGH. 

NONCONFORMING USE: 
VIRGINL^ BEACH BOROUGH 

6. Application of Clearwtter 
Invesunent Associates, L.P., for 
the enlargement of a 
nonconfcMining use on the east skle 
of Atlantic Avenue between 3Sth 
Street and 36th Street on Lots 1 
through 6, Block 82. Said parcel 
contains .1033 acres more or less. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

7.*- . An, Ordinance upon 
App1ica&» of EdmnfP. & L^te 
A. Kappes a Conditional Uae 
Permit for a miniature golf coiose 
with ice cream parlor at the 
northeast comer of Shore Drive and 
RedTrideRoadon Lots 15, 17 & 
19, Block F, Lynnhavcn Beach. 
Said parcel contains 22,500 square 
feet LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

All interested parties are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith. CMC/AAE 

City Qerk 

If you are i^ysically disabled or 
visually impaired and need 
assistance at this meeting, please 
call the CITY CLERK'S OFFICE 
« 427-4303; Hearing impaired, call 
TDD only 427-4305 (TDD - 
Tdt^onic Device for the Deaf). 

15-1 

2t4-17 



execute a Memorandum of 
Trustee's Sale outlining additional 
terms of sale and settlement, which 
will be available for review prior to 
the announcement of jsale. 

This is a communication from a 
debtcoltenor. 

Glassw and Glasser, P.L.C., 

Substitute Trustee 

Dominion Tower, Suite 600 

999 Watersi<fc Drive 

Norfolk, VA 23510 

Td: (757) 625-6787 Ext. 200 

Between 10:00 a.m. & 12:00 
noon only. 
File No. 42267 

16-7 
2t4-24 



Public NOtiM 



D 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERK'S OFFICE 

IN RE: Natalte Marie Rodrigucc 

CASE NO. CH97-3366 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
change the name of Natalie Marie 
Rodriguez" to "Natalie Marie 
Ortega" 

It is ORDERED Jesus Lqiez 
Rodriguez, Sr., itppearand protect 
his interest, on or before May 28, 
1998, which date is no sooner than 
fifty days afto' entry of this order of 
publication. 

And it is further ORDERED that 
this order of publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun, a new^per of genoBl 
circulation in this City pescribed 
by this couit. 

Date: April 6, 1998 

J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By Bill Maull, Deputy Clerk 

164 
4t5-8 



Public Notice 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERK'S OFFICE 

IN RE: Jesus Lopez Rodriguez, 
Jr. 

CASENO.CH97-3365 
ORDER OF PUBUCATION 

The object of this suit is to 
change die name of Jesus Lopez 
Rodriquez, Jr. to "Jess Lopez 
On^a." 

It is ORDERED Jesus Lopez 
Rodripez, Sr.. appearand protect 
his interest, on or before May 28. 
1998, which dale is no sooner Uian 
fifty days after entry of this order of 
publicatim. ^ 

And it is furth^ ORDERED that 
this order of publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in The Vii^inia 
Be»;h Sun, a newspaper of gmeai 
circulation in this City piesafted 
by diis court. 

Dale: Ajwil 6, 1998 

J. CURTIS FRUIT. CLERK 

By BiU Maull, Dqwity Cteric 

16-3 
4t5-8 



Public Notice 



Public Nolico 



Trustee's Sale 
2524 Hidden Sbcm Drive, #102. 

Virginia B6adi.VA 
DEFAULT having been ma(te in 
tlw terms of a cert^ Deed of Trust 
dated January 7, 1994, and noxded 
in tl» Clerk's Office (rf the Circuit 
Court of the City of Viiginia 
Beach. VA. in DeedBook 3332. at 
page 1S29, and the unders^ned, 
having been duly a{q)ointed m 
Substitute Trustees and having 
been requeued so to do by the 
holito of the note secured, will 
proceed to sell at {xiblic aacdm bt 
cash on Aiml 30, 1998. at 9:00 
a.m.. in front of the building 
housing the Virginia Beach Circuit 
Court, 2305 Judicial Boulevmd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 23456. the 
prop^y designated as Unit No. 
102 in Building No. 2524 
"Coidominium Plats and Plans ci 
Ifidden Shores, a Cornkminium. 
Phase Hiree." recratied in the 
Ctet's Office (rf the Circuit Cour 
of tlw City of Virginia B^ch.VA, 
Nbp Book 231. at pages 84-90, 
and in D^laration of Ifidden 
Stoes. a Comtominium. nooried 
in Deed Bode 3027. at page 499, 
•id as amended. 

The pn^my will be kM sttb^ 
to all prior liens. eiBonems. 
restrictimis, covraaao, and 
conditicms, if any. of record, or 
oA& mattes which would be 
dhdMed bf m aKwttesiwey or 
imiiectkM (d die pemises. 

A (kposit (in ^itiMI funds) d 
10% will be required of die 
m«;^rful bidder M itae s( ^ and 
sMta^M to te mMie wMia 10 
days. TERMS: CASH. Ite 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
LEASE OF CITY PROPERTY 
The Virginia Beach City Council 
wiU hold a PUBLIC HEARING on 
the lease of approximately 74.5 
acres of City-owned property, 
Tuesday. April 28, 1998, at 6:00 
P.M. in the City Council 
Chambo-: 

a. Approx 47.6 ac. off North 
Landing Road, SW of the 
Municipal Cnuer 

b. Approx 26.9 ac. off Salem 
Ro^ near Highland Drive/Lisban 
Road 

The purpose of this hearing is to 
obtain public comment on the 
leasing of this property for 
agricultural usage. 

Any questions concerning this 
matter should be dir«;ted to the 
Offeeof Real Estate, Room 170, 
Building #2, in the Virginia Beach 
Municipal CentCT. The Real Estate 
Office telephone number is 427- 
4161. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC/AAE 

City Cl«k 

16-2 
lt4-17 



Public Notice 



•raUSTCE SALE 
5581 CMdGuffid Crescent 
Virginia Beach, VA 
In execution of a Deed of Trust 
from Pauline Edwards dtted 
October 16. 1986 and recatledin 
the Clerk's W&e. Circuit Cmil, 
City of Vii^nia Be«:h, Virginia, 
in Deed Book 2587, page 273. 
securing a loan which wu 
originally $70.100.(M. D^ib 
having ocosred in tiK |»ymeat cl 
die Note thereby seci«ed.ttid at tte 
reqoeMof thelnfal^(tf »MNMe, 
die ondexspied Substitute Trwiees 
will ofta fffl- sate at |wblic ^otai 
at the front st^ of the City d 
Vnguiia Beach Circuit Cowdnuse 
Municipal Building 41, near die 
conm of Hincess Anne & Nordi 
Landing, Virginu B^ch, V^pnia 
on May 15. 1998 at 8:15 A.M., 
die imipmy d^cribedin ntd Deed 
of Trust, located at Ae stove 
addK^ and biMy dsoibed w 
Lot 3, Bkxk 0, as Aorn on 



"Subdivision of Campus East 
Townhouscs, Section One" Tax 
Map# 1468-14-9430. 

Tlie pn^jerty will be conveyed by 
Special Wuranty Deed, subject to 
all existing easements, restrictions 
and any odier conditions diat nrmy 
affect title to the property. The 
Noteholder reaves die right to bid 
at the said sale. 

TERMS: CASH: A non- 
refundable deposit of $6,^.00, 
cash or certified ch^k, will be 
required at die time of sale widi die 
setdement and full payment of dK 
purchase price within (15) fifteen 
days from the date of die sale. 
Additional terms will be muiounced 
at the time of sale and die 
successful bidder will be required to 
execute and deliver to die 
Substitute IVusteea memoandum 
or contract of the sale at die 
conclusicxi of bidding. 

This notice is an attempt to 
collect on a debt and any 
information obtained will be used 
for diat purpose. Loan Type: FHA. 

NP983295 

FOR INFORMATION 
CONTACT: 

Nectar Projects, Inc. 

Substitute Trustees 

722 E, Market Street. Suite 104 

Leesbuq. Virginia 20176 

(703)777-3540 

15-5 
St5-8 



Viifinlt Beach Sun, ftiday, April 17. 1998 7 



Public Notice 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

TINA SAUNDERS RIDDLE, 
Complalnwt, v. 

PHILLIP B. RIDDLE. 2576 
Barwick Drive, Durham. Nordi 
Carolina, 27704, Defendant 

CHANCERY NO. CH98-1078 
ORDER OF PUBUCATION 

The object of diis suit is fc^ die 
complainant. TINA SAUNDERS 
RIDDLE, to obtain a divcvce A 
VINCULO MATRIMONII &om 
the defendant, PHILLIP B. 
RIDDLE, upon the grounds of 
separation in excess of six (6) 
months. 

It is ORDERED tiiat PHILLIP 
B. RIDDLE, die defendant herein, 
appear and protect his interest on 
or before May 26, 1998, which 
date is no sooner than fifty days 
after entry of this Order of 
Publication. 

And it is further ORDERED diat 
this Order of Publication be 
published once a week for fotff 
successive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of genoal 
circulation in this City pmerBied 
by diis Com. 

Dated: March 31, 1998 

J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By BiU Maull. Deputy Clerk 

15-4 
4t5-l 



Public Notice 



Virginia: 

The regular meeting of die City 
Council of die City of Virginia 
Beach will be held in die Council 
Chambers of the City Itall 
Building, Municii»l Center, 
Princess Anne Station. Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on Tuesday, Aiwil 
28, 1998 at 6:00 p.m., at which 
time the following q^licatifms 
will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 
1. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Matilda Russell for 
a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from A-12 
Apartment District and 0-2 Of&x 
Disttictto R-5S Residential Single 
Family Distiict on die east side (rf 
S. Kentucky Avenue, 183 fett 
soudi of Bwiney Road on Lot 7-12 
& 13, Block 1, Midway. The 
proposed zoning classificatkm 
change to R-5S is fa single family 
r^idential land use on lots no \ess 
than 5000 square feet. The 
Comprehensive Plan recommoids 
use of this parcel for suburtwi 
residential/medium & high da^ty 
at densities that are comiMibte 
widi townhouse and multi-family 
ax in acccrdaicewidi odier Han 
policies. Said parcel OMilain 
20.996 Kiusefeo. 
BAYSIDE B0RCXK3H 
2. An Oitiinance upon 
Application of O & R, Inc., a 
Virginia Corporation for a Qian^ 
of Zoning District dassificatim 
from B-2 Community Buanns 
District & P-1 ftraerv«ic« 
DistTKt to A-18 Apann»nt Disirfet 
with a PD-H Planned Unit 
Development O^rlay on c^iun 
pn^erty kicmcd at die noidiwea 
inl^KCtkm of Shoe Mveaml W. 
SMtford Road. The proposed 
zoning clasificati(Mi change to A- 
18 with a PD-H overlay is for 
multi-funily bml use at a dmsity 
no gr^te diaa 18 d««Iling units 
pa aoe. The OmpnAxmrnt^ 
r^xMimeods use ot Ms pMcel for 
ni«te^iac% coRMkir anl annd 
reao i BBcafeoBKiva BoB Me !■ 
KMrdance with other PIm 

polteKS. SakI ^cdis ioowlat 
3t00 Sbwe JMve nd amam 
4.039 acres. BAYSfDB 



BOROUGH 
STREET CLOSURE: 
BAYSIEC BOROUGH 

3. Applkatxm of & R. Inc., a 
Virginia Corporation, for die 
discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of a portion d 
Powhatan Avenue beginning on 
die west side; of Powhatan Avenue 
and running between Lots 1 
dirough 4, Block 40 and Lots 5 
dirough 14. Block 46 as shown on 
die plat entided "Survey of Right- 
of-Way Street Closure for a 
Portion of Powhatan Avenue 
Located Between Block 40 and 46 
of Ocean Pat" and reonded in Map 
Book 5, Page 132. Said pared 
contains 35,594 square feet 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 

4. Application of WeldonT, Jr., 
and Gertrude A. Bynis for die 
discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of a portion of m 
unnamed street beginning at die 
soudieast comer of die Norfolk and 
Soudiem Railroad right-of-way and 
running in an easterly direction a 
distance of 163.97 feet Said pmcd 
is SO feet in widdi and contains 
8,198.5 square feet. 
KEMPSVEXE BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

5. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Larry's Impot 
Center, Inc., for a Conditional Use 
Permit for an automobile repair 
garage on the south side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, 150 feet 
mcae or less east of Riddle Avenue. 
Said parcel is located at 1803 
Virginia Beach Boulevard and 
contains 1 acre more or less. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

NONCONFORMING USE: 
VIRGINL\ BEACH BOROUGH 

6. Application of Gearwato' 
Investinent Associates, L.P.. for 
the enlargement of a 
nonconforming use on the east side 
of Atlantic Avenue between 35di 
Sti-eet and 36di Street on Lots 1 
dirough 6, Block 82. Said pared 
contains .1033 acres more or less. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Edward P. & Leslie 
A. Kappes a Conditional Use 
Pwmit for a miniature golf course 
with ice cream parlor at die 
northeast coma of Shne Drive anl 
RedTrideRoadon Lots 15, 17 & 
19, Block F, Lynnhaven Beach. 
Said parcel contains 22,500 square 
feet LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

All interested parties are invited 
to attend. 

Rudi Hodges Smidi. CMC/AAE 

CityClwk 

If you are physically disabled or 
visually impaired and need 
assistance at this meeting, please 
call die CITY CLERK'S OFFICE 
at 427-4303; Hearing impaired, call 
TDD only 427-4305 (TDD 
TclcjAonic Device for die Deaf). 

154 
2t4-17 



Public Notice 



Virginia: 

IN THE dRCurr court of 

THE CITY OF VIRGINL\ 
BEACH 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
Plaintiff V, 

$1,593.00 U.S. Currency 
(Hobbs).CL95-2609 

$615.00 U.S. Currency 
(COTprew),CL97-10 

$1,006.00 U.S. Currency 
(Anderaoo).CL97-507 

$1,750.00 U.S. Currency 
(Godwin), CL95-686 

$850.00 U.S. Cunwicy (Koch). 
a97-2283 

$337.00 U.S. CurrHKy (Knapp). 
CL97-2284 

CL97-3530 $25,900.00 USC 
(BiDwn/Jouungs), Detoxfants 
Order ot PuMkaticm And Affiitavit 
THIS DAY CAME die Attorney 
for die Commonwealdi and moved 
diis Honorable Coun to ftsfeit to 
dw Commonwealdi (tf Virginia die 
above referenced items diat iwe 
seized between August 9, 1995, 
andDec»nber3,1997. 

AN information was made, 
signed and filed wiUi the Circuit 
Court Clerk's Office on each of die 
above matters. Said information 
stated tl« owna(s) of Ae property 
and the last known ad(h'i^es)d' 
the owner(s) at the time die 
Infnrnatkm «^ fited. 

It q^xsaringdut die wheradxjuts 
of the owners is curoidy 
unknown, and diat a roistered 
iet^ has b^n mailed to dttir lut 
known address^, it is katt^ 
ORDERED, diat all pvties ^par 
oa ot btforel^y 20, 1998, anddi 
whattvCT is ^Kessary to protect 
dev ini»i^ n said property. 

It is furdier ORDERED dM 
[^usuant to Sectic» 19.2-3KJ(B) 
of die Q)de <rf Vi^inia (19»), m 
■Moded. Ais Odo'of PuMni^n 
be puUidied Mce a weA far torn 
siK:c^ive iraeks in die Vta:^ai 
BtmASm, tmwsp^^ci gem^ 
cocolaAM in die City of VnUi 
Beadi, 

ENTER THIS 24th day of 
Kterch,lM». 

J. Curtis Fruit. Clerk of die 
C^oiitC^nt 



By Barbara Mundin, Dqxity 
Oerk 

I ask for diis: 

Robert J. Humphreys 

Commonwealdi's Attorney 

By May Y. Gessler 

Assistant Commonwealth's 
Attorney 

Office of die ComnKHiwealdi's 
AttOfiiQr 

230S7udicial Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 234S6- 
9050 

I, Mary Y. Genler, A»istant 
Commonwealdi's Attorney, after 
having first duly swon. depose aid 
state as follows: 

That pursuant to Secticm 8.01- 
316 of the Code of Virginia 
(1950), as am^ded.diat diUgmoe 
has been used without effiect to 
ascertain the location of die albove 
listed parties. 

Mary Gessler, Affiant 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINU 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH, 
to-wit: 

I, Jaye Lee A. Cullen, a Notary 
Public in and for die City aiKi State 
aforesaid, do hereby certify diat die 
foregoing Affidavit of Mary Y. 
Gessler, Assistant 
Commonwealdi's Attorney, wss 
sworn to and subsoibed to before 
me diis 20di day of March, 1998 

Jaye Lee A. Cullen. Notary 
Public 

My Commission Ex{wes: 
6/30/000 

14-2 
4t4-24 



necessvy to protect his interests. 

It is furUier ordered Uiat die 
foregoing portion of diis wdcr be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newqiapca-puUi^ied 
in the City of Virginia Be**. 
Virginia. 

FREDERICK C. JENKS, m, 
OJERK 

KELLAM, PICKRELL. COX &. 
TAYLOE 

A Profi^onal Ct^xxation 

JANICE PICKRELL 
ANDERSON 

300 Bank of the Commonwealdi 
Buldii^ 

403 Boudi Street 

Norfolk. VA 23510 

Telephooe: (757) 627-8365 

14-1 
4t4-24 



PubHc Notice 



Public Notice 



VIRGINIA: IN THE JUVENILE 
AND DOMESTIC RELATIONS 
DISTRICT COURT OF THE 
CITY OT VIRGINL\ BEACH 

IN RE: 

KATHERINE ELIZABETH 
POORE. a Minor 

IN THE MATTER OF THE 
ADOPTION OF THE CHILD 
KNOWN AS KATHERINE 
ELIZABETH POORE 

BIRTH CERTIFICATE 
REGISTRATION 

NO. 145-94-073788. 
REGISTERED IN THE 
COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINL\ 

ORDER OF PUBUCATION 

The object of this suit is to 
notify Steven Wayne Matdiews, 
the putative fadier of the minor 
child, diat a Petition to adopt die 
minor child by Leigh Poore Harris, 
the natural mother of the minor 
child, and Jeffrey L. Harris, die 
spouse of the natural modio', luis 
beenfiJed. 

And affidavit having been made 
and filed diat die last known post 
office address of Steven Waynt 
Matdiews was 824 Rivanna River 
Reach, Chesapeake, Virginia. 
23320, diat mail has b^n icbmied 
and diat die current whereabouts of 
Steven Wayne Matthews are 
unknown. 

It is ORDERED diat die sakl 
Steven Wayne MatUiews, upon 
whom diligence has been used 
widiout effect to ascertain his 
location, affpcar at die abovt named 
Court Ml orbcfweMay 14, 1998 
at 11:00 A.M. and do what is 



VmOINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

ON THE 17TH DAY OF 
MARCH, 1998 

IN RE: AppUcatfoa to Establish 
die Presunqnive Deadi of Chariene 
Penton Villinger 

CH98-864 
ORDER OF PUBUCATION 

TO WHOM IT MAY 
CONCERN: 

lliis is a proceeding by whkh 
die ^>[rikam seeks to establish die 
in-esumptive death of Oiariene 
Penton Villinger. pursuant to die 
provisions of Title 64.1, Quptat 
5, of die Code of Virginia, 1950, 
as amended, Charlene Penton 
Villingw having not been »en a 
head fitim since appRMdnuuely 
September 4, 1989, and your 
q>plicant Donald Kem, Jr. seddng 
to have the fact of her deatfi 
established. 

A hearing has been set in 
Virginia Beach Circuit Court on 
May 21, 1998 at 11:00 a.m., to 
hear evidence concerning die 
alleged absence of Charlaie Penton 
Villinger and die circumstsices aid 
duration diereof and fca- entry of an 
ord^punuant to Secticm 64.1-109 
of die Code of Virginia. 

It is hereby ORDERED diat my 
person or interestol party appai 
and take whatever steps necessvy 
te (sotect their interetts. 

It is further CSU>ER£D diat diis 
order be puUished once a week for 
four successive weeks in die 
Virginia Beach Sun, a new^aper 
of general circulation in Virginia 
Beadi, Virgmia. 

CertifiMi to be a 1RUE COPY of 
record in my cuMody 

J. OiitfiJ^Bi, CMc 

Circuit Court, Vnginia Beach 

By: Phyllis N. Sttnas, Daaaty 
Chak 

Enter diis 17th day of Mardi, 
1998. :\ 

Edward W. Hansen, Circuit 
Court Judge 

I uk for dus: 

Richard W. Whitiemore, Counsd 
forApi^kam 
Richard W. WWoemore, Esq. 

Richard W. WWoemore. P.C. 

3104 ArctK Aire.. P.O. Box 981 

Vi^ia Beach, Virginia 23451 

(757)425-5900 

13-1 
4t4-17 



PRINCESS ANNE ROAD 

~ ~ aod ~ -' 

FERRELL PARKWAY 

City of Virginit Beach 



Location Public Hearing 



Thursday. April 23. 1998 * between 4:0(^ and 7:00|mi 

To be held u the Kellam Higli Schod kicaled at 2323 Holland Road 

in die City (^ Viisinia Beach. 



To |»Dvide you a cbanoe to nfixmaDy review mad discuss |xoposed 
|4ans &r tfie developoMitf of tfac Prmoen Anne RoiiyFeradl PlrinMO' 
from Dam Nedc Road to General Booth Boulevani in the City of 
ViiguuaBeat^ 



Hiere will be no formal preaentation, howevH- you «a be affixded the 
oppcMttmity to m^ both oral and wrten conmenti fer the offidal 
leoonL 

ftfYitWt 

M^»,<b«wn^uidotfierd8tapataflmigtDtbe|Nt9eGtareav«tfaMe 
for your review iatfie VDOTSufRAI^Arictt^BkxIocaledat 1*^)0 
North Main Street m the City of ^ifioBc. at the VDOT NorfoDc 
Reskkaicy office located at 1992 So^ KfiUtary H^iway in die City 
rfChesapeeke and in ^ office of die Direct d Public Works 
kicaled at 240S Court^xise Drivt in te City of Vi^na Beadi. 
To revww the above infiMm^m, reoove additiamd mfonn^ion, <y 
need qiedal aa si s t an c e to mead and {wticqaie in iMs aeetii^ 
plane odl the Norfolk Readeacy at 1 (S8t) 7234^1 (taDftve). 
Device for the Ifearfag Ii^MHvd (TTY): l-«it4a7.4CM 



Wttoea i t i^we n ts an d olhgethiTwtird^ivetoAepiBpoaedpwya 
aMQT abo be submitted to the DeputtMot at M^ time wiMB 10 <hi^ 

Rdocalioo Msslance and teilMive acheUes fy nilt of wa^ aoqw- 
tioa and oQiAradin wfl be disGiMed. 



S^^uro 



IMmlPr4«t:S1T^4n( ) 



^mt 



8 Vifguua B«ich Sun, Friday, A|Hil 17, 1998 



Classifieds 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



PERSONAL 
RATES 

1 time 

2 times 
4 times 



20Wonl« 



$ 7.50 
$ 13.50 
$ 22.50 



Addttlmial 
wonis 

.35 

.70 

1.40 



Run your Classified Adfourtimes for only $22.50. You can cancel 
your ad at any time. 

Ml Classified Ads run in three newspapers (The Virginia Beach Sun, The Chesap- 
ealie Post and The Portsmouth Times) No additional charge. 



Please print clearly using only one word per box. 










■ 






























20 words 



Run my personal ad for . 
Payment is enclosed $ . 



Issues. 



Make ehaek payable to Byerly PiiMicatioiw 
MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327, Chesapeaite, Va. 23327 

Name " ' - . ■' - ■' ■ ' ■ ■ 

Address __^__ 

City , 

FOR HELP with your Classified Ad, please call 547-4571 . 

COMBINATION RATE: Run thk ume penonal ad In any other Byar^ Publlcallont nmnpapar lor an 
addlUonal $3 on* tims, S5 Iwo tlmM, $7 lour tlrriM. Nawspapwt in FtanMIn, Emporia. LawrencevM*. 
Dlnwlddl* and PMwrixirg. Call 547457 1 for OMaM. 



ADOPTION 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



ADOPT We can give your infant 
love and security. You can help 
make us a family. Expenses paid. 
Please call Oee & Pete toll free at 1 - 
888-866-6440. 

5« 

ADOPT - A loving couple wishes 
more than anything to raise your 
newborn with love, care and warmth. 
Medical/legal expenses paid. Strictly 
confidential. Please call LuAnn and 
Jeff at 1-800-710-7778. 

5/1 

ADOPTION: A beautiful choice 
made out of bve and concern for 
your baby's future. Let us help. De- 
voted, childless couple longing to 
share our love with a newborn. Will 
pay medical/legal costs. Judy & 
Steve 1-800-504-3292. 

4/17 



A LOVING COUPLE seeks new- 
born to complete our family, and to 
share its tove, laughter and warmth. 
Stay at home Mom. Expenses paid. 
SOSanne/Paul 1-800-975-5495. 

4/24 



GET YOUR PRE-PAID 
PHONE CARD 

at El-Rey Mexican 

Bakery & Cafe 

towest rates 

to any part of the world 

587-4359 



5/10 



ARE YOU READY FOR LOVE? 

Call Nowl 

1-900-407-7783, ext. 3729 

$2.99 per. min. Must Be 18yrs. 

Sarv-U 619-645-8488 

5/8 

QUIT WORRYING 

8> Call A Psychic 

1-900-659-2222 Ext. 3615 

$3.99 Min. ISyrs 

SERV-U 1-619-645-8434 

http://www.mm02.com/psychic. 
iinnn7Qhtmi 

LOOKING 

For The Perfect Date? 

Singles in Your Area 

Call 1-900-287-0467 Ext.4479 

18yrs. Serv-U 

1-619-645-8434 

http://www.mm02.com/date 
1108079.html 

.^____ 5/8 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



"CUSSY BUCK SINGLES CLUB" 
for ages30/over forming now. Needs 
men/womenfor: Dates-Dining-Danc- 
ing-Dinners-Shows-Trips. Wednes- 
day Nites Club meetings and social 
hours. Friday nites Meet us for "Fri- 
day Nite Jams'. Call our 24 hour 
hotline 367-25% for further details. 

TFN 



GUARANTEED VISA OR MASTER 
CARD. Bad Credit, No Credit. 
Low Income No Problem. Interest 
Rates as low as 5.9 %. Call 1-800- 
938-1216. 24 hours. 

4/17 



Get Sports Odds 

Point Spreads 

1-900-378-5754ext1179 

18yrs. SERV-U 1-619-645-8434 

http://www.mm02.com/sports. 

1108079.html 

To Talk With A Girl 

That Is Just Right For You 

1-900-255-0700 Ext. 4695 

$3.99 min. 18yrs 

Serv-U 1-619-645-8434 

http:www.mm02.com/chat. 

1108079.html 



ANTIQUES / COLLECTIBLES 



COLLECTIBLES & GIFTS 

By-Pass Flea Market, Great BrkJge 
1325 South BattlefieM Blvd. 
Mon-Thurs. 10a.m. • 5p.m. 546- 
1584 

5/8 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



I, Stephen J. Vogel wilt not be re- 
sponsible for any debts unless at- 
tracted for myself. 
3tephen J. Vogel 

4/17 

GUARANTEED ADVERTISING 

RESULTS! Localized on-line adver- 
tising on the Internet Yelbw Pages. 
Free report and info. 24 hours. Call 
545-1020. 

5/1 

FOLK DANCE PERFORMING 
GROUP. Dancers needed. Espe- 
cially men who enjoy dancing at fes- 
tivals and weddings. Similarto Busch 
Gardens Dance Group. Call Mike at 
486-6098 or 486-7349. 

5/1 

ROMANTIC GET-A-WAY Chesa- 
peake Bay sunsets from your win- 
dow. Close by escape in Cape 
Charles. Call 757-331-2424. 
www.ljaysunset bb.com. 

5/1 



INTERNATIONAL COUNTRY 
DANCING. FrkJays, 7:30 at Newtown 
Elementary school. Various dance 
styles. Singles and couples wel- 
comed. Call 486-6098. 

5/1 



Retired Navy Master Chief John O. 
Parmele, Jr., asks for your vote, May 
5, 1998, Virginia Beach City Council. 
Thanks! 4/24 



AUCTION - CHOWAN GALLERY 
Murfreesboro, NC. 

Next auctnn 4/23 - 6:13 pm (919- 
398-8020) B Hill, NC 
#1490,VA#2323. 

4/17 

INTUITIVE READER - All areas of 
life. VA. Beach. 757-463-0985. Sat- 
isfactbn guaranteed. 

5/8 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



PIANO Wurlitzer, mahogany, ex- 
cellent condition, used approxi- 
mately 9 months to practice les- 
sons. $2200 neg. Call 424-1380. 

5/1 

MUST SELLI Double Wide Trailer. 

Already set up in park, owner financ- 
ing available, relocating to North 
Carolina. Call collect. Hal, 704-528- 
0848. 

4/17 



BEAUTY SUPPLIES 



A BEAUTIFUL BODY could be 
yours! Your own! If I saW you could 
have a beautiful body in 90 days, 
would you just call? 473-0473. 

4/20 

DRY, SORE, CRACKED HANDS? I 

have found a remedy for m ine. It may 
help you ,too I Call mo at 631-0716. 

4/24 



LOOK GOOD! FEEL GOOD! Call 
forproductandopportunity. Herbalife 
Distributor. Free sample-Free infor- 
mation booklet. Call 363-7080. 

4/24 



BUILDING MATERIALS 



STEEL BUILDINGS, new, must sell 
40x60x14 was $16,200 sell $9,990 
50x 1 0Ox 1 6 was $26,550 sell $ 1 8,990 
60x1 50x1 6 was $49,990 sell $29,990 
100x225x20 was $98,500 sell 
$69,990. Call 1-800-406-5126. 

4/17 



Service Directory 



ADULT CARE 



CHILD CARE 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 



W)ULT CARE Exceptionally nice 
home. Loving 24 hr. care. Sincere 
inquiries only. CaH 919-539-3680. 

5/1 



CHILD CARE 



MOTHER CX^TWOwiMpfovkte child 
ewe n ny hcNiw, M-F, 6 AM to 4 PM. 
(^efuH, one P/T availabto. Call 548- 
8479. 

5/1 

m^BIONT iMEA - Mom d 1. 
N^jjW/We^wnd <^>eflings. PT/FT, 
Drop-ins, Duty. Playroom, 
ite^xooffl, livge fenced yvd. Rea- 
KNMMi rats*. Call Kerrf , 486-3852. 



OCEANA/REDMILL- SUMMER 

CARE-VA license, CPR, First AW, 
USDA. Pool, Large fent»d yard, 
play equ^ent, fiekl trf>s. 5 yrs.-up. 
Can 721 -3243. 
^ 5^ 

LOVING CARE - in my Sawyers 
Meadow/De^ Creek home. Fenced 
yaid. Infants wekxjme. Call 558- 
195S. 

4/17 

WMI^OR OAKS - Lcenssd home 
dq^ ewe tiMsg before & aftw sctool 
chiidmi only. Pricss rar^from ^ 
to$@«^sk^. CM 631-6748 

S/8 



ANY TYPE HOME IMPROVE- 
MENT. Resffionablelll Quality paint- 
ing, ftooring, plumbing, ete. Call 588- 
7098. 



WATER POLLUTKKI S(X.UTKX4! 

Give your famHy the bs« mim h 
town. Find out how. Call 543-9283 
for a free demonstr^bnll 

S/1 




BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 



COKE/PEPSI 

Best Program in U.S.A 
Excellent Locations 
$1,20O«-wkly potential 
Minimum Investment 4K 
1-800-617- ext# 1106. 



4/17 



RECRUITERS-OPEN YOUR Omi 
BUSINESS within the largest com- 
pany in the U.S.A. & Canada. Train- 
ing provided. Call CRS 588-9170. 

5/8 

ANEW AVON Full tlms/Part tIms 
Rsps nssdsd In TIdswatsr area. 
Earn up to 50%. A fantastic oppor- 
tunity. Call 721-5622. 

5/1 



NASCAR UCENSED PRODUCTS 
BUSINESS. No selling. High Income 
restock profitable accounts. (Food 
Store & Drug Stores) $15,995 Start- 
up required 1-800-221-1984. 



WORK FROM HOME Eam from 
$500 to $800 per month PT/FT Com- 
plete training provided. For Informa- 
tion call (757) 548-2656. 

4/17 

EARN THOUSANDS stuffing enve- 
lopes. Send self-addressed, 
stamped envetope: J& D Inc. PO 
Box 24426, Richmond, VA 24426. 



FREE ! VISION & PRESCRIPTION 

drugs coverage with dental plan. 25% 
- 80% discounts. $15.00 month - 
Entire Household. $9.00 month - In- 
dividuals. REPRESENTATIVES 
NEEDED No insurance license or 
experience required. (757)487-401 0. 

4/17 

AVON! Full and part-time help 
needed. MLM of^ion is available. Up 
to 50% profits. Call 1 -800-565-8801 . 
4/17 

COKBPEPSI VENDING ROUTE 

Many hjghtraffk: sites. $2500awe^ 
potential. Call 800-342-6653. 

5/1 



CONSIGNMENT 



KID'S STUFF CONSIGNMENT 
BOUTIQUE Stop, Shop, save!! 
Make money on Kama no Iwigar 
used - clothing, to^ baby naada. 
Mon - dat., 1 - 6 PM Call 855-5437. 

5/1 



FARM EQUIP /VEHICLES 



TRACTOR ■ 175 MASSEY 
FERGUSON, 60 HP. PS diwel. ex- 
cellent conditton, great for farming, 
landscaping or mowing. $6200. 
Some equipment available. Call919- 
348-2531. 8am-6pm. 



FINANCIAL 



A WAY TO STOP BANKRUPTCY 
Free debt consolidatkin application 
with services. Stop collectbn calls. 
Fast Help. WE CAREI Call 1-800- 
517-3406. 



AVOID BANKRUPTCY Free debt 

consoiidatton w/ applicatbn service. 
Cut payment to 65%. 24 hr. approval 
regardlessof CTedit. 1 -800-873-8207. 

5/1 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



MILTON'S MART/DEU Homema<to 
hot & mikj sausage. All types of 
smoked pork items - hams, bacon, 
Dan Doodles, Whole pigs. Suffok, 
VA Call (757) 986-2721. 

4/17 




BLANKET ALL VIRGINIA 

Ad Network Classifieds are 

published in 78 state newspapers. 

4 million plus readers. 

25 WORDS $225. 

(For more than 25 words there is an additional 
charge of $8.00 per word.) 

Call 04T"457 ■ for Classified Representative 



WOLFF TANNING BEDS, TAN AT homnilat lo diiplay naw maWa- MO-377-3101 loquaWy. 
HOME Buy DIRECT and SAVEI nanca Iraa Kayak Poola Savathou- 

Commarclal/Homa unitt Irom iandaodJUniiiuaoppoilunltyMOO* DRIVERS • LOCAL TRACTOR- 
$199.00 Low Monthly PaymaMt. financing avallabla. 800-510-S924. TRAILER TRAINING -ahopbalora 
FREE Color Catalog. CALL TO- you train and comparal Naarty 

DAY1-8OOB«-13t0. PRESSURE CLEANERS, Factory $1500 laaa than Alllancal 3 waaki 

Ditact SalaMI 2800 PSI $5»», 3200 or 8 waakanda. Shippar* Cholca 
CREDIT CARD PROBLEMS? DaW PSI $849, 4000 PSI $989, 4500 PSI ol VA 1-800-646-2374. 
Consolidation, Avoid Bankruptcy. $1449. LowaalPrioaaQuarantaadlll 

Stop CradHor CaBa Cut Intarasl. FREE catalog. 1-800-78e-9274, 24 Can you dva on $5,0OOWaak. Start- 
No CradH Chack. Ona Low Pay- Houra. Ing m 4-8 waaka. Fantaalw Sup- 
ment. National Conaolldalors, Inc. port. Entrapranaurial Paopla Only. 
(800) 270-9894. Drivar-Eam up to $800 par waak 1-888-310-8S19. 

your Aral yaar wMi USA TRUCKI Www.gpgoollna.comfllmohlo. 
DRIVER.. $30,000 FIrM Yaar Po- Lala-modal convantkxwla wltti lat- 

tanliall Hiring Orivaral No Expari- allHa.noalipaaatlngandwaaklypay. LOVETOSHOPT ISMyalwyitop- 
encaNocaaaarylTrainingAvailabial 800-237-4642. EOE. M/F/H/V. para naadadt Excallanl pay/part 

Naw Pay Package, ConaiatantmSea, Vitm. No a«parianea nacaaaaiy. 

JobStabWty.AaalgnadEquipmant. YOUR OWN TRAVEL AQENCY, to- Call now (888)430-7576 axt. 3324. 
SwHt Tranaportation. 1-800-347- cally. $7,900, finandng avallabla. Pt/ 

4898 (aoa-mrt) Fl.FunlEaayt(Oraal$t$()0uWand- ABSOLUTE AUCTION - Sal.. April 

ing Iravalrtax banafHa. CompratMn- 26,IM-Fann.^AC8i)Uriltyh«na. 
XASH* IMMEDIATE $$ for atrue- alva training. Fraa vidao. MoUvatad Rt. 40 E. Brooknaat, VA. Campball 
turad aaManianla and datarrad In- appHcanta:800-8l1-3SS3axLVA84. County. Call lor dataHadbrodnira, 
auranea clalma. J.Q. Wantwortt) 1 - BHI Bryant, Counia RaaNy li Auc- 

888-231-537S. ABSOLUTE AUCTION-Sat., April lion 1-800-780-2991 VAAF93. 

18tlt. 10 AM. "Crow Harrti Farni", 
LOCAL CANDY ROUTE. 30 Vand- Lynchburg, VA Raal Eatata t com- BILL PROBLEMS? 1-800-408-0044 
lngMacMnaa.Eamap«.$8aa/day. platalinaofmodanifannmaoMnaiy. axl. 1032 9am«pm 7 daya. DabI 
Alllor$e,B9S.Ca 1-800-99e-VBiD. CaH lor brodiura. Counta Raally t conaoHdMon kMna and programa 
AuctkjnCo. t -800-780-2991 VAAF93 avallabla. Bad cradH OK. No ad- 
S$AVON$$ Potantial $200-$2000 va n ea l aa a l Fraaconaullatjon, Non- 

par month Sell where 8 when you NEED A LOAN? Wa can halpl Con- P«o«l. Lower Monthly Paymania, 
like. Its not juit door to door any- solldala CradH Carda. FaatRaauHalll 

mora. Medk»l/otharkiauranca avail- Good or Bad Credit, (888)887-8893. PURPLE MARTIN BIRD HOUSES, 
able, 1 -800-288-631 1 . Ind, Rap, Liberty Aaaociatas, TELESCOPK; POLES, QOUHDS. 

BAT HOUSESI Wortd's Beat 12- 
Aaaamble Arte, Crafta and toya in ALL MALE CHAT LINE privata con- FamHy Houaa, only $29.95, Fac- 
your spare time. Alao aening typ- nadlona, BuNalin Board. (800)778- lory Direct. LHathna Warrantyl 
ing and computer work. Qtaal pay. 6253, $1 .2S/mln. VtSA/MC (900)537- FREE CATALOG. ORDER NOWl 
Gain -800-632-8007. 8266,$1.68/min. 18<.NPPRano.NV. 1-800-784-8688. 

Qrainar Adv. 2S0 Newport Canter 
Swimming Pools $887 New 1997 Dr., Newport BMch, CA 92880. TEACHERSI SCHOOL ADMINI8- 
Factory Lett Over Model's. Hugh TRATORSI 8th Annual Nationai Ml- 

l9X3rX4' Deep. Comes Completa LAKE GASTON VA/NC-Naw 3 bed- nority Careers in Education Expo 
WHh Giant Size Sun Deck, Safety room. 2 1/2 bath, 2 bonua rooma, (pubWc school job lair)... Open loaHII 
Fence, In Pool Ladder, Liner, Fil- central vac. StaracdMiwaahar, range NYC, Saturday, April 2Sth. 873-682- 
ler. Pump & Motor, Installation and w/grill, large deck, boat dock. 8464, axt. 9500 www.DeptofEdorg. 
Financing Available. No Bankrupt- Marrymount Siri)., Ownar/Agent Call 

cy's. Call 24 hrs 1- 800-447-7207. Tanglaaiood Realty, 1-800-338-8816. ABSOLUTE AUCTION, Unhrerslty 
P.O.Box 116, Bracey,VA 23919. Market, Radford, VA May 6, 11AM. 
WOLFFTANNINGB£DSSo«dalaal. 2,400 Sq. Ft. convenlaoca store 

full body tanning beds. New/Uaed FRIENDLY TOY 8 GIFTS haa imma- ad|aoanttoRadlerdUntvaraltycam- 
Flnanclng available. For free cata- diateopeninga In your area. Number pus, Selling personal property also, 
log can: 1-800-S37-9113-(804-7S7 Ona In Party plan: Toys, gifu. Christ- Calllax-on-demand540-344-7297, 
area coda) 1 -800-447-0040-(S40- maa. Home decor. Free catalog and Dec. No. 266 or viaM our web sHe 
703 area coda) Information. 1-800-488-4875. at: hMp7/www.wolt2.eom. Woltzt 

Asaodataa, Inc,; Brokers 8 Auc- 
(X)NATE YOUR CAR. Heritage DIABETICS (USING INSULIN) Did llonaera (VA #321). Call Jonna 
Foriha Blind. Tax Deductible, Fraa youknowMa<»careorlnauranc*eov- MeGraw, 600-851-3588. 
Towing, Free Phone Card to Do- era moat suppHaa? Save Monay-CaH 

norsw/Ad«128S. 1-800-2-Donata. 1-800-234-4070, Ubarty Medical. N. MYRTLE BEACH, SC - Summer 
SatlalactkHi Quaranfaad. No HMO Waaka AvaHablel Luxury, Allord- 
ATW, Inc. Tractor/Trailer Drivata. Member*. aWa Ocaanfront/Oeeanview Con- 

All Teama, All East-West All Hood- doartfcmaa. 1-6 Bedroom*. FuBy 

Condos, Trip Averege 5,800 Miles, Reaplralory proUama? Paying lor Equipped, Clean, Safe Baaehea. 
Top Pay Package 800-948-6723. medications? \«hy? Do you use Fraa Brochur*. Elliott Raally. 1- 

Albuterol (Proventll, Ventolin), 800-525-0225. 
HOMEOWNERScallComfflonPoM Ipratropium (AtrovanI), Mala-. 

Mortgage lodey and gal the caeh protarenol (Alupent), or other nabu- A WONDERFUL FAMH.V EXPE- 
you need. Eliminate high-Interest llzer mediations? Call Expraa* Mad RIENCE. SCANDINAVIAN, EU- 
credit card debt, repair damaged 1-800-290-6442, Ma<«ear* Approved ROPEAN, SOUTH AMERICAN, 
eredltormakehomeimpnwemenla. ASIAN, RUSSIAN EXCHANGE 

1-800-966-2221, DEBT CONSOLIOATKJNI Ovenkie STUDENTS ATTENDING HIGH 

credit card* and other btHa? Maxed SCHOOL. BECOME A HOST FAM- 
ATW, Inc. Owner-Operator Team* out? Reduce payments. .. lower ILY/AISE. CALL l-SOO-SIBLiNG. 
All EaM/WMI. Eam $t70.000 * fl intaMsl...slop eollactlana... avoid WMrW.8IBUNa.0nQ. 
yr 800-948-6723. bad(rupcy...r«*tor*credH...confMen- 

tial. OCCI 1-888-4SS-2227 Non- A BEAUTIFUL CHAPEIAJHURCH 
PRIVACY HEDGE-LaalandCyprMa Profit. Bonded. CHRISTIAN WEDDING. 

(Eyergteen)Fa*tgrowing-Complala GATUNKJHQSORIGINAJ. (SINCE 

privecy. Spring l^uktatkMi. 3 ft.tree/ Drivera - Virginia's Beet Kept S«:re< IWO). PHOTOGRAPHY, MUSIC, 
regular $29.95. Now only $8.95. Keeps Getting Bedarl Great pay, home FLOWERS. LIMOS, JACUZZI 
Qtd and Free delivery- 1-800-908- moat waekerKis, late model conv., SUITES. FIREPLACES, LOVE 
0496. CO PaW health! Coma Grow WHh WALK BRICK. REV. ED TAYLOR 

HARRISTRUCKINGCO. 1-800-829- 1-800-346-2779 http:// 

REFINANCE 8 SAVE $100s EACH 5003 www.gatllnburgOiapala.com 

MONTH. With Today's Low Mort- 
gage Rata*. Consolldala debt, Im- CASH NOWII WE purehaae mod- TANNING BEDS. FInaly. tanning 
prove your home or get needed gagaa.annulHea, and bualnaa* notes. Hdon quaWy tanning bade for the 
cash with FairtMnk Mortgage. '24- Since 1984 highest pricM pM. Frae home. Guaranlead aaMacUon or 
hourpra-approvalt'QukdiCkMlnga eellmalea. prompt prolaaalonal ear- your money back. FINANCING 
Competitive Rata* Cuttom Pro- vice. Cokwlal Rnandal. 1-800-968- AVAILABLE. 845.00amontti. Call 
gram* For Every Need "Good 8 1200 ext, 52, today 1-600-892-5015. 

problem eredil'No-lncome Vertfic*- 

lion •Self employed 'Bankruplcy DRIVERS-ALL 95 OR NEWER LEASE PURCHASE PROGRAM 
•125% Equity Financing We Bend CONV. Sotoa atart up lo $0.30 par AVAILABLE OTR Driver* » Owner 
Over Backward* To Approve Your mHe with bonua, ennual raiaa* lo Oparalot* Conventional Kanworth 
Loan FAIHBANK MORTGAGE 1- $0 35 per mile. Team* start up to EqulpmeolNoDownpaymanl. Ub- 
800-34e-5U6 ext. 562 VALic. ML $0.38 per mile wMi bonua. kiduatry's eral Payback Schadulal SOUTH- 
251 . top mHaaga avg.-aoto « Warn. 90% WESTERN FREIGHT CARRIERS 

no-louGh. Coaat-tOHioaat nina avM. A Division of Bwllngton Motor Car- 
MEDICARE RECIPIENTS are you 23 iMIh 1 yaar OTR. WIIAR 1-888- rtati 1-800-9M-8743, Ext. 141 or 
using a NEBULIZER MACHINE? 216-5^. 125. 

STOP paying lull price lor Albuterol, 

Alrovent,elc Solutions. MEDK:ARE DRIVER: Up to $70O/week ortenu- COOKWARE-ExcilingI Heevy- 
wlH pay lor them. We bHI MEDI- Von pay. Up lo $.35Anlle to atartl weight, dinner party typal 100% 
CARE for you and ship directly to Great homallme. Aaalgnad, al eon- Watade** I Suiglealatalnlaaaalaell 
your door. MED-A-SAVE. 1-600- venUonal Heal. Leaae Purohaa* Op- 7-ply. 17-piace aall At parties 
538-9849. tkxta. BOYD BROS. 800-S43-6823. $1,499 00 NOW $395,001 Free 

EOE. $75.00 cutlery sell UfeUme war- 

DEBT CONSOLIDATIONS. Cul rantyi 1-800-434-46281 

monthly payments up to 30-50% DRIVERS: Company drivan/oamar 

Reduce inlereat Stop collection ope.$SOO-$1000SlgnonbonualVMi, BILLS GOT YOU DOWN? Oat out 
calls Avoid banknjplcy FREE con- Hatbad, dedioMwl akiglaa or Maiiie. of DaMNowflQuk:k over the phone 
fidential help, Genua Credit Man- No expertenca? No problem. Train- loan ralerrala and consolidation, 
agament. Non-profit, llcanaad/ ing availablal BuMar* Trwiwart. 1- AH CtadN oondttkwa accepted. I- 
bonded. 1-800-318-3652. 888-2-JOIN-BT. 800-568-4913. Naional CradH Aa- 

all 



TAN AT HOME. DONT MAKE A 
HUGE mistake. Compare the 
SunMaaler bed to evarytlilng elae. 
You'll be olad you did , Free raksr 
calatog. Financing 1 -800-533-7282. 

STEEL BUILDING SALE SAVE 
45%. No Salesman. Spring/Sum- 
mer/Fal Delivery. 20X30N,24S.OO. 
25X3684,266.00. 30X4084 jaS.OO. 
40X80 $7,760 00. 56X90 
$12,375.00 Several OMiar*. Pio- 
neer 1-800-668-5422, 

SAWMILL $3795. Saw* kiga Mo 
board*, plai**, baama. Large ca- 
pacity. Bast aawini value anywiera 
Free Information. Norwood Saw- 
mill*, 90 Curtwrlght Drive *3, 
AiT«ier*t, NY 14221. 1- 800-578- 
1363. 

HOMEOWNERS WANTEDI Kayrii 
Pod* looking lor demonatralion 



WE PAY CASH tor ownar-fllMnoad 
mortgage*. Why ooNeaffwaenionMy 
payment* whan you can liava eaah 
lodayl Plaaaa call Mid-AUantie In- 
v**«mentCorporatian(804)S72-a882, 

DEPENDS(r), WINGS (r), AduK dia- 
per* at wholaaM pricea delivered to 
your home, MEWCAIDracipiani a ma y 
beelglilelogeltheeeproduaaFRffi 
Cal HomaCare Oalvervd 1 -800- 5*8- 
5644. 

DRIVERS: OTRIorcompanytrucks: 
1 yaar aaperlanoa; good worti IM- 
lory;nolauehli«lghl;diapaactiedhoma 
Friday, CaH for datafla, 800-876- 
3438, WlWam Edwanto Inc, 

DRIVERS: Inlroduoing Iha 30 weak 
lease, Owner/Operator program. 
Ufered: Financing, NoMoiwydOwn. 
CredH RebuiMng, Bad CradltfBMk- 
ruplM* acceiNed. Job placemeni. 



CASH NOWl We buy payment* 
received from amuWea, ktaurance 
set Ba man te . V8I, MMriaa, mlMary 
panaions, aaHar-flnanead mefl- 
gaoaa. buBinaaaraMaa, li#taillanoaa. 
Best Prtcaal 1-800-722-7472. Ad- 
vance Funding. 
www.advancelund.com 

1ST 8 2N0 MORTQAQES FAST. 
Any CtadN Raang. No l^plfora Faaa. 
Eaay PaymaM Plana. OraM Raiaa. 
CaHOiaitaaTgnay at 804-82-0805 
or 1 -WO-ZW-1 3 1 1 . Croaatala Mort- 



ULTRATRIM Loaa up to 4«ba In 6 
waaka. Guara nte e d lo aaa Inerad- 
IMeraBUllaBtoronaiiMaii. 1 FrwE 
weak aupphr avaN^la. H e r bal . Ho 
Dniga. SandtZ le: UNramax, 4878- 
116 Mns«M Anna Rd. 8137 Vir- 
ginia Beach, Va 23482. 



NEWSPAPER 
PRINTING 

Full service newspaper printing by 
Bywly Publications. 

Tabloid and broadsheet. ■ One day turnaround. 

Pickup and delivery available. ■ Check our low prices. 

Free consultation. ■ Call Gary Hamilton, 627-5020. 



■■ 



■■ 



Virginia Beach Sun, niday, April 17, 19^ 9 







Classifieds 



CALL TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 



FLEA MARKETS /BAZAARS 



RIVERSIDE MALL ft FLEA MAR- 
KET 350 CampostBlla Road, Nor- 
folk. Now open Sundays from 1CM 
Call S^g:2M for table reservations 
and additional info. 

4/24 



Pembroke Manor Uhited 

Church of Christ. 

600 Independence Blvd. 

3rd Saturday of each month 8 - 3 

SHOP OR SELL 

For reservatton/information 

Call456-9106 



Dominion Wholesale Pottery 

Conaete Lawn & Garden statuary in the unique "Craftefs 
Mali" Baxter Run Stiopping, 4740 Baxter Rd., Virginia Beach, 
VA. Booth - W03 Craftefs Mall - 499-1 559. 
Home Office - 485-7055 
Internet W^ Page Design 
Call 485-7055 
See our website at httpwww.erols.coin/llb1 





HELPWAMTED 



HELP WANTED 



SERVICE RUNNERS 
American Paging & TSR Paging, 
leaders in the wireless industry, have 
joined together to form TSR Wire- 
less. We are seeking responsible 
individual to make deliveries. Must 
have own car, good driving recoi'd & 
exc. references. If you want to join a 
winning team, send your resume to: 
TSR Wireless, Attn: Ops Mgr. 1 1 6 S. 
Independence Blvd., Suite 109, Vir- 
ginia Beach, VA. 23462. Fax: 757- 
552-0755. Visit our web site « ht^j 
/www.beep.com. EOE M/F/DA/A 

0UT9DE SALES 

Amertean Paging & TSR Paging, 
leaders in the wireless industry, have 
joined together to form TSR Wire- 
less. Positions are available for Out- 
skle Sales Reps. Great oppty for 
motivated individuals who are self- 
starters w/strong communteatton 
skills. Paging &/or cellular exp. a +. 
Exd. starting base salary. If you want 
to join a winning team, send your 
resume & salary history to TSR Wire- 
less, Attn: Ops Mgr, 1 1 6 S. Indepen- 
dence Blvd., Suite 109, Virginia 
Beach. VA 23462. Fax: 757- 
5520755. Visit our web sita at httpV/ 
www.beep.Mm. EOE M/F/D/V/. 
5A!7 

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTOR 

needs dependable indivkJual to set- 
up and service accounts in Tkiewa- 
ter. For More info. & applicatbn send 
SASE to W.H. Wisner, V^AiolesaJe 
Distributors, P.O. Box 117. 
WinM>u(9, Ohio 44690 

BOXCARS/FUTCARS 1 4 Boxcars 
for sale. Great for onsite stor^e, 
offfces, etc. ISflatcars for sale. CouW 
be used for bridges, etc. Please call 
and leave mesage for detaite. 1-864- 
422-1 128. South Carolina 

4/17 

TERMNIX is kwking for self-moti- 
vated people with direct in-home 
sales experience. Call Jim at 596- 
0988. 

5/8 

POSTAL JOBS 

Start at $14.08 an hour plus ben- 
efits. For exam and applicatnn infor-' 
matbn CaN 800-280-9769, ext VA 
153. 9 am - 1 1 pm, 7 days a week. 

4/24 

CLEHCALPart-time. Rexlslehwrs. 
Some computer skills needed. Greitf 
Bridge area. Call between 8 and 1 2 
to 548-7737. 



HELP WANTED MenWomen earn 
$375 weekly pracmsing/assembling 
Medfcal I. D. Cards at home. Imme- 
di«e openings. Your kKal area. Ex- 
perience unnecessary, will train. Call 
Medteard at 1-541-386-5290. ext 
7174-A. 

4/24 




AnribMfoai TrfM 7 Daw A Waal 
1-800-350-i279 



ua4ii 



PETS 



HOMES /SALE 



COUNTRY UVINQ Private 5 acres. 
3 BR 2 BATH Ranch between Empo- 
ria and Lawrenceville. Best buy at 
$79,500. Geoigsf Robinson, Coun- 
try Property Specialist 804-949-7837 
Roblnaonf^alty 1-8(X}-998-8711. 

4«4 

SAWVtR^CREBCLANDINGHic 

3 miles from Camden Courthouse on 
Sawyer's Creek Road. Call Davkj 
Sawyer ai 919-453-4456. 

4/17 



NO-NEW HOMES! We have them 
under construction at all times. Call 
for current information. 919-264- 
33^. Hurdle & Webb Constructnn 
Company. 4/17 

3 BR. 2 BA - EUZABETH aTY 

Remodeled kitchen and birth $49,900 
Call 91 9-^3-1 168. 

4/17 



GOVT FORECLC^ED homes from 
pennies on $1. Delinquent Tax, 
Repo's. RECs Your area. Toll free 
(1)800-9000 ExtH 15385 for cunent 
listing*^ 

4/17 



INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 



BOXCARSff^LATCARS 1 4 Boxcars 
for sale. Great for onsite stors^e, 
offees.Mc. ISflatcars forsale.Coukf 
be used for brWges, etc. Please call 
and leave mes«^e for details. 1-864- 
422-1128. South Carolina. 

4/17 



JOB OPPORTUNITY 



GREAT 2ND CAREERS National 
company seeks a few indivkjuate 
getting ready to retire/separate. Ex- 
cellent income $28-$42,00O/yr. Plus 
working with military families. For 
infen/»w call Mr. Sullivan at 460- 
4010. 
4/24 

LANDSCAPINQ 



EDITOR Experienced news person 
wanted for top post at weekly news- 
papers in Dinwkldie and Petersbu^. 
Must have proven newspaper writ- 
ing, editing, photogr^hy/darkroom 
and leadership skills. Good opportu- 
nity for reporter with several years 
experience to move up. Page design 
skills a plus. Gall Jamie Brown 757- 
562-3187 

TFN 



REPCMTTERS News writer posHtons 
available at weekly newspapers in 
Qiiwiddie, Peterabuig and Emporia. 
Degree in journalism or mass com- 
munk:^kms required. ExperlMce a 
phis. Call Jamie Brown 757^^- 
3187. 

TFN 



PUNQOLANDWORKS-lwlllland- 
•Mpt, ptant, care for, mni main- 
tain a baautful garden for you year 
round!!! Mulch, you pick up, 
$17J9. Dellvarad, ^2.99. C^ll 
^4-74«. 

5/1 



LOST AND FOUND 



LOST - Handsome young, blade and 
whHe neutwed male cat, TAZZY. 
Vcinity of Sparrow Rd. May have 
gotten in a vehble. REWARD 1 424- 
7292. 



LOTS FOR SALE 



LOTS FOR SALE - ELIZABETH 
OTY, Forwt Pmk, Peartree Place, 
Rivemvood. Gene Meads, 919-338- 
6354. 4,^j 



HORSES & CATTLE 



ARENAS AND BARNS Factory 
ExceHent ina>me $28-$42,0<X)/yr. Deals frwn 24 x 36 to 70 x 1 50. Wi 
Plus working wKh miNt»y fivniHes. detvar, can put upL MuM ontor tw 
For interview call Mr. Sullivap«460- April %^. Ctf Da^ m (757) 877- 
4010. »83. 



4/24 



«»»NA1t^Need2experienMd 

or^inatofs. New company in Chma- 
peiriw. Fax on^; 547-4505. Contain 
jMi^Stan^. 

4/24 



ROCN'ERS NEEI^O i^ to $1SAr. 
axperief^td on^ n^ iPf%- N^^ 
Hewi .NC. 919-441-3«». 

4^4 



MOWLE HOMES /SALE 



eUZAKTH CITY - MAROI MAD- 

NE^ SALE AN singltwIdM, ^500 
off. Umledtiflwon^. M Luv ^toniM, 
919-^8-3113. 



OFFICE SPACE 



l»VMafiAKTHCITY»Mrtead 

M/<l. PR^^M^ mi ExMMhw 
CeflMv. tiOSq. PL «d up. CM 91 9- 
3».3«3 Of 919-M1 .»». 



GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS 7fe- 
males, 2 males, parents on premises. 
l8t shrts. $235. Call 671-8858. 

4/24 



HAPPY JACK MANGEMEDiaNE: 

a natural blend of vegetable oils, 
promotes healing & hair growth to 
•hot spote' & severe mange on dogs 
* horses WITHOUT sterokJs. IN- 
DUSTRIAL HARDWARE 4109 
BAINBRIDGE BLVD 

(www.happyiadtinc.com) 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



LOANS! LOANS! LOANS! 

Real Estate, Commercial, Business. 
Low rates, fast service. We help with 
good/bad credit. C. S. Parker & As- 
sodates. Call 757-547-2609. 

5^ 



TREE TOPS - Quality tree care. 
Honest hard work, tow prices. Li- 
censed, insured. 468-0323 

5/8 


NEED A LOAN 







Try oonsdMating. One tow monthly 
payment. 1-800-533-4485. Feder- 
ated Financial Sen/toes. 
4/24 

WMQUESERVICESINC. Ltoensed. 
Let us save you time and money. 
Well arrange housekeeping, chiW/ 
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REPORTERS 

Newswriter positions available at weekly 
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Jamie Brown 757-562-3187. 



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AUCTION SALE 

AUTOMOBIIE REPOSSESSIONS 



BB&T 

Bank of Tidewater 

Life Savings Bank 

Chrysler Financial Corp. 

Autolnfo Finance of Va, Inc. 

Union Finance 

Naval Supply Center FCU 

NN Shipyard Employee CU 

Auto Credit of Virginia 



BY ORDER OF 

Crestar Bank 
Central Fidelity Bank 
N.A.E. FCU 
Signet Bank 

Old Point National Bonk 
Franklin Acceptance Bank 
Consumer Finance Co. 
Longley FCU 



Chevy Chase FSB 
First Union Bank 
First Virginia Bank 
Americredit Financial Services 
First Enterprise Acceptance 
First Marcliants Acceptance 
Guardian FCU 
Navy Yard CU 
Mercury Finance 



First Advantage FCU 

SATURDAY, APRIL 18™, 1998 • 10:00 A.M. 

Approximately 750 Vehicles Expected For Sale Including Consignments 



PARTIAL LIST 



98 Ford Eecort ZX2 
98 Chevrolet SIO XCab 

TnidcL/S 
M Ford WIndstar Van 6L 
97 ChevfoM CavaHer 

Z24 
97 Do<^ Neon HighHne 
97 MHsubisM Min«e S 
97Chevrolet Camwo 
97 MttwiWpM Oalairt ES 
97 Wa S^Ma HS 
97 Chevrolet Cavalier 
97 Foti Ranger Truck 

XLT 
97 Mazda B2300 XCab 

Truck 
97 Do<^ 1500 XCab 
Truck 5LT Laramie 
97 Suzuki SIdektek 

H-Tiv JX 4W0 
97 Nissan Pathfinder SE 

4 WD 
96 Cadillac Sedan 

DeVille 
96 Honda Accord iX 
96 Chevrolet Cavriier 
96 Niuan Smtra GXE 
96 Pontiac Grand Prix LE 
96 Ford ThiMiderUrd LX 
96QeoiMetro 
96 Hyundri Elantra 
96 Ford FiSO Truck XLT 
96 Clwvnrtet 1500 
XCab Truck 4WD 
96 Dodee 1500 SLT 



XCab Track 4WD 
96 Chevrolet SIO Truck 

96 Dodge Dakota Truck 

SLT 
96 Jeep Cherokee 

ClassteZWD 
96 Geo Tracker Conv. 

2WD 
96 Plymoutli Grand 

Wvyager Vtan SE 
95 BIMW 318 n 
95 IMazda Miltonia 
95 Chevrolet Camaro RS 
95 Nissan Althna GXE 
95 Chevrolet Baratta 
95 Honda Civh: DX 
95 Mercury Tracer 
95 Dodge Neon Higlilbie 
95 Geo Meta'O 
95 Toyota Tacoma Truck 

LX4WD 
95 Dodge Dakota Sport 

Track 
95 Oievrolet SIO XCab 

Track 
95 Isuzu Rodeo L5 2WD 
95 Isuzu Rodeo S 2WD 
95 Do<^ Caravan SE 
94 Chevrolet Cavalier VL 
94 Hmida Accord U 
94 NissM Sentra LE 
94 Ford Tempo GL 
94 Clirysler Le Bwon 
94 Chevrolet Cwnaro RS 



94 Mercury Sable GS 
94 Ford ThunderUrd 
94 Piymoutti Sundwice 
94 Mazda MX3 
94 Chevrolet Cavalier 
94 Ford F150 Track XL 
94 Dodge 1500 Ram 

Track 
94 Chevrolet C20 Hl-top 

Conv. Van . 
94 Plymouth W>yi^er 

Van 
93 Ford Crown Vk^oria 

U 
93 Toyota Celica GT 
93 Chrytoer imperial 
93 Toyota Tercel DX 
93 Ford Festive GL 
93 Hyundai Sonata 
93 Dodge Colt GL 
93 Sutora Justy 
93 Hyundai Elantra 
93 Clievotet C30 Crew 

Cab Truck 
93 Ford F150 Track XL 
93 Nissan Truck 
93 Toyota 4 Rimner SR5 

4WD 
92 Chevrotot Cmuro R& 
92 MHsiMsM Diamante 
92 Ford Tempo GL 
92 Mazda 929 
92 n>rd Escort U S/W 
92 Nissm Sentra XE 
92 Ford Ranger Track XLT 



92 Nissan Pathlbider 

SE4WD 
92 Fori Exptorer EB 

4WD 
92 Suzuki Sidekick 

Conv. 2 WD 
91Mnan300ZX 
91 Acura Integra RS 
91 Toyota CoroNa LE 
91PoMiacafaiidAMLE 
91 OMsmoMe Calais 
91 Honda Accord EX 
91 Honda Excel 
91 Ciievroiet 1500 

Cheywme Truck 4WD 
91 Ford Exptorar XLT 

4WD 
90 Uieoki Towm Car 
90 Toyota CressMa 
90 VW Panat GL 
90 Ford Taimis GL 
90 Pontlae Grand Prix 
90 Plymouth Grand 

Vo^gerVan 
89 Ford Mustang 

Com^. 
89 Chrysler Le Baron 
88 Chevrolet CavMer 
87 Mercury Grand 

MwipitoLS 
87 



LE 



GT 



Motorcvidas 
96 KawmM 250 Nb^ 
MC 



BOAT SPECIALS 



94 Maxum 2000 SC Runaboat "20 ft." w/6 cyl. Meicraiser 1.0. & 95 Escort TraHer 
93 Fun Jet Jet Boat "10 ft." w/90 HP Suzuki Outboard & 93 Misc. Trailer 



SPECIAL NOTICE: Sreen eiffonl Motor Corp. will begin Mllinc soiim Mloct traito-in A used car teventery at 9:30 A.M. 
• Salvage A Meclianlcal Problem Vehiclas Will Be Offered For Sale Beginnlns at 9:15 A.M. 



c 



U.S. MARSHALS SERVICE 
97 Mercedes E420 • 88 Honda Accord 



c 



-NEW CAB BEALEB TBABE-IBS — 

Expecttig 125-175 VeMdes From Local New Car Dealer FrancMaes 



J 



eneral 

Public 

felcome 



Inspection Friday • 11 AM-4 PM 

Some cars may be redeemed, added or pulled prior to sole. 

Sale day announcements take 

precedence over all others. 

Cash Deposit required on all 

purchases on day oi sale - ($200-$600) 



All 
Sales 
Final! 



Buchanan Auction Company 

3856 S. Military Highway, Chesapeake 

757-485-3342 



VA/AF000123 






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^ GET SOLD ^ 

On Classified Advertising 
Gail 547-4571 To Place An Advertisement! 





» Vtagsnia Beach Sim, Rriday, >^ 17, 1998 



Young thespians 'shake it up' with stage classics 



By JaiwRowt 

The small elementary school 
stage is cluooed with a potpouiri 
of props, including bowls ci 
idastic firuiis. scrq» of material and 
a long steel pole. A young boy 
fiddles with a bolt m Uie pde for a 
few minutes, then runs off 
frantically in search of a 
soewdriver. 

Meanwhile, a tnidding actor is 
late for retearsal, and director Ann 
Russell Taylor calmly sends 
another student to check on him. 

"Sometimes it's 4 p.m. before 
we get stmed."shc explained. "It 
takes awhile for all of the kids to 
get here because they come firom 
diffnott schools." 

Finally, the children are all 
togetbo-. Taylor solicits the help of 
a parent who agrees to prompt the 
acuas, and rehearsal begins. The 
young boys reel and sing their way 
across the stage, doing a pretty 
good imitation of Elizabethan 
buffoons until one small boy gets 
a little too carried away with his 
acting. 

"William, you're way oveidoing 
it," Taybr gently chastises him. 

William resp^ids with die half- 
smile and twinkle in his eyes that 
made him such a natural to play 
the role of Puck, the mischievous 
fairy whose practical jokes made 
him arguably the most memorable 
diaracterin "Midsummer Night's 
Dfeam." 

Now William and his cohorts are 
rehearsing for their perfonnance of 
"The Tempest." Soon, the stage 
will become an island, the pole 
will be transformed into a ship's 
mast and the boys will have their 
roles as shipwreck survivors 
polished for public perfonnance. 
These kids, dressed in T-shirts and 
baggy shorts, are budding 
Shakespearean actors and nine-year- 
old William is one of the most 
experienced in the k)L 



Health 
Tips O 



■ Virginia Beach Ceneal 
Hospital will offer PMnatal 
Information Night, a one-hour 
walking tour of Virginia Beach 
General Hospital's Kfotho/Baby 
Unit. This class provides an 
opportunity to receive information 
about delivering at Virginia Beach 
General. Classes will be held on 
Sunday, May 3 at 7 p.m. in the 
,V,irginia Beach General Hospital 
Lobby. Space is limited and 
preregistration is required. For 
more information and to register, 
call the AtHome Care 
Maternal/Child Program, 467- 
4037. 

■ Virginia Beach General 
Hospital will offw a Newborn Care 
class on Tuesday, May 19 bom 
6:30-9:30 p.m. in the hospital. 
The newbcnm class is desiped to 
assia parents in taking care of their 
new arrivals. The class oovas 
bathing, feeding, infant safety, safe 
sleeping positions and doctos' 
visits. For more information and to 
register, call the AtHome Caie 
Maternal/Child Program, 467- 
4037. 

■ Virginia Beach General 
Hospital now offers 'Transition to 
Fatherhood." This is a two-hour 
class to help expectant fathers 
assume their new responsibilities 
through self-awareness and open 
communicati<Hi with their partner, 
and bonding with their new child. 
This class will be held on 
Saturday. May 30 from 9-11 a.m. 
The class location is the AtHome 
Care Office, 1450 Kempsville Rd. 
(Oxford Square), Virginia Beach. A 
fee is charged (includes bock). 
Space is limited andixeregistraticMi 
is r^iiired. For more adontrnkm 
and to register, call the Mtaoe 
Cxe Mttemal^^uld Pn^tam, 467- 
4037. 

■ Virginia Beach Goieral 
H(»pital will hold a Breast-feedng 
class on Sabirday, May 9 from 9- 
11 a.m. in theh^tal. A certified 
lactatim amsoltvit will teach die 
damea. The cl^ fetimes 
information on prenatal bie^ 
preparatim, mil^ potaxkM (rf the 
IvKist, taeatt-feedtagpoatioiis ni 
techiwpes, hiOA-toe^^ sdiecMes 
and work issues. For mare 
infofratfoi md M> refiM»', ctf ike 
AtHome Care Mtacmid^CMId 
Pttjgiim, 467-4037. 

■ Virginia Beach Gcsenl 
Ho^tal will offo^an MiatfCtM 
CPR class m Mo^.May 16 
fimi 8 a.ffl.-noM. The ctaM will 
beMAm^AOkmtCmeCMx. 
(Misi ^Bse, UX Kemfm/tte 
Rd. Tte nmjac is d^^ediar 
^w paeMi , pHdpvenSMd M 



William, whose older si^er 
Adrianne will serve as narrator in 
the play, was only six when he 
played the role of Puck as pan a[ 
die Summer Shakes, a local theater 
group that performs at the Francis 
Land House during die summer. 

When he first started acting, he 
was too young to read well so 
Adrianne helped him learn his 
lines. Ifis cfflea* as a Shakespearean 
aoor has really Qken off and now, 
at the s(^histicated age of nine, 
he's ready to take on the part (rf 
Stephano, a clownish butler fimn 
•TheTempea." 

For Taylor, energetic kids, 
poles and Elizabethan terminology 
areall in a day's work. She headsa 
program designed to introduce 
young students to Shakespeare, and 
it's obvious that she loves her job. 
"By the time these guys ave 
grown, we should have some 
wonderful Shakespearean actors," 
she said. "So many people don't 
know how to approach 
Shakespeare. It requires a wlude 
different approach than modem 
drama." 

The desire to train young men 
and women to perform in 
Shakespeare's plays was one reason 
why Taylor organized "Shakespeare 
Goes Elementary" three years ago. 
As the founder and director of 
Summer Shakes, a non-i^c^it 
theater company, she sometimes 
needs children to act in her summer 
performances. It's nice to have a 
pool of experienced, highly 
motivated students to choose from, 
she said. 

Taylor's other reasons for 
organizing die program include m 
endiusiasm for theater, an affection 
for children and die desire to teach. 
She enjoys watching the kids 
discover how much fun acting cai 
be, and she said diat most of diem 
become avid Shakeq)eare fans. 
"I like it because it has a lot of 



child care providers. A CPR- 
registered instructor will teadi 
participants how to perfotm 
cardiopulmonary resuscitation and 
how to give first aid to choking 
victims. This is a non-cotifying 
class. To register and for more 
information call, 467-4037. 

■ Virginia Beach Genend 
Hospital will offer Papaxd 
Brothers and Sisters, a class to help 
ease a chikl's fears about die birth 
of a new baby in the family, on 
Saturday, May 16 in the Virginia 
Beach General's Health Education 
Center. The program includes a 
tour and a film on becoming a big 
brother or sister. The class is 
designed for children 3-12 years itf 
age. Space is limited and 
preregistration is required. For 
more information and to register, 
call the AtHome Care 
Maternal/Child Program, 467- 
4037. 

■ Virginia Beach General 
Hospital offers "Pregnancy 
Fitness" on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays from 6:15-7:15 p.m. and 
Saturdays from 9-10 a.m. in die 
Virginia Beach General Canliac 
Fitness Center at Great Neck 
Square Shopping Center. Designed 
for women after dieir 12th week of 
pregnancy, classes focus on 
strengthening and controlling 
muscles, increasing flexibility and 
improving posture. For more 
information and to register, call the 
AtHome Care Matotial/Oiikl 
Program, 467-4037. 

■ The Diabetes Tieaimoit 
Center at Virginia Beach General 
Hoqiital will hold a support group 
meeting on Tuesday, May 19 fran 
3-4 p.m. in the Healdi Education 
Center, located across from the 
hospital's Emergency Center. Thb 
free SCTvice for people widi diabetes 
and their families offers both 
ediKational and emotional support. 



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"SHAKING'' IT IH>. These young Slnkespearean thespiant will per- 
fonii bi an adapted version <rf 'Hie Tempest" at elementary schools 
thnw^MMitthedty later this month. Swnewill also serve as appren- 
tices dwiiv Swnmer Shaltes at The Fnncis Land House. 



expression," said Craig Hughes, 
who's playing Ferdinand in 'The 
TempesL" 

"John knew who Shakespeare 
was. and we'd read some of die 
children's stories based on his 
plays." said Judy Maravich, whose 
son, a Kempsville Meadows 
students, will play Sebastian in 
diis perfcnmance. But he wasn't a 
big fan of Shakespeare's before, 
and I diink he will be after this." 

The kids were rehearsing one 
recent day at Seatack Elementary 
School, but the students come 
from Friends School, Norfolk 
Collegiate, and Kempsville 
Meadows as well as from Seatack. 
Hieir play, a half-hour ^laptation 



of "The Tempest" will be 
performed at these schools later 
this month. 

Summer Shakes, a professional 
acting group, will also perform 
"The Tempest" and a spoof, "The 
Compleat Wkrs of Willm Shksjr" 
at the Francis Land House this 
summer. That group, like 
Shakespeare Goes Elementary, 
relies largely on corporate and 
individual sponsors and grants for 
funding. 

Taylor, a native of Suffolk 
who founded both groups, was a 
professional acU'ess living in New 
York when she decided to return 
home to Hampton Roads be close 



to her mother, who was sick. 
■ "I thought that I could wwk in 
the 'Shakespeare by the Sea' 
program," she said, "but diat was 
the year Uiat group foWed." So, 
she decided to form her own 
company and in 1993 Summer 
Shakes gave their first 
perfonnance, 'The Star Spangled 
Girl." Since dien, die peribnnaices 
have moved from the 24th Street 
Stage at the Oceanfrontto die 
Francis Land House, and the group 
has concentrated largely on 
Shakespeare's plays. 

"Shakespeare Goes Ekmentay," 
which is funded i^rUy by a grant 
from die Virginia Commission for 
the Arts, began three years ago. 
Other sponsors include Geico, aid 
Cox Communications tapes the 
perfomiaices. 

"And Beach Texaco and Century 
Food Mart have allowed use to put 
penny jars in their businesses," 
Taykr added. 

the students, who are selected at 
try-outs held at each of die schools, 
often become apptcaticesm die 
Summer Shakes program. Some, 
like William, are now old hands at 
this work, while Inand new actors 
and actresses are added each year. 
Performing Shakespeare's pk^ 
with young actors and within the 
confines of an elemoitary school, 
can be challenging. Taylor 
admitted. But she said diat 
Shakespeare's plays are wdl-suited 
for this sort of improvisation, 
since they were written to be 
pofonnedoatdoors and without die 
advantages of modem technok)gy. 

"The Tempest," of particular 
interest to Virginians because it 
was written about a Jamestown- 
bound ship that was blown off 



course and ended up in Jammca, "is 
really one of the most extravagmit 
plays," TaykM- said. "It was written 
not only for the Globe, but at that 
time they were also building m 
indoor dieater." 

But th^ plays often went on die 
road after they were performed at 
the Globe, and the actors were 
probably forced "to do a lot of 
mime" when pofomed outdoors in 
rural settings. Shakespeare cleverly 
adfpedto this, and his plays are 
full of descriptive passages 
designed b set the scene fcH- die 
audience. 

"He was constantly apologizing 
to die audtence, telling them to use 
their imagination and visualize a 
storm at sea and rolling waves," 
Taylor said. "We'll do that here, 
too." 

None of diis should be too hard 
with talented, spunky actors like 
WUliam. 

"I didn't have too much trouble 
playing Puck." he said with his 
characteristic twinkle. "It came 
naturally to me." Taylor agreed diat 
it's still possible to %e"a little bit 
of Puck coming out in William si 
times." 

Summer Shakes will perfmn 
"The Tempest" at die Francis Land 
HcHise at 8 p.m. Thursdays duough 
Saturdays beginning July 9 and 
ending August 2. These 
poformances will be outdo(H^, and 
tlw audioiceis encouragedto bring 
lawn chairs and picnic badrets. On 
Friday and Saturday nights, "The 
Compleat Wkrs of WiUm Shkspr." 
which includes 60-second version 
of "Hamlet" will also be featured. 
"The Compleat Wkrs of Wiltai 
Shkspi^ will be performed indoors 
and seating is limited. 




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VIR^NIA PEACH Him and VIEWS 



TOIhYear No. 15 3SCenfs 




FOP endorsements 

The Virginia Beach Batemal Oiderof Pcdice 
held its April General Body meeting recently. 
All candidates running opposed for the 
upcoming City Council elections attended and 
were given an opportunity to speak to the 
membership. At the end of this special meeting 
the membership of the Virginia Beach Fraternal 
Order of Police held an election and endorsed 
these candidates: At Lai^e, R.L. "Buddy" Riggs 
and W.D. "WiU" Sessoms Jr.; District 2 
(Kempsville), A.M. "Don" Weeks; District 5 
(Lynnhaven). W.W. "Bill" Harrison Jr. ad 
District 7 (Princess Anne), no endoiwment. 



Anniversary lunch 

The Retired Officers' Wives Society of 
Tidewater will hold its 2Sth anniversary 
luncheon at Cavalier Golf and Y^ht Club on 
Thureday, May 14. The social hour will begin 
at 11:30 a.m., followed by lunch at 12:15 p.m. 
The cost is $13. Special guest Jeanettc 
May^rden, founderof ROWS, will install the 
new officers. The program is "Silvw 
Anniversary Celebration" with music by Eric 
Stevens. Prepaid reservations should be sent to 
Lucy Page, 5184 Shenstone Dr., Virginia 
Beach, VA 23455, by Friday. May 8. 



March for Parks 

The March For Parks will take place on 
Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m .-5 p.m. at 
First Landing/SeashcHie State Park in Virginia 
Beach. Held in conjunction with the National 
Parks and Conservation Association, this Earth 
Day event takes place during National 
Volunteer Week. Sponsored by The Frioids erf 
First Landing/Seashore State Park, the walk 
hopes to generate pledges of funds to suppwt 
conservation and reconstruction projects in the 
paik. 

A (noposedintiject is to build a bridgeon the 
Long Creek Trail so that visitors can better 
enjoy and appreciate all the park has to offer. 
Building a bridge-^ %ei^-edBfation In 
(xjmervatkm and knowledge of the oivironmeM 
is also a goal. Volunteers are needed to walk 
and people to make pledges. To obtain 
information, pledge cards and to walk in the 
ninth annual March For Parks contact Jen 
MichKls. 460-1043, or Janice Banks, 363- 
0026. 



Fishy Fun 




The Virginia Marine Science Museum is 
hosting "Fishy Fun for Preschoolers" on 
Wednesday, May 6 from 9:30 to 10:45 p.m. or 
11:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Designed for children 
^es thr^ to five, Uie prt^ram will focus on 
insects through age-appropriate hands-on 
activities mid aifts. 

Cost of the event is $4 for museum members 
imd $6 for non-members. Children must be 
accompanied by an adult (no charge for adults). 
Call 437-6007 for more information anl 
registration. 



Spring concert 

John Rutter's "Requiem" 
aid Academy Awad 
nominees who didn't win 
the golden statue will be 
featured in the Virginia 
Beach Chorale's sping 
concert "And The Winner 
Wasn't..." The concert, 
undo' the direction of Lou 
Sawyer, is on Saturday, May 2 at 8 p.m. in the 
Virginia Beach Pavilion Convention Cema 
Theater. Tickets are $6 for adults and $5 for 
senior citizens and students. Tickets are 
available at the Pavilion Box Office or fiom 
Virginia Be^h Chorale members. Tickets are 
on sale now. Call 486-1464 for information. 



Respite care 

Virginia Beach Comprehensive Mmai 
Health Soinces will ^K»sor a training coiBse 
for individuals interested in beoxning 
Cfflcgivers in the Respite Care for the Bderty 
Pit^ram. To qualify for the tfaining you must 
be a resi(tent of Virginia ^vhand 18 yeais of 
age or okter. Classes will be Mdm July 6, 9, 
13, 16, 20, 24, 30 and 31 from 10 a.m. to 
3:30 p.m. at the Central Library. Up«> 
completion of the 35 hours of tnmiuig. 
csegivere will be assigi^d to Virginia Bes* 
families to aid them in csing {(x tteir ekfcdy 
family members. Hours are flexible ad 
(^^egi^sswill bejmi. Ttoeis $10 ctan^te 
d» CXlTs piesNed by Tidewais C(xnmunity 
College at Uie cwnplctiai of the ttaia^ 
pn^wi. If ^bamtti in Mending this timiag 
aU, 437-61 15. Regi«i«iai bef^ fctay 5. 



City dedicates newf ire station, 
police precinct at oceanfront 




Pholo by Uwk Hail 

CUTTING EDGE. With the snip of a rti>bon Virginia Beach welcomed iu ncwMt 
public tervice facilities on iMonday - the 2nd Police Precinct and Fh« nalioa 
No. 11. Partldpatliv in the ceremony, from left, were Fire Chief James Carter; 
PoMce Chief Charles Wall, Mayor Meyera Obem<forf and City IManager James 
K. Spore. 

Option proposes building 
Bayside Library addition, 
precinct as same project 



By Mark Hall 

Correspondent 

Virginia Beach held a dedkaiian 
ceremony of two new public safety 
facilities near the oceanfiont on Kfonday. 

The facilities are the fire dq»itmait's 
station no. 11, located at 800 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., and the police departn^nt's 
2nd precinct located next door at 820 
Virginia Beach Blvd. 

City officials and members of the 
community gathered at the coemony 
where they were addressed by Virginia 
Beach Mayor Meyera Obemdorf, Pdia 
Chief Charles Wall and Fire Chief James 
Carter. 

"What a great day this is for public 
safety — we feel that our police and fire 
departments are %cond to none in the 
state of Virginia." said Obemdorf. "Hoe 
at the oceanfront, our police and fire 
personnel will be able to re^XHid quickly 
to the needs of our citizens, as well as 
the 2.S million visitors we enjoy each 
year." 

The new police precinct is four times 



as laife (19,500 square feet) as the oki 
IHtcinct (5,980 square feet) and the new 
fire station is api»'Oximateiy one-third 
larger (15.988 square feet) than die M 
fire station (10,2(X} square feet). 

Following the ribbon cutting by 
Obemdorf, Wall and Carter, visitors 
enjoyed light refreshments and took pan 
in a tour of the facilities. 

IrKluded in the tour were equipment and 
f^ility displays along with the officers 
and firefighters assigned. 

Some of the popular interests during to 
open tour were the visits of the Mounted 
Patrol, featuring mounts Archimedes and 
Baron, as well as Ben, the nac(Kics 
(tetecdcMi dog fitmi Ite K-9 Divisicm. 

The fire station was also a big 
attraction with the Monster Fire Truck 
and the 1937 Seagrave Quad, a bdder 
truck diat s^vedwith the dq»rtmaitfor 
many years. 

"The Monster Fire Truck is, by and 
large, the most exciting thing the 

SMPUBUC.I^g«8 



ByLeeCaiilll 

City Council Raporter 

The city staff has recommended 
combining the Bayside Library addition 
with the police precinct project as a 
modified option for the library's 
infrastructure and service enhancement 
program. 

The $15,000-square-foot addition alone 
wonld^have cost $2.9 million. The 
c(»nbined project will cost $5.6 million. 
E. Dean Block, director of management 
and the budget, told council at a budget 
workshop last week, that the best 
approach fw bodi projects, since the city 
ctecickdto keep the site, was to do both 
projects at the same time. He said that it 
would be difficult to do the library and 
then return later to build the precinct 
because of the small size of the site. 

Since the library staff and board first 
presented its needs last April for a multi- 
million dollar program and requested 
council to call for a referendum for 
citizen approval of the expenditure which 
would result in a real estate tax increase 
the program has been subjected to 
numerous financing options. 

The latest options, presented last week, 
would call for tax increases ranging from 
a 0.7 cent tax increase to a 3.4 cent lax 
increase which would take care of the 
mtirepn^ram. 

Council, which aieadyhas a school 
bond referendum on its plate for next 
November, is expected to decide on a 
Ute:aiy refermdum at -the same time. 

Block has suggested using the city's. 
fund balance for the central library 
renovation, which is included in ail 
options, the reroofing/heating and air 
conditioning rehabilitation where needed 
and a new Pungo/Blackwater fa;ility 



which will be constructed with the 
Creeds Elementary School and is part of 
the school bond referendum. > 

Refurbishing the aging infrastructure of 
the city's libraries only would take a tax 
increase of 0.7 cents and would include in 
addition to the central library renovation, 
the Windsor Woods renovation, the 
Bayside replacement with the poike 
precimu replacement, the Oceanfiom 
replacement, the Kempsville renovation 
and the Great Neck additicm. 

Additional options include ttese 
projects, but add more. 

For instance it would take a 1.2 cent 
tax increase to include all of these 
projects (except for the Oceanfront 
replacement, the Kempsville renovation 
and die Great Neck addition) plus the new 
Princess Anne facility. 

A 2.5 cent tax increase would include 
all the previously mentioned projects and 
add staffing and electronic service. About 
60 positions would be added which will 
provide one or two more staff members 
per shfft at more than eight locations, 
said Marcy Sims, library directcx-. 

She said that at present a library staff 
can spend an average of less than two 
minutes per visitor. She said that patrons 
need help with the electronic media and 
find themselves in a more complex 
environment. The cost will be 
$1,018,000. 

The final option would require a 3.4 
cent tax increase and would included new 
Green Run/Salem facility and Sunday 
hours at all branches. 

A "stand alone" project alternative is a 
new facility and staffing for a library in 
the Princess Anne area which would 
require a 0.9 cent tax increase. 

Sm bayside. Pag* 10 




Three cheers for 
Linkhorn Park! 

The new Linkhorn Park Elementary 
School opened Monday at 977 Rrst 
Colonial Rd. The $7.5 million facility 
boasts 75,000 square feet of space 
and will house 750 sbjdents. CJieer- 
leaders from First Colonial Hi^ 
School welcomed students as they 
arrived. A ribbon cutting follcwed. 








Beach celebrates 20 years of volunteers 




By Mark Hall 

Correspondent 

Virginia Beach hon(»ed its city tireless 
volunteers Saturday during a ^Mi 
anniversary celeixation of the VoiimteCT 
Council. 

The ceremony was highlighted as 
Virginia Beach Mayor Meyera E. 
Obemdof and (Mhw city ofTKials honored 
the volunteers with a ^otaxHraddi^ 
dedication for the new Vdunteor 
Recognition Garden at the Muiudpy 
Colter. 

"Volunteers — the city of Virginia 
Beach wouldn't be as great as it is 
without them," ^d Obemdc^. 

The r^ognitkm prden began widi the 
(rianting of a (kjgwood bee in hoiKx- erf* 
Mi^ Russo, {Mogram coordinates «4io 
was the city's fim volume a pp owMd 
by City Council when the coiMuaee 
was bwin in 1978. 

"This dc^wood tr^ is in hmior c( 
Mary Russo. Tliis beautiful tree will 
become a permanent part of die 
Volunte^ R«»gnitMm Gvfen. WithcMt 
Mary's k»ienU^, we woulfki't be hoe 
10 i^kteMe K yeKS." »d Osemdoif . 

Following te^addRs, (X»nilarf mda 
proclamttt(Ni mvking April 18 as 
VduMettC^M^ tey. 



The giffden will be a living poennial 
ganten located dir»:Uy behind Virginia 
Beach City Hall. 

It was designed by the city's Lan(bci|e 
Services Division and will be built in 
phases through public and aypcxaie 
donatKHis. 

Plantings may als) be (kMiaied in honor 
of or in memory of individuals or groups 
of volunteers. 

In conjunction with Vcriimtea' 
Rec(^iti(m Month in April, a ve^^4e 
gmisi will be e^iMi^ied aaoss bom the 
voluniMr gaar&m at the P^dklm Child 
SovMX Center. The audenlsat the oemer 
wd their families will wotk toother to 
plant and harvest the gartten widi 
assistance from the city's ^TKiAinc 

City hbna^. JanMs K. Sjxxe told ttie 
gi^u Md wlinie«n that value of die 
wri^Meito ti^city Ihb be(»me a peat 
as^t, nving the taxiMyws dk^ tfan 
$16 million. 

"Today, it takes special i^c^le M 
voluitee d^v tme. Ycm rep t esem Ae 
^it of te «wiMaky ^M m^tm this 
• grett ctty Mtay." Md Spwe. 

Tkrrag h tte ikitaKiMi of the mam 



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2 Viipnia Beach Sun, Friday, April 24, 1998 



Conhmentary 



A COAT OP GOODWILL 

A sense of community 

Tomorrow a team of volunteers, by 
conservative estimates some 2,000-strong, 
will gather at homes of the elderly and 
disables to take a "lick" at fixing up their 
communities. 

In will be the second areawlde Paint Your 
Heart Out, Hampton Roads — regionalism at 
Its best. Rotary Clubs In all South Hampton 
Roads cities are Joining hearts and hands to 
spread a coat of goodwill. 

Last year's first- time regional effort proved 
so remarkable that this year nearly 100 
homes — houses that otherwise might not get 
the much-needed care they need because 
their elderly owners are on fixed Incomes — 
will be tackled. The result is enhanced pride 
In ownership and better-looking 
neighborhoods. 

Without the support of the volunteers who 
get the grunt work done, and businesses 
which donate the necessary supplies, the 
project would not be possible. 

This is the public's chance to make a 
difference in the lives of elderly citizens and 
toward working together as a region. So good 
luck tomorrow, heart volunteers, as you work 
up a sweat. 

And remember, Paint Your Heart Out, 
Hampton Roads! — V.E.H. 

CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION 

It's your issue, too 

Child abuse is a relatively unique social 
issue in that almost no one questions whether 
it's right or wrong. With abortion, gun 
control, even drugs, you have two sides to the 
coin. But It Is hard to Imagine anyone saying 
publicly that they condone child abuse — 
even the abusers. True, there may be some 
dispute over what crosses the line and 
constitutes "abuse," but It goes against the 
grain of humanity to hurt an Innocent, 
helpless child. 

The Issue, as clear cut as It seems, is also 
one that does not necessarily draw outsiders 
in. People sit by dally across the country 
while children next door are abused 
physically, sexually and emotionally. There Is 
something taboo about sticking our noses In 
another parent's business, even If that 
business is as sinister as harming a child. 

Child abuse and the way our country is 
reacting to It has the strength to change the 
way society Interacts. 

Teachers, who share at least as much of a 
child's waking hours as most parents, are 
advised across the country to never touch 
children anymore. A hug can be misconstrued 
as sexual abuse, a pat on the back can be 
manipulated Into a beating by a money- 
lusting lawyer, and taking a violent child by 
the arm to prevent harm to other students or 
the teacher can be misconstrued as an 
attack. 

And a relatively new danger, played upon by 
children who are well aware of the change in 
society, leaves perfectly Innocent, reputable 
teachers and other adults almost helpless 
against being dragged through life-changing 
court proceedings by children who falsely say 
they have been abused. 

Youngsters have been told for years to "not 
talk to strangers" and are now trained 
formally to avoid contact with anyone who 
does not know secret, pre-planned codes. 
Children are learning to be loners and to live 
in fear of talking to anyone they don't already 
know, which Isolates them from a world full of 
good people — as well as the bad. 

And the saddest fact Is that this Is all of 
necessity. All of this madness was prompted 
by the reality that danger Is present, perhaps 
fired along by the society- altering fear of 
la^^ults. 

As a society where the abuse of children has 
grown to such proportions that non-abusers 
have altered our behavior and the way 
children are raised, we should be horrified by 
what abusers are doing across the country. 
How many generations will it take before the 
coldness leaves Impersonal creatures not 
capable of a hug or fearful of a touch. 



Letters to the Editor 

We welcon» letters to the editor fi-om refers who wish 
to rcfl«:t upon or take issue with other views. That's what 
tfiis {»ge is f(n-, the sharing of opinions: yours, ouis and 
tfiose of om columnists and cartoonists. 

Please share your thoughts with fellow leackn by 
fitting to 548-0390. 

Tte wri^s name, address and telephone number must 
be mclwkd. We do not (nint unsigned letttn. We re^rve 
te ri^ to ^t. Hiank you. 




The next Ronald Reagan? 



By Scott Bate* 

George Allen is the Ronald 
Reagan of Virginia politics. There 
are the political parallels. Both 
men took the helm of the 
Republican party at a time when 
the Democrats controlled both 
houses of the legislative branch of 
government. Both men defeated 
Democratic incumbents to gain 
office and both men left office, 
with their sky high popularity in 
good shape. 

Reagan and Allen possess a 
sunny disposition and infectious 
optimism. They can take apart an 
opponent with a smile on their 
face. 

What to do after public office 
was not a problem for Ronald 
Reagan. Reagan was 78 years dd 
when his term as president of the 
United States expired. He went to 
his ranch and settled into 
retirement. No big question as to 
what to do next. George Allen had 
not yet hit 45 years old when his 
term as Virginia's govemw 
expired. 

Former governor Allen has 
bought a $750,000 home on the 
banks of the James River in 
Richmond and joined one of the 
top law fuins in Virginia where he 
commands a salary that allows him 
to make the mortgage on that new 
home. Is he content to live out the 
last of his days in dignified yet 
very quiet political retirement? 
Don't bet cm it. 

George Allen has been a aeature 
of politics most of his adult life. 
He enjoyed becoming governor of 
Virginia. He defeated the odds by 
winning the nomination of his 
party. He beat the establishment 
and went on to win a stunning 



victwy over the heir apparent to 
the Democratic dynasty Mary Sue 
Terry. 

Allen did not stop there. He set 
the stage for the toppling of 
Democratic control over the 
General Assembly. By the end of 
his term, Allen had ended a century 
of Democratic rule in Richmond. 

The Republic party 
establishment wants to channel tlie 
energies of this political 
phenomenon into defeating our 
current U.S. Sen. Chuck Robb. 
Robb as you will remember, was a 
vulnerable incumbent until Lt., 
Col. Oliver North decided to take 
on the challenge. North was too 
much for Virginia to bear and 
Robb retained his seat in the U.S. 
Senate. 

The Republican party 
establishment is grateful to George 
Allen for slaying the Democratic 
dynasty and ending Ms. Teny's 
career. The Republican party 
establishment is grateful that Allen 
toppled the Democrats firom 
Capitol Hill in Richmond. Now 
they hope that George Allen will 
move along in to a retirement type 
status by becoming a U.S. senator. 

By ascending to the race of U.S. 
senator, Allen would have a 
political stage from which to speak 
out and a very officious title. He 
would also lose control of the 
machinery of the Republican party 
of Virginia and lose out on the 
4,000 patronage jobs that a 
governor can give out 

This is where the interests of 
George Allen the politician and the 
Republic establishment in Virginia 
began to diverge. George Allen 
wished to become president of the 
United States of America. Do I 



know this as fact? Of course not Is 
it a pretty good guess? You bet it 
is. 

During 1996 dien-govonor 
Allen's political handlers woe 
mentioning high as possible vice 
presidential selection for Bob Dole, 
Good thing for Allen he never 
made the short list. 

Allen could go on to the U.S. 
Senate, but the track record for 
Washington insiders running for 
president has not been very good. 
In fact the only sitting U.S. 
Senator to win the presidency in 
this century was Jack Kennedy. 
And that was before people really 
started to dislike Washington. 

So imagine that George Mai 
wants to become president. How 
better to do it than beat the odds 
and win a second term as governor 
in 2001. Allen will fmally have 
the Republican legislature diat he 
always wanted to pass an agenda 
that he can brag about on the 
campaign stump. Democrats tore 
his agenda to shreds the first time. 

He would be out of office again 
in the beginning of 2005, v/bich 
would allow Allen more than a 
year to raise funds and campaip 
before the Iowa Caucus'. What 
could be better? 

George Allen wants to be 
governor again, but the Republican 
establishment including Lt. 
Governor Hager and Attcwney 
General Early wait in the wings 
and would prefer to see Allen move 
up and out of Richmond to the 
U.S. Senate. 

My bets are on the dd 
quarterback, George Allen, to 
complete his game plan and 
running for governor in the year 
2001. 



PHght of hungry hits home 




OffThe 
Cuff 

By Victoria 
Hecht, editor 



On the hit cartocm series "Smith 
Park," which I've only seen twice 
anddon'tparticularly care for.oneof 
the main characters is accidentally 
sent to a starving village in Africa. In 
turn, a child 
from the vil- 
lage is sent to 
South Park to 
live. 

In Africa, 
the South 
Park child 
meets a 
parody of ac- 
tress Sally 
Struthers. 
who has long 
worked to 
telp starving 
ch i Idren 
worldwide. 
In South 
^^^_^^^ Park, the Af- 
rican child 
marvels at 
how Americans waste so much food. 
YaonetowncMld'sfmiilynletvaies 
the Thsiksgivtng holiday with jut a 
single c^ of green beans and no can 
qtOMT. It was South Paik's idea of 
humo'. 

The wfwie qrisocte macfe li^t of 
the fact diatmJUimsof peo[4e «^^- 
wide are hingry. 

I dicbi't think the cmom was par- 
tkulariy funny whoi I saw it, nd 

iK}w. snx tvro rK«nt events, I find k 
even more di^s^ul. 

On Riday evening as I wu om- 
lonplatij^ wtw M he« iq> f(v (ttner 
stncx Evtti MB oat ^ K^m, 1 9ood 
aaing into the frec^. TV tins? 
Stouffer crcjHoed ch^jped hed on 
loatt?BtDTiu»? 

Hie ctek» were nunefOM. 

Hmtedoofbdli^ 

K(^ tte ootjta spmd |Mved 



from h^ favorite chair and stood at 
the screen door staring curiously at a 
family crowding my tiny front pwch. 

There was a father, about age 40 1 
figured, a 2-year-old boy, a 6-year- 
old giri, an 8-year-old boy and a teen- 
aged daughter.The te€n heU a plastic 
grocery bag in her hands. 

The father, sensing my ai^xehen- 
sion, was very polite. 

"I don't mean to up%t or scare you, 
ma'am," he said. "The problem is I 
have no money and no food at b(xne. 
I don't want your money, iMit if you 
have some focxl to spare so my chil- 
dren can eat dinner I 'd ^qmciaie it" 

This was the second time in a mcxtth 
someone had knocked on my door 
for food. 

I looked from fac^ lo face. The 
children and their big eyes expect- 
antly kx)ked t»ck stt me. I raw dieir 
bag was nearly empty with ju9 a 
couple small cats m it. 

"Wait hoe. I'll §o see whA I've 
gM," I told them. 

S^lness — evm ^lame — swept 
ova- me. Here I had bem pondoing 
what expensive frozen meal to beat 
up fm^ dinner aid lh»e peo{4e Ind 
nothii^. 

I have irinQ^ prided myxU on 
having a wdl-suxictd psitty. Just 
the other day whai my btcOm wm 
visiting he maveled a my full oM- 
nets. 

"I Uce 10 dink tte wetM^oKM^ 
food tt) eat for a long tone if ten's • 
iwctow mr," I joted. 

Btt ttM CmUy sau^ on Ae 
poidk «» 10 jite. It w« Ac letf 
woM Mri^ iM in tfie bee. 

I qMddy ^moA a m»l ui my 
lad. ftM ihe cqteHb I r^ieved 

sewri am V «^^M« mi « 
. Ffo m^nw tewed aid 



ready in te fridge, but I did have a 
big family pack of tazen ground 
beef I grabbed that, loo. 

I returned to tl» doOT, where the 
family stood waiting patiently. 

"Here's enough fw you to make a 
meal and then some," I told d^ dad. 
"But all my meat is frozoi. Do you 
have a micnwwive?" 

"We'll find a way to thaw it," Ik 
said simply. 

Before leaving, he asked if I had 
any dialers for the 2-year-old. I tokl 
him that unfortunately I didn't 

Thenteyl^ 

I sat down to pondtt te family's 
plight sid realized they had no (ks- 
sert I m into the kitchen, grabbed 
an unopen box of codcies and c^ned 
thedoOT. 

They woe already teaving te 
ndghbon' doorstep an|Xy-haaded. 

"H^, I've got some coddes hoe 
fa your desKft." I adl«l to them. 

Ilie S-year-oU boy da^ied to me, 
eyes eagR tt te dxMght of swe^. 

"TiMds ma'on," he rakl, grab- 
iMig tem torn my hnd. 

I te^^ Aom te incident all 
Friday n^t and SaOaday. Despte 
all tead and aniMVK^nlitts coon- 
try and Mp we md oversee, dieie 
ne sm peopfe Bi ow own back ysd 
«M wM^ tt> eat It bie^ the 
best 

lxma0j, SoMhqr mom^ was 
food drive dl^f It ctarch. 

Ihv^S coveied so nuy series 
AoKteFoodBa^crf^So^eaSsn 
Vk:i^, koU(^ food bMket dri«« 
Mi mA, I an ei«r n^HU erf te 
needsflf oten. Fn-ioonai^.oneirf 
te a^ bi^ necovdes — aone- 
^^ytocM — ^n'tgMrsniPcd ftiwi 

b te wonts <rf^ odavic B J. 
&«ifa«. wefcone lo te>^«rf 




The Real 
Wortd 

By B.J. SeB- 
»ions, senior col- 
umnist. 



Everything not 
alright with 
Madelaine Albright 

Secretary of State Madeleine 
Albright should be removed from 
•office forthwith. The very idea tet 
she would stick her nose into the 
business of 
the state of 
Virginia is 
obscene to 
say the least. 
Angel 
Breard, a 
damned 
murderer 
and rapist 
from Para- 
guay, was 
executed 
April 14 in 
the death 
house at 
Greensville 
Correctional 
— — ■^— ^^ Center in 
Jarratt 
Albright 
and the world court had sought a stay 
of execution. This man had gone 
through every appeal up to and in- 
cluding the U.S. Supreme Court and 
te execution was carried out as it 
should have been. Gov. Jim Gilmore 
^ould be complimented for not cav- 
ing in from outside pressure. 

What in the hell has the world court 
got to do with what happens in Vir- 
ginia? Nrthing — and neither has 
Albright 

All she has done since becoming 
secretary of state is fly all over the 
world and visit talk shows. She claims 
her reason for intervention in diis 
case is because of her concern for 
Americans who are arrested or de- 
tained abroad. Hogwash. If an Ameri- 
can murders or rapes in Paraguay or 
any other foreign country, they should 
pay the consequences. 

Is Albright saying that it is alright 
to execute Americans in America, 
but not foreigners in America? She 
has never intervened before. Is she 
inviting foreigners to come to 
America to kill and rape us. knowing 
diat we will do nodiing about it be- 
cause we have become afraid of ev- 
ery little rinky dinky country in the 
world? 

We could swat I^raguay like a fly , 
yet Albright is afraid of what tey 
will do when we execute one of them . 
With diat kind of thinking by our 
secretary of state, no wonder our for- 
eign polky is in such a state of chaos. 
Every time Virginia has an execution 
of a foreigner we hew from Mexico, 
Italy, te pope and now Paraguay. I 
realize that there are some in this 
country who would like to see our 
armed forces under the command of 
te United Nations and our courts 
umfer te world court Such great 
patriots as "Hanoi Jane" Fonda and 
others of her ilk would, no doubt, like 
to see some changes in America tet 
most Americans wouldn't approve 
of and apparently Albright comes 
somewhere in that category. 

People of America and Virginia in 
IMUticular should resent outside in- 
twference from foreign counbies in 
our court system w anything else for 
that matter. I suspect that taxpayer 
mcmey is going to help support te 
world court and it should be stopped. 

We could use that money to feed 
te poor, help te sick, stop <biigs and 
build schools. 

Welcome to the real world. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

P.O. Box 1327 
1024 North Battlefkki Blvd. 

CheaapcAkcVa. 23320 

Tekphoiw: C757) 547-4571 

(USPS«60-140) 

Publisher 
Hanes Byerly 

General Mani^r 
RcmWilmot 

EdMoral Supervtaor 
Jimie Brown 

Editor 
Victoria Hecht 



Maaagcr 

UighWaid 

O^podUoB 

LraetuLomex 

The Virginia Beach Sin is pub- 
lished ev«y Riday by Byely Publica- 
tions, Inc., lOM Armory Drive, 
Iruddm, Virginia 23831. PerkxJicab 
pMage paid in FrnkUn. Virginia and 
additional entry offkea. RcMtmastec 
Sendaddrenchangato lOOOAnnory 
Drive, Fnoiklm, Virginia 2385 1 . Sub- 
saqxion Rates: By mail adch^se* 
wilte ^ miles of Vkginia Beach. 
Va., me year. $15.95, two ysna. 
$^.95. Vvginia and Ncvft CaroUna, 
one y^i, $17.85, two yein. $29.30. 
AO othH staes (»M yew, $24.00, two 
yen, $38 JO. P^aWe in advaiM. 

0*« Byerly Publicaions newi- 
pqwn: The Omqi^ke Post. The 
NiMM>^ Tmm, TIm TMewaM 

Tkc tad^endHt M«^^, 7b» 
{XmridAe Monher, The Pei er ib«g 



mtmmm 



MWMH 



Wi l t ^ 



i^^iiH^mmmmgmmmfm Kmmm 



Vii]ginia Beadi Sun, Friiby, April 24, 1998 3 



Guild gathering brings 
people together regionally 




The 

Mayor's 

Report 

Mayor Meyera 
Obemdorf 



Regionalism was the name of the 
game on March 28 at the seventh 
annual Gathering of the Guilds. The 
18th-century Francis Land House 
Historic Site 
and Gardens 
provided the 
perfect back- 
drop for 13 
regional an 
and craft 
fuilds to 
gather. Guild 
members 
from all over 
the Hampton 
Roads area 
were sharing 
information 
and demon- 
strating their 
speciality to 
the general 
public. 

The first 
Francis Land 
to tiBvel to the 
new world in tte early 1600s is re- 
ported to have been a cooper, acrafts- 
man making buckets and barrels. He 
would more than likely have been 
very familiar with the English guild 
system. The craft guilds in England 
in the 1 7 A and 1 8th centuries were an 
important part of thecraftsman's life. 
These guilds were organized to pro- 
tect the craft and to insure the quality 
of the goods they produced. Today 
these guilds could be compared to a 
trade union. 

The Enghsh craft guild system did 
not cross the Adantic with the colo- 
nists. The guild system that has 
emerged in America is now associ- 
ated with the preservation of an art 
form. The guilds in the Hampton 
Roads area unite people with a com- 
mon interest. These guilds are dedi- 
cated to preservation as well as to the 
education of the public. Membership 
in the local guilds requires only an 
interest in the art form. 

More than 500 people from all cor- 
ners of the Hampton Roads area at- 
tended the gathering during the four- 
hour special event at the Land House. 
It was refreshing to see so many young 
people in attendance. Girl Scouts and 
Boy Scouts were busy asking ques- 
tions which would help them with 
their badge work, home-school par- 
ents used the event as an important 
teaching arena and many guests re- 
ceived help on their own projects. 

There was certainly something for 
everyone at this smnual event. It was 
fascinating to watch the Homer's 
Guild boil horns over an open fire 
andcrealeapowder horn. Music filled 
the air as memfjers of the Tidewater 
Friends of Folk Music played dulci- 
mer and guitar. Under the spreading 
"sycamore" tree, the Tidewater 
Blacksmith Guild tai^ hot metal 
on the anvil. 

The cellar of the Francis Land 
House was abuzz with activity. The 



weavwswcieopcratingsevaalloom, 
at once. The lao; makers were busy at 
their bobUn lace piltows twisting and 
turning the thread into intricately 
woven lace. Knitting needles were 
flying as the knittere turned skeins of 
yam into beautiful ^rments. 

A quilt frame occupied a portion of 
the cellar and the quitters nimble fin- 
gers flew over tl« fabric with great 
dexterity. There were smockers, 
nighookers, seamstresses, basket 
makers and needlepoint expms, all 
working on projects. 

Out on the lawn in front of the 
beautiful Francis Land House, the 
Native Plan Society , another regional 
organization, held its annual plant 
sale. They were also eagerly sharing 
information on g^ffdening and on the 
native plants of Virginia 

As always, it was interesting lis- 
tening to the Francis Land House 
c(stumed docents as they provided 
each visitor with a history of the Land 
family and their life in eariy Virginia 
Beach. The seventh annual "Gather- 
ing of the Guilds" was a wonderful 
aftemoon. Thanks go to all of the 
Guilds who are busy each day pre- 
serving the arts and crafts of days 
gone by. 

Following are present day practic- 
ing guilds and their meeting times. If 
you need mwe information or if you 
are interested in any particular guild, 
all Vickie Harvey at the Francis Land 
House at 43 1 -4000 for additional in- 
formation. 

Bet you didn't know there were so 
many present day guilds: 

■ American Needlepoint Guild, 
third Samrday, 10a.m.,St Gregory's, 
Virginia Beach. 

■ High Country Basketry Guild, 
first Sunday, 2 p.m., Larchmont 
United Methodist, Norfolk. 

■ Land House Lacers, fourth Sun- 
day, 2p.m., Kempsville Library, Vir- 
ginia Beach. 

■ National Guild of Pearl K. 
McGown Rug Hookcrafters, still 
forming. 

■ Seaside Smockers, first Thurs- 
day, Providence Presbyterian in 
Kempsville, Virginia Beach. 

■ Southeastern Virginia Spinning 
Guild, second Tuesday, meets in 
Chesapeake, pl^ie varies. 

■ Tidewato- Blacksmith Guild, 
third Sumiay, meeting place varies. 

■ Tidewater Ftkmjs of Folk Mu- 
sic, board meets monthly, concerts 
regularly. 

■ Tidewater Knitting Guild of 
Virginia, first Monday, 7 p.m.. 
Westminster Canterbury. 

■ Tidewater Quilters Guild, first 
Monday (7 p.m.), second Wednes- 
day (10 a.m.). First Bs^ptist of Nor- 
folk. 

■ Tidewater Weavers Guild, first 
Thursday, 1 p.m., Bayside Presbyte- 
rian, Virginia Beach. 

VicU R. Harvey, museum educa- 
tion specialist at the Francis Land 
House, contributed to this column. 



Suspects sought in thefts 
of large home appliances 



Virginia B^ch poUce are trying to 
locate some burglary suspects. We 
need your help. 

Between March 7 ami March 23, 
burglars ent»ed several residences 
under con- 
struction hoe 
at Bierce 
Drive and 
Upton Drive 
in South 
Shores Es- 
tates. 

Burglaries 
have also oc- 
cinred at an- 
other con- 
^nictkxi site 
in the 

Hillcrcst 
Farms subdi- 
vision (fairing 
that same 
UffleporkxL 
Entry has 
^— ^-^— — been gained 
by entering 
the side p- 
ragedo<»s.ChK«inside.kitchen items 
have been leowved, siKh as a Jam 
Air oxric K^. Whii^xml ra^e oral 




Crime 
Solvers 

By Det. Ike 
Ca$hwell. Vir- 
ginia Beach Bo- 
lice Department 



combo. Whirlpool oven wall mount 
with microwave, eight GE miax)- 
wave ovens, seven GE dishwashers, 
nine GE electric ranges and two 
Hunter ceiling fans. 



Crime Solvers also need your help 
in identifying two individuals who 
broke intocustomers' vehicles at 1949 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. 

The theft (xxwted shortly before 
or after midnightm Saturday, March 
14. A surveillaixx video captured 
two while males in a dark<olored 
Mercury Cougar |»rk adjacent to the 
AAMCO transmission shop. They 
smashed in the driver's side windows 
and removed ova S 1 ,500 in K^ wood 
stereo equipment incliKling a com- 

{»ctdiscpkya',an equ^izer,^] AM/ 
FM cassette and a qjedcer sysfaa. 

The suspects se 17 to 20 years of 
age. One was wearing a dwk jacket 
and a white ball cig}, the otfier, a dfflic 
hoocfed sweatshirt and a two-tone 
cdor ^ hat. 

If you can identify any of ihcK 
thKves,con^tCrimeSolvasffiiony- 
moudy at 427-0000. You couM be 
eligibfe f<v a rewwd up to 51.000. 



Up close and personal 

Joann Cooper: % your htaiikl 



By Victoria Hacht 

Being named Virginia Beach's Public 
Heath Nurse of the Year for 1998 was a 
welcome shot in the arm for Joann Cooper, 
who has made a career of caring fw others 
since 1970. 

Before coming to the resort city in 1991, 
Cooper worked briefly in Richmond, then 
with Family Planning in Norfolk for 21 
years. Transferring to the Beach, she joined 
the Communicable Disease Unit, were she 
deals {vimarily with tuberculosis (TB) and 
HIV. 

As coordinator for the city's TB 
prevention and treatment program. Cooper 
oversees a chest clinic and assists the HIV 
clinic. The rest of her time is spent in case 
management, taking her on the road to 
patients' homes and living environments. 

Tliough many people think tuberculosis is 
a deadly killer disease of yesteryear, 
Cooper laments that it's on the rise in the 
1990s. 

"Actually, this week we've seen four or 
five possible cases." she noted. 

She cites HIV, which breaks down the 
immune system, as one reason for the 
increase. Another is an influx of foreign-bom 
people immigrating to the United States 
carrying the disease. 

The push to keep people healthy is one of 
the reasons the Thalia resident went into 
public health. 

"I'm of the generation where you didn't 
have a lot of options if you were a woman. 
You either became a nurse, a secretary or a 
teacher. I like public health because you 
get to see the total patient in their home. " 
The days of the "house call" are not over. 
"You leam so much in a person's home," 
she said. "When people go the doctor, they 
may be tense or keyed up. But when you go 
into their home you're in their environment" 
The conditions in which a person lives — 
often less than ideal — can help Cooper 
make invaluable health care decisions. 

"You can't be judgmental," she 
cautioned. "You learn right away that you 
have to meet them at their level." 

The small thank you's that Cooper gets 
every so often make her work as a public 
servant worth it. 

"I had this guy come in for a TB 
screening and he was chewing on a small 
twig," she remembered. "When I asked him 
why he said that he had a tooth that hurt so 
badly he had to bite down on the stick." 

Though that wasn't why the man had 
come to see Cooper and couldn't afToird 
dental treatment, she went beyond the call 
of dut^ and found a dentist who volunteered 
to hei^faim. Soon after, the man, minus his 
festering tooth, returned to profti^ly thank 
her fw the effort 

"It was so wonderful," she smiled. "It's 
things like that that make it worth it" 

Being named Public Health Nurse of the 
Year makes it even better. But it won't 
change her. 

"I'm just going to keep doing what I do," 
Cooper promised. "I got to this point that 
way. so I must be doing something right I 
love what I do and still enjoy coming to 
woric in the morning." 



Name: Joann Cooper. 

What brought you to thla area: A 

1968 Chevy Camaro. 

Hometown: Born in the Bronx, N.Y. and 
moved to New Jersey at age 10. 

Age: 49 and counting. 

Nickname: Grandma Fish. My grandson 
Alexander calls me this to distinguish me from his 
other grandmotl^r. 




been a public health nurse since 1970. 

Marital Status: Married to David for 
almost 18 years. 

Children: Four: Jennifer, 25, dental 
student at Medical College of Virginia; Helena, 
16, lOtfi grader at Princess Anne High School; 
Brendan. 13, eighth grade at Independence 
Middle School; and Rebecca, 11, sixth grade at 
Independence Middle School. 

Favorite moviea: "Jurassic Park" and 

"The Little Mermaid.' 

Magazines I read regularly: 

Nalional Geograf^ic. 

Favorite authors: Carl Hiaasen and 
Lawrence Sanders. 

Favorite night on the town: 

Dinner and a show at the Thoroughgood Inn 
Comedy Club with good friends. 

Favorite resUurants: La Chambord 
and Steir^ilbefs. 

Favorite meal and bevenge: 

Eg^nt pamtesan and gin and tonic. 

What most people don't know 
about myself: That I tove tropical fish and 
hate irony. 

Best thing about myself: My 

enthusiasm. 



Occupation: Registered njise - have Worst habit: Biting my nails. 



Pets: Two dogs, Shenandoah and 
Savannah; a kitten, Sugar Magnolia; and lots of 
fish. 

Hobbles: Crossword puzzles and word 
games. 

Ideal vacation: A trip h) Jamjuca wtti my 

husband. 

Pet peeves: People who are IqfpocritBs. 

First Job: Playground st^rvisor during 
the summers White I was in high 8Cho<^. 

Least liked Job: Giving multi^ 
immunizations to young chiUren. 

Favorite sports teams: NY Giants 
fan by birth. Red^s fan by nrnnage. 

Favorite musicians: Mozart and The 
Grateful Dead. I thir4( Wolfgivig would have liked 
Jerry Garda. 

Moat embarraaalng moment: k 

must have been so bad that it is btoded from my 
mind. 

How I would like to be 
remembered: As a loving wife and mottier. 

If I received $1 million: I'd ^vel 
the world and leam as mudi as possible. 

If I had 10 minutes on national 
television: I would be tfie spokesperson to 
^nouice a cure for AIDS. 



Multicultural Fest marks 'Harmony in University' 



Tlie Multicultural Festival 
returns to Virginia Btach for a two- 
day celebration of "Harmony in 
Diversity" showcasing artists 
performing traditional music and 
dance from five continents 
inclining an array of ethnic foods, 
hand oafte and folk m 
demonstrations fixmi more than 30 
participating countries fnm Afika, 
Asia, Europe, Central Amofca, 
South America, the United States, 
andtheMkUfeEa^ 
This cefelntion is free and will 



take you around the world without 
leaving Virginia Beach. The 
Virginia Waterfit)nt International 
Arts Festival, Beachevents and The 
Multicultural Alliance of Virginia 
have joined together to create The 
Multicultural Festival. 
Int»nati(mally renowned artists and 
the region's own music and dance 
groups will be on stage. 

Angel Morales, president and 
founder of the Multiculbiral 
AlliaiKe, a aoa-proTn organb.ati<Mi 
devoted to promoting 



multicultural/ethnic arts, said, 
"Woricine losether on what makes 
us similar will help us betlo' 
um^^andand respect what m^cs 
us different and what better fieU 
than the arts to sptseheaA this 
aideavor." 

This oceanfront celebration will 
off» a sampling of food, visual 
arts, performances, handcn^ 
artifacts ami more from over 30 
participating ethnic 
groups/countries including: 
African-American, Arabic, 



Bahamas, Canada, China, 
Columbia, Dominican Republic, 
Ecuador, Holland, Greece, 
Guatemala, India. Ireland, Israel. 
Japan, Korea, Laos, Mexko, 
Native American, Norway, 
I^ttiama, I^ru, Philippines, 
Poland, Puerto Rico. Romania, 
Russia, Scotland. Spain, Hiailand, 
Turkey. lAoaine, Venezu^ 
Vi»raun and more. 

For Multicultural ABiince 
information call McM^les^l- 
3654. 



Play along on your kazoo! Wesleyan breaks ground for new administration building 



Calling all music enthusiasts — 
this is your chance to phy-ilo^ 
with the Virginia Sym|^»y. m 
^ m imim to listen « brag 
my instrument ad play 
"Beethoven's Fifth SymjAony" tt 
the fifth annual pUy-ali^ m 
Lynntawm Mall. Cento Owt m 
Saiaday, may 23 from 1 1:M t.iii. 



to 2 p.m. AssociMe Conductor 
Wts Keamy Md V^inki 
Symphony Chwvs Master Bdb 
Shoup will lead the ontesn. 
There will be raffle for te 
opportunity to conduct Ike 
ORtem^n^ te feftivito. No 
u|*riBBrwte ascMiif .Piy won 
^amMrn call 623-8S90. 



Vi^gfaa W&kym QO^ 
officiab have tpftw^ woric^ 
drawiiip for a new ataMtaHta 
bttihtittf. A ptMHAi^dnf 
cwKMMy for the new facilhy is 
scAeiMedfcv 11 a.m. m 'niadRy, 
^y5. 

Tte aitain^ttK» IwiMing is 
betai iiMifiDr Vh^ua'i fcmer 
two-time fovemor Mills B. 



Godwin Jr., and tm wife, Kadioine 
Be^ Godwin. Godwin has beM a 
n^Bbn of the Virginia Weri^w 
boMd of mme^ niKe the ceO^ 
o^Md, ^ te w» the prix^ 
speaker at the college's tan 
grcNindbr^acing in 1965. TTk 
Godwins have established an 
eiMlow^ Ktetavship at V^pa 
WedeyM in memcvy of ihev 



dai^lMff. Bedcy. 

The 26,900-squve-foot facility 
will botise the college's 
administtative offices, most of 
which are now locate in die 
Hoflwimer Libr»y. The building 
will be kxM»iM the cenwof die 
Vir:^M Werie^ csnpus between 
Aci4einic Village I and Ae 



Virginia W^yaa trials hQ|» 
to a««d a OMttact for te Go4«Mi 
Administration Building in May. 
CoosmicticN) is sdiedukdto b^^ 
this summer. More than $2.6 
million has been anttibnieiar 
frtec^dfcr the new facility mtmA 
isarakipiaedttcoaiHipKM dro M d y 
$3.S nfflm. 



4 Vii^nia Beach Sun, Friday. AprU 24, 1998 



Memorial bike ride raises ieulcemia awareness 



I 




PtaMbyMlikHil 

FAMIlY1RS.J<Mn London posci wtth ton Dr. Scott London before he 
ridei in en evMM to benefit the Leukcmle Society. The Snndey ride 
Ihrowk Nngo wn nemed efter husbend end fetner Jlnuny London, 
who rnd tif the diMOse more then e yeer ego. 



Regent inaugurates new 
president next weel( 



Regent University President Paul 
G. Cerjan will be officially 
inaugurated as the university's fifth 
president on April 30. The event is 
expwied to draw a host of academic 
and military representation from 
around the country. 

Cerjaa, Lieutenant General, USA 
(R), assumed his presidential duties 
last November following the 
resignation of Dr. Terry Lindvall, 
who accepted a distinguished chair 
in the university's College of 
Communication and the Arts. 

Cerjan was a member of the 
Regent Board of Trustees since 
April 1996. His prestigious 
military career includes having 
served as president of both the 
National Defense University 
(NDU), and the Army War 
College. At NDU he reported 
directly to the chairman of the join 
chiefs of staff. Cerjan was tasked 
with educating most of the senior 
leadership of the Department of 



Defense, State and selected other 
government agencies. He m^iaged 
a faculty and staff of more than 
500, a student population of 
approximately 4,000 and an 
operating budget of $24.5 million. 

University Founder/Chancellor 
Pat Robertson and the Board of 
Trustees appointed Cerjan to the 
position with great confidence in 
his wealth of professional 
experience. During his career, 
Cerjan has also supervised an 
organization with 22 separate 
entities, an operating budget of 
more than $950 million and a staff 
of more than 70,000 employees. 

The April 30 inauguration 
ceremony will be held at 3 p.m. in 
the Virginia Ballroom of the 
Founders Inn adjacent to the 
Regent University campus. 
Chancellor Robertson will give the 
induction speech to which Cerjan 
will respond with his inaugural 
address. 



The Teinpest' shal(es up 
Va. Wesleyan campus 



The first four performances of 
"The Tempest." Serpent Child 
Ensemble's bi-linguai, 
international production of the 
Shakespearean classic, will be 
performed outside on the Virginia 
Wesleyan College campus at 7:30 
p.m. April 30 and May 1-3. 

The production features ^ 
international cast from Portugal 



Golf outing 
fund-raiser set 

Sales aoA Marketing Executives 
(SME) of Ttdewatn will hold its 
ffinnual golf outing fund-rai^ or 
June 10 beginning at 1 p.m. at 
Honey Bee Golf Club in Virginia 
B^Kh. A portion of the proceeds 
will be used to fund the annual 
scholarships awmded each ^ing to 
area high school and cdtege 

Hiis year. SME will also hold a 
silent aoction daring the "1 9th 
Hole Celebration" at the Golf 
Outing. Donations are being 
aax^tdtor auakm items, as weU 
as moMtary d<»iati{ms toward die 
SME Scholarship Fund, Hcrfe 
sponsorships, team spcmso^ii^ 
and hole-in-onc sponsorships am 
still available, but on a limiud 
iNuis. The ^allincto register is 
May 15. 

I^ BKMe informattoi about the 
Ofltinf or to donate to the 
scbolanbip fond, coni^t Lois 



and the United States. 
Performances will continue the 
next week at Jamestown National 
Historical Park, May 8-10. This 
production is part of the second 
annual Virginia Waterfront 
International Arts Festival. The 
company will then travel to 
Portugal ffi an official 
rq;)resentative of tlK U.S. Pavilion 
at world Expo '98 in Lisbon. In 
Portugal, the company will 
perform in three Portuguese 
castles: Castelo da Sa6 Jorge, 
Castelo da Vide, and the Pena 
I^dace. 

ShaktsjpeaK was inspired to write 
"The Tempest" by the miraculous 
return of an English expeditiwi 
thought to be lost at sea. In 1609, 
The Sea Adventure was lost in a 
storm on its way to Jamestown, 
Virginia. More than one yew later, 
the entire ship's company sailed 
into the Chesapeake Bay in two 
new ships which they lad 
constructed from the wrwdcage of 
the old, after being blown ashore 
on the as yet unexplored island of 
Bermuda (known then as the Isle of 
Divils). 

The Atlantic Ocean forms the 
g«)graphic, historic and culhaal 
connection between ShidDespeme's 
England, the jp-ett ^a expl(»ers cf 
Pwtogal, and tfB New Wo-ld in the 
Americas. Filled with rfiipwiecks, 
%Uxm%, clowns and castaways, this 
fresh rendition of the beloved 
classic celebrates the nn^time 
hoit^e of Virginia mui its cultual 
liiyalotheOldWwld. 

Call 455-3381. 



Pungo trek 
raises $35,000 
for society 

By Matk Hali 

Corra«Dond>frt 

The first London Memorial Ride 
proved to be a big success Sunday 
with a turnout in Pungo of more 
than 200 bicyclists riding to help 
the Leukemia Society of Amnica. 

The event is named in memory 
of Norfolk resitknt Jimmy London, 
who died of leukemia more than a 
year ago. He was an avid cycUst 
and was a lover of the ootdoon. 

Family, friends and feltow 
cyclists described him to be 
"vibrant and enwgetic — his love 
for the outdoors and his special 
enthusiasm for bicycling knew no 
bounds." 

"We wanted to make a significant 
contribution to fight leukemia," 
said Joan London, his wife, who 
also served as event organizer. "He 
was a passionate long-distance nder 
and he really loved life." 

The three-course event focused on 
areas where Jimmy and his friends 
often rode their bicycles. 

Starting at the Coast Guard 
Station in Pungo, there was a six- 
mile course suggested for beginners 
and families, a quiet and serene 28- 
mile course in the "back coundy" 
of Pungo and Creeds and lastly, a 
challenging 68 mile course through 
Knqtts Island, N.C. for the more 
experienced cyclist 

All three had rest stops, and 
lunch was served at the mid-point 




RACING FOR A CURE. DeifMe the weather, more then 200 bi^eiliti turned out for the fint London 
Memortoi Ride in Punfo. The event wm held to relie money to fight leukemie. 



of the 68-mile course. The courses 
ended back at the Coast Guad 
station. 

One of the participants in the ride 
was Krisa Murray, a graduate 
student at the Virginia Institute of 
Marine Science. 

Murray was riding in honor of a 
friend. 

"I have a friend at school who 
has a fiance^ with leukemia," saki 
Murray, "so I'm riding the 28-mile 
course today lo help raise money. 

Some of the riders were members 
of Jimmy London's family, as well 
as his friends. 



By the time most of the ridos 
were starting to leave, Leukemia 
Society of America special events 
campaign manager Dwayla Booth 
said more than $35,000 had been 
raised to help fight the deadly 
disease. 

At first the weather was a 
concern with m overcast sky and a 
chance of rain, but the coordinmors 
said that did not seem to effect die 
turnout of supporters and riders. 

"We had a fabulous turnout for a 
first event of this kind," saki 
Booth. 

By taking part in the event, the 



Legends ofBeacli visit 



Pirates, witches, adventurers 
and warriors — these are the 
"Legends of die Beach." 

See them legends come alive 
as the historic Francis Land 
House celebrates its 12th 
anniversary as a museum and die 
citv of Virginia Beach honors 
Celebrate Virginia month. 

The grounds of the Francis 
Land House will be the backdrop 
for "Legends of the Beach" on 
Friday, May 15 from 5 to 8 p.m. 

Hear the adventures of die high 
seas with Blackbeard the pirate. 
Visit with Grace Sherwood, the 
witch of Pungo. Explore the 
lives of the Native Americans 
through the hands-on learning 
lab from the Virginia Marine 
Science Museum. Join die 
Department of Afiican-'fthierican 
Interpretation and Presentations 
from Colonial Williamsburg for 
storytelling and music that 
reflect colonial African- American 
life. 

Listen as William "Berry" 
Jenkins gives his "eyewiowss" 
account of the Battle Off die 
Capes. Watch a woodcarver 
create a half-size model of die 
Norwegian Lady figurehead. 
Travel baik to 1813 widi Private 
Luke Hill of the Twentiedi 
Regiment of the Virginia 
Militia. 

CaU 43 1 -4000 for information. 
The Francis Land House is 
located at 3131 Virginia Beach 
Blvd. 




LEGENDS OF THE BEACH. Ben Cherry, portraying Bledcbeard 
die plrete, will tell stories of hi^ seas adventure durtng Legends 
of tlw Beedi at the Francis Land House on Fridey, May 15 ^om 5 
to8p.ffl. 



Upcoming 

E>VENTS 



School, 1668 Kempsville Rd. The 
Wiz is a musical adapted from "The 
WoKferfuI Wizard of Oz"by Frank 
Baum. Tickets are SS in advsKe, 
$6 at the door. For further 
information call 474-8555 before 3 
p.m. wedcdays. 



Grcm Neck-Virginia Beach 
AARP Chq)l»4643 will be hdd 
at 7 p.m. on Twsday, May 5 at die 
Great Neck Recreation CraitCT. 
2541 Shwchavai Dr. 



The Kempsville Area Uhary 
(832 Kempsville Rd.) and die 
Virginia Bc^h Police Dqiartmott 
prraenu a "Youth Safety Fair" fix 
the whole family on S^wday. 
April 25 from 1-4 p.m. Join die 
fun and meet McGruff die poike 
mascot, get yow child's 
identification kit, s« our Crinw 
ftevention and DARE diq>lays, 
l«si a talk about ^ety ai^SM the 
pdice v^Ktes on dis|^y. 



The Virginia Fatherhood 
Initiative, a statewide ncm-profit 
charitable organization focusing on 
issues affecting fadiers and thcii 
chUdien will meet Thursday, Ajwil 
30 at 7 p.m. at Grrenbrier Library, 
1214 Volvo Pkwy. in Chessqieake. 
For more infOTmation call, 545- 
DADS. 



housing residents will par&ipate. 
The housing areas are located on 
Manila, Santiago, P^ific and Vera 
Cruz Roads and Atlantic Avenue 
near the Fort Story Youth Center, 
Shoppers should enter the East 
Gate, next to 89th Street in 
Virginia Beju;h. Items not sold by 
the family housing residents will 
be donated to the Ouklren's 
Hospital of the King's t^n^tto' 
Thrift Store. Fw mwc informatkm 
call Fort Story (^)eraticHis, 422- 
7164. 



The Tallwood High Sclwol 
Theatre Dej^rtment will pRsett 
Kai Happy's "Tlte Wiz" far tae 
pofcmnamss May 7-9. AU AoM 
man at 7 pjn. «ul wiU te fUfsoi m 
the aiKliKMiom at TaDwood W^ 



The Beach Mid-Adantic Regiwial 
Bo(4t and Curriculum Fair will be 
held Friday. May 1 fr«n 5-9 p.m. 
andStturday.May 2 tarn 9 a.m.-5 
p.m. at the Virginia Beach 
Pavilion. Admission is free. TTie 
event caters to homeschoote^, 
public and private school teachers 
and administrators and Simday 
school teadios. For more 
infonnatiai call, 479-0311. 



The Women's Fellowship of 
Lynnhaven Colony, 
Congregational Church, 2217 W. 
Great Nrck Rd., will hold a pl^t 
sale on Saturday, Ma^ 2 from 10 
a.m. -4 p.m. featuring annmis, 
per«inials, terbs, hanging tenets, 
veggie plants and shrubs. A kx:id 
mist will be selling pe6mm. A 
^'UnerGardnowill be avmlabteto 
answo- questions. Lunch will be 
sen^d. 



rides helped raise awareness about 
Leukemia and its impact on die 
population. According to die 
Leukemia Society of America, die 
disease kills more children between 
the age of two and 14 dian any 
other disease, in addition it strikes 
ten time die number of adults dian 
children. 

Prizes in the event were given 
according to the amount each rido' 
raised 

' "We had tremendous coipraate 
sponsorship," said London. '1 
would like to diank them all." 



IHOP helps 



raise cash 

A local restaurant is making a 
generous offer to help non-profit 
organizations raise money for dieir 
worthwhile activities. 

The International House of 
Pancakes (IHOP) at Kemi»Rivcr 
Center in Virginia Beach will give 
these organizations 20 percent carii^ J 
back from their dinner sales on a 
reserved night 

Various organizations, including 
local churches, have already taken 
advantage of the generous offo-. 
"We have raised more dian $500 
for our youdi program," says Betsy 
Rhodes, Minister of Youth at 
Community United Mediodist 
Church. "It's very simple, and 
nicest of all has been die blessing 
of fellowship that we've enjoyed 
on these evenings." 

The KcmpsRiver IHOP designed 
the program, called "Have a Fund 
Filled Nigh at IHOP," to benefit 
churches, PTAs, charitable 
organizations, civic leagues and 
odier not for profit groups. "We are 
excited to be able to help diese 
organizations because diey are the 
ones who do so much for our 
community," says Mohamed 
Boulftali, General Manager of die 
KempsRiverlHOP. 

Organizations simply need to 
encourage their members and 
supportQ-s to eat at dte 
KempsRiver IHOP on a selected 
night, Monday dirough Friday, 6-9 
p.m. Interested groups should call 
424-2738 for reservations or mae 
information. 



from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Players 
must pre-register. Youth from 
various local recreation groups ae 
invit«l to visit with the players at 
Uiis tryout qxjnsOTed by Making A 
Difference Foundation and Gold's 
Gym. For more information call, 
474-1940. 



A Fort Sioiy conununity ^mng 
^dsiJe will be held from 7 a.m. 
to 3 p.m. Sttm^. May 2. Family 



There will be a final try-out far 

he Hampton Roads Sharta 

Football Team on May 2 at B.F. 

Williams Elementary School aid 

Gold's Gym in Virginia Besdi 



A video entitled. "Aspects rf 
Religious Freedom and Amraican 
Public Education" will be shown at 
7:30 p.m. on WwhiMday, April 29 
in the library at Bayside High 
School, 4960 Haygood Rd. The 
video is of a lecture which wm 
presented at Virginia Weste^ 
College e^lierdiis mondi by T)t. 
Ifcmy Willett. faculty member ad 
program director at The Geoige 
Washington University Hampton 
RoatU Ceito'. 

This was Uw fourdi lecture in a 
foir-pat fwum entitted, "Religk)us 
FiBwiom and Political Conflict in 
Amaica." The fonun was i^rUaUy 
supported by a grant from die 
Virginia Foundation for die 
Humanities and Public Policy. The 
video will be followed by a 
di^ussioi led by Dr. Steven M. 
Enim»uel, a^KiM iwrfeMor of 
lAikw^y. 



mmmmmK 



■(■V 



m^wwmmmW'W- ' ^^ 'WI&m 



^mimi 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



Viigoiia Beach Sun, Friday. April 24. 1998 $ 



It's not a private family matter. Every nine seconds another womon is beaten by her husband or 

boyfriend. Aid unless we all work together, it's never going to stop. For information about how you can 

help stop domestic violence, call 1 - 800 -777-1 960. 



NO E X C U b E, 



for Domestic Violence. 



IF RLL THE NORLD'S 

H 5TIIGE. THEN ME 

HOVE THE PERFORHHNCE 

5CHED0LE. 




Call l-800-NCn-8ie8. 

It's not hard, to fincJ cultural activities that >t3u can enjoy, if you kndw 
where to lode. The National Cultural Alliance and our netvs«xk of 
23,000 arts and humanities organizations ^arantee there's sonnethir^ in 
ycHjr confwtxjnity you c^ get excited about. Call for a free btxhure. 



TIE HIS lig IIHIIITIES; 
iiEirs sinEiiiit II II HI m 




G«Mreui M^pert « praMdid br NCA't 








Maiy Davis 



^Jdreutfe 



Neptune '$ princesses named 



The 1998 Neptune Festival 
Princesses have been named. They 
are: 

■ Mary Grace Davis, Frank W. 
Cox High School, daughter of 
Margaret Davis and Clyde Lee 
Davis. Her activities include 
Governor's School for the Arts, 
secretary of REACH Club, Key 
Club, Junior Class Committee 
chairperson. Community Theater, 
volunteer at food shelter and Sugar 
Plum Bakery. She attends Easton 
Shore Chapel. 

■ Jennifer Renee James, 
Kemps villa High School, daugjjter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Keith James. Her 
activities include Varsity Cross 
Country, IndoorADutdoor Track, 
SCA Executive Council, FBLA, 
Interact Club, vice president of 
church youth group and Who's 
Who Among American High 
School Students. 

■ Audra Byers Little, Ocean 
Lakes High School, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Rick Liftle. Her 
activities include Varsity 
Cheerleader, gymnast, SCA 
General Assembly, Dynamic 
Dolphin Award, Gifted Advisonr 
Board Membw, gifted conference 



presenter and delegate. Math an! 
Science Magnet School. She 
attends St. Michael Luthoai 
Church. 

■ Lauren Kathoine Polino, First 
Colonial High School, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Polino. Her 
activities include Junior Class 
histprian, yearbook editor, French 
Honor Society, Linkhom Parte 
Elementary Volunteer Froich 
Teacher, chairman of SCA dances, 
SCA and Junior Class Executive 
Councils. 

■ Joy Lynn Scott, Green Run 
High School, daughter of Eh^. and 
Mrs. Oscar Scott. Her activities 
include Honor Roll, 
Gifted/Achievers Program, 
National Honor Society, SCA, 
Drama Forensics, Students 
Teaching with Technology, Black 
Culture Club and Crime Solvers. 

■ Peggy Chi-Pei Tseng, Frank 
W. Cox High School, daughtwcrf 
Mr. and Nfrs. Stanley F. Tseng. 
Her activities include National 
Honor Society, French Honor 
Society, vice president Hapjpy 
Club, 1999 Executive Council, 
Homecoming Court, piano, 
president of youth group and 




Lauren Poino 

secfMary of ModelUN Society. 

■ SteCuiie Ann W(»g. Sakm 
High SdKxd. daugtnerof Dr. ni 
ivirs. jonaum Woi^. net 
activities include Junior Claas 
histOTian, National Honor Society. 
Gifted Program, Multicultural 
Club, French Club, FUipino 
American Cultural Society. 
Distributive Education Clubs of 
America and Medical Soci^. 




Joy Scott 



Peggy Tseng 



stersnie Wong 



Marine Science Museum adds 
green sea turtle to collection 



The Virginia Marine Science 
Museum will add a green sea turtle 
to its cuirnit sea turtle collection. 

The turtle will arrive at the 
museum this week from die 
National Aquarium in Washington, 
D.C. where he has lived for die 
past nine years. Originally, die 
turtle was given to die ^uarium by 
U.S. Cusumis officials after being 
confiscated in 1989. 

Rarely seen in the waters of 
Virginia, Uie green sea turtle will 
mark die third species iqxesenled 
in the Virginia Marine Science 
Museum's 70,000-gallon sea tirtle 
habitat The aquarium replicates the 
Chesapeake Bay Light Tower 
located ai^noximalely 13 miles off 
shcxe. 

The Uink currendy houses eight 
loggerhead and two Kemps ridleys 
sea turtles. Upon arrival at the 
museum, die turtle will go Uirough 
a ^andard 30-d^ qt»»ttine process 
fcK close moniumng vxi evaluation 
before being added to die 
cdlection. 

"We arc very excited about die 
acquisition and being able to 
provide a suitable home for die 
gr^n sea turtle," says Miik 
Swingle, curtto- of acquisitirais fior 
the museum. 

"Five of the world's seven 
specie of sea turtles have been 
found in Virginia. With this 
acquisition, tN; museum will now 
have ihr^ qiecies nqveaaMtive of 
Virginia fauu for visi^ to §Bt 
BidappRcaaie." 

C. Mac Rawls, executi\«(faeoDr 
<d die moa^n aiUs,1¥Mn(Ming a* 
better aadM-staading and 
amervadoo (rf tea M^ are aome 
(rf te ^tfa of tke nuran's Uve 
animal coU^tkM and a^jpo rt in g 

NMidte *e eolsr of diar body 
AiiiiMrteBtteAell, gre^n 



turUes iue dark brown acceniedby a 
pattern of even darker slwll 
markings. Historically hunted for 
dieir ediUe meat, die qiecies is one 
of die most highly valued marine 
turtles. Consequently, diey have 
been intensely harvested rating 
in depleted populations. It is 
diought diat the gmn fat lends a 
uniqtK flavor to Uie meat. Hie 
species is listed as "direatened''ai 
the U.S. List of Emiffiigered and 
Threatenel Wildlife mid Pisits. 

The green sea tmtle is found in 
the Atlantic Ocean from New 
England to Argentina including die 
Gulf of Mexico and CariU)ean. In 
Virginia, the animal is rare, 
occurring occasionally doing 
sumn^'. Most sightings from New 
England and the Middle A^toic 
states are of juveniles, as they leni 
to wamler further from the tropics 
than do adults. Adults may leach 
300 pounds while juveniles in 
Virginia weigh less than 100 



pounds. 

Green sea turtles lay eggs ihxn 
March to October primarily on 
beaches in the West Indies, die 
Caribbean shores of South and 
Central Amoica, and on die Dry 
Tortugas. Occasionally, nesting 
occurs on die coasts of die Gulf erf 
Mexico, Florida and Bermuda. 
NcHinally coming ashwe only to 
nest. green turtles have 
occaskxially been seen 'liauled out" 
l»dcing in die tnpcs. 

Although green sea turdes 
underlie Imig oceanic migrations, 
they feed in shallow ueas, 
particularly in die vicinity of sea 
grass b^s. Adults feed heavily on 
die submerged sea grass, Thall^sia 
and other marine plants. It is 
thought that this i^am-eitting 
lifestyle is die cause of the green 
body fat In ccHitrast, juveniles mc 
more omnivorous eating jellyfish, 
moUusks and crustaceans in 
wklitoi to plffius. 



'Meet A Museum Curator' soon 



E\^ wonderwhat it takes to nn 
a large aquarium and mus»im? 
Who diinks up, creues and buiUs 
the exhibits? You can And oia 
during Meet A Nbaeum Osmot, 
an insightful program $tom 
exhibit development and liie 
various elements which go into 
running an aquaritun uid musewn. 
Hosted by the Virginia IMm 
ScwaceMn»ni, the pn^i^ will 
be heidm TtandQf.MiV 14 fion 
6:30 to 8 p.m. in the iwbmm'i 
mttilNBhtti^. 

Meet A Museum C^aor 
mdndM a Uiv of Oe o^bmi's 
nUM h^l^M, M well « 
uec^oiM aboM tte Am>^ 



operaion (tf a Mioaalty rec^^u^cu 
aquarium and marine aooce. 
facility. Maylon White, hwi 
civator of the Vi^nia Marme 
Science Ktoram for more dian 10 
years, will leiri tke tour ad 



R^^MiM to n^redudcBB 
be BMMlel^ criMi« 4374007. Ite 
cott of Ike pa^tm to $S fa 
BMttbai and S8 for non-memben. 
Tfae fsogimk is Untied U) 20 






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dira^ ISaMNite 

tqrai 



10 



i Virginia BeKh Sun, Friday. April 24, 1998 




Pholo by Mark Nail 



CHIEF CONCERNS. Virginia Beacii Police Chief Charles Wall addresses public officials and guests at the 
Monday dedication of the 2nd Police Precinct located near the oceanfront 



Public safety facilities dedicated 



Continuod From Page 1 

the chUdren in oiir school system 
have to deal with," said Obemdorf . 

Items and equipment on display 
included fire trucks and related 
apparatus, police cars, police Jet- 
Skis, All Terrain Vehicles, 
motorcycles mid bicycles. 

Obemdorf also recognized and 
wished Second Police Precinct 
commander Capt. JamesCerveraa 
happy anniversary for 22 years of 
outstanding service in the 
department 

Some of the enhancements to the 
new police precinct facility include, 
17 closed circuit security cameras. 



electronic security system, a sally 
port garage with automatic (kxx°s, 
four horse stalls for the mounted 
patrol, motorcycle and bicycle 
garage, gym and weight room, 
officers computer and paperwork 
room, library and showers. 

According to the police 
department, statistics fcM- the second 
precinct include more calls for 
service answered, more arrests, 
process more felons and clear mare 
cases than any other precinct in 
Virginia beach 

Some of the new oihancements 
to the new fire station no. 11 
include a vehicle exhaust removal 
system, fibre optic link to the 



city's wide area network, 
decontamination facility, sprinkler 
system and smoke and caiton 
monoxide monitors. 

Other accommodations at the 
new station no. 11 are a kitchen, 
study training room and sleeping 
quarters for the firefighters. 

Prior locations of station no. 1 1 
have been at 24 th and Pacific 
Avenues in 1925 and, for the past 
60 years, Arctic Ave. 

Station no. 1 1 also brought two 
special items of memorabilia fiom 
the old station; the original brass 
pole and the Claxton alarm bell 
will be mounted as a symbol of 
days to remember. 



20 years of volunteers 



ContlnuMi From Pag« 1 

more than 10,000 city voluntCCTS 
in Virginia Beach, more than 1.5 
million hours of service have beoi 
donated at a cost savings of mote 
than $16.7 million dollars in FY 
96/97. 

"If it were not for the $16 
million dollars that were saved, our 
taxes would be the highest in the 



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metropolitan area if it were not fw 
volunieerism," said Spore. "Ova- 
the years this garden will grow — 
just think how beautiful it will be 
20 years from now." 

Russo said response from 
citizens willing to volunteer is a 
good example of what makes 
Virginia Beach "the great city it is. 

"The citizens are so wonderful in 
their response to our request for 
help. It is these wonderful people 
who volunteer to make this die 
best city in the world," said Russo. 

She became the city's first 
volunteer appointed by City 
Council to serve as the volunteer 
coordinator. 

Today, Russo has served in this 
lea(tership role for 15 of die 20-year 
history of die council. 

The event was also highlighted 
with refreshments and 
entertainment. Composer and 
musician Larry Van Nostrand sang 
the volunteer anthem, 'Thank You, 
Virginia Beach Volunteers," which 
included a sing along. 

The Volunteer Council conceiX 
began in October 1977 when the 
City Council established die 
Mayor's Committee on the Use of 
Volunteers to determine if citizen 
volunteers could be mc«e 
effectively used within city 
agencies. 

In May 1978 council 
unanimously adopted a final report 



of the Mayor's Committee and 
created the Volunteer Council as an 
umbrella organization to provide 
support for departmental volunteer 
programs. 

The largest city volunteer 
programs include the all voluntea- 
Emergency Medical Services rescue 
squads with over 600,000 hours 
donated annually at a value (^ 
nearly $8 million and the Virginia 
Beach Sheriffs Office with over 
450,000 hours donated at a value of 
$3.6 million. 

Additionally, 1 1 other dqiart- 
ments and agencies have donated 
hours valued at more dian 
$100,000 each annually. 

Since 1978, the number of 
volunteers have grown from 
approximately 1,000 to more dian 
10,000. 



Council of the City of Virginia 
Beach will be held in the Council 
Chambers of the City IM 
Building, Municipal Center, 
Princess Anne Station, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on Tuesday, May 
12, 1998 at 2:00 p.m., at which 
time the following applications 
will be heard: 
NONCONFORMING USE: 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH 

1. Application of S.A.S. 
Associates for the conversion of a 
nonconforming use on c»tain 
property located at the northeast 
corner of Atlantic Avenue and 
Laskin Road. Said parcel contains 
18,750 square feet. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

2. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Trustees of Virginia 
Beach United Mediodist Church for 
a Conditional Use Permit for a 
church (expansion) on certain 
property located at die routheast 
comer of Pacific Avenue and 19di 
Street. Said parcel contains 1.446 
acres. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

3. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Mark E & Cynthia 
Summs for a Conditional Use 
Permit for outside storage of 
vehicles on the north side of 
Quality Court beginning at a point 
750 feet more or less east of 
Central Drive. Said parcel contains 
4.761 acKs. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGR 

4. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Enterprise Rent-A- 
Car for a Conditional Use Permit 
for an auto rental establishment on 
the south side of Laskin Road 
beginning at a point 700 feet more 
or less east of Maxey Drive. Said 
parcel is located at 1877 Laskin 
Road and contains 5.035 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Jim Briggs for a 
Conditional Use Permit for mini- 
warehouses on the north side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard 
beginning at a point 182.5 feet east 
of Louisa Avenue. Said parcel is 
located at 1618 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and contains 27,442.8 
square feet. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

All interested pardes are invited 
to attend. 

RuUi Hodges Smidi, CMC/AAE 

City Clerk 

If you are physically disabled or 
visually impaired and need 
assistance at this meeting, please 
call die CITY CLERK'S OFFICE 
at 427-4303; Hearing impaired, call 
TDD only 427-4305 (TDD - 
Telephcxiic Device for the Deaf). 

17-6 
2t5-l 



For further information-contact 
The Virginia Beach Volunteer 
Council, 427-4722. 



Legal 
Notices 



Public Notice 



Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 



Public Notice 



Auction: 1985 Mercury Grand 
Marquis 

Serial: 2MEBP95F4FX600292 

Auction Date: 5/6/98 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Tidewater 
Accq)tance Corporation, 7000 N. 
Military Highway, Norfolk, Va 
23518. 

Tidewater Accept. Corp reserves 
die right to bid. 

17-1 
U4-24 



Public Notice 



The Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission will hold a Public 
Hearing on Wednesday, May 13, 
1998 at 12:00 Noon in die Council 
Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Princess Anne 
Courthouse, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. A briefing session will 




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be held at 9:00 a.m. in die City 
Manager's Conf»enceRoom, City 
Hall Building. PLANNING 
COMMISSION ACTIONS IS 
NOT A FINAL 
DETERMINATION OF THE 
APPLICATION, BUT ONLY A 
RECOMMENDATION TO THE 
CITY COUNCIL AS THE 
VIEWPOINT OF THE 
PLANNING COMMISSION. 
FINAL DETERMINATION OF 
THE APPLICATION IS TO BE 
MADE BY CITY COUNCIL AT 
A LATER DATE. AFTER 
PUBLIC NOTICE IN A 
NEWSPAPER HAVING 
GENERAL CIRCULATION 
WITHIN THE CITY. 

THOSE MEMBERS OF THE 
PUBLIC INTERESTED IN 
ATTENDING THE PUBLIC 
HEARING SHOULD BE 
ADVISED THAT, FOR 
REASONS THE PLANNING 
COMMISSION DEEMS 
APPROPRIATE, CERTAIN 
ITEMS ON THE AGENDA MAY 
BE HEARD OUT OF ORDER 
AND THAT IT SHOULD NOT 
BE ASSUMED THAT THE 
ORDER LISTED BELOW WILL 
BE EXACTLY FOLLOWED 
DURING THE PUBLIC 
HEARING. 

The staff reviews of some or all 
of die items on this agenda suggest 
that certain conditions be Jttlached 
to approval by City Council. 
However, it should not be assumed 
that those conditions constitute all 
die conditions that will ultimately 
be attached to the project. Staff 
agencies may impose fiirtho^ 
conditions and requirements during 
adminisuation of applicable city 
ordinances. 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

1. Appeal to Decisions of 
Administiative Officers in regard to 
cotain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for J. 
Robert Addenbrook. Property is 
located at 211 69th Street 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

2. Appeal to Decisions of 
Administrative Offico^ in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for 
Covington Contracting, Inc. 
Property is located at die soudiem 
extremity of Hawaiian Drive. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

3. Appeal to Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of die Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for George 
F. Darden, Jr. Property is located at 
2784 Seaboard Road. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

4. Appeal to Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of die Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for Mr. 
Todd Walter/Baita Develqpment 
Co., LLC. Property is located on 
Parcel C-2F, Princess Anne 
Marketplace. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGR 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

5. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Saint Matttews 
Catholic Church for a Conditional 
Use Permit for a church addition 
(classrooms) on pcopaty located 

1 15 feet more or less north of die 
intersection of Sandra Lane and 
Trestman Avenue. Said parcel is 
located at 3314 Sandra Lane and 
contains 13.013 acres. 
KEMPSVUXE BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Dala Corporation, a 
Virginia Corporation for a 
Conditional Use Permit for an 
Open Space Promotion on certain 
property located on die north side 
of Indian River Road beginning at 
a point 2080 feet more or less east 
of Hillcrest Farms Boulev^. Said 
parcel contains 30 acres. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon 
Application of DMR Holdings, 
LLC, for a Conditional Use Permit 
for an automotive repair gara^ 
(classic auto restcvation) on die 
north side of Princess Anne Road, 
east of Arrowhead Drive. Smd 
parcel is located at 5716 Princess 
Anne Road and contains .286. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

8. An Ordinance upon 
Applicati(X) of Wesuninsier- 
Canterbury of Hampton Roads, 
Inc., for a Ccmditional Use Permit 
for a iKme fa- tht aged, dis^edw 
handicapped (extension) at die 
northwest comer of Shore Drive 
and Starfish Road. Said i»rcel is 
located at 3100 Shore Drive ad 
contains 14.9 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN B(»CXJGH. 



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9. An Ordinance upon 
Af^lication of Prim^o Paramal 
Communication for a Conditional 
Use Permit for a communications 
tower on the south side of W^ 
Landing Road, west of West neck 
Ro^ Said parcel is located at 2465 
West Landing Road and contaiiK 
37 acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

10. An Ordinaice upon 
An)licati(Mi of Sprint. PCS for a 
Con(^itional \Ise Permit fiar 
telecommunications antennas on 
die nordi side of Holland Road, 
east of Dam Neck Road. Said 
parcel is located at 3040 Holland 
Road and contains 17.632 aaes. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

11. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Sprint, PCS for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a 
monopole communications tower 
located on the west side of 
Sandbridge Road, northeast of 
Colchester Road. Property is 
bounded on the east by Sandhidge 
Road and on die west by Hells 
Point Creek. Said parcel contains 
73.8 acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGR 

12. An Ordinance upcm 
Application of Sprint, PCS for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a 
communication tower on die west 
side of Lawson Road at its 
intersection with bxkpendence 
Boulevffltl Said parcel is located at 
1707 Lawson Road and contains 
25,958 square feet. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGR 

13. An Ordinance uprni 
Application of Paxson 
Communications Corporation fwa 
Conditional Use Permit for a 
communications tower on the east 
side of Clearfield Avenue 
beginning at a point 200 feet more 
or less nordi of Cleveland Street 
Said parcel is located at 230 
Clearfield Avenue and cmitains 
15.106 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGR 

14. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Foundry United 
Methodist Church fm a 
Conditional Use Permit for a 
church (additions) on Lots 5, 6, 7, 
8, 9 and 10 feet of Lot 10. BkxdE 
2, Lynnhaven Park. Said parcel is 
located at. 2801 Virginia Beadi 
Boulevard and contains 4.5 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

AMENDMENT TO LAND USE 
PLAN: 

15. Application of CH&B 
Associates. L.L.P., for an 
Amendment to the approved lind 
Use Plan for the Brenneman Farm 
Planned Unit Development. A 
relocation of approved uses within 
die 193 acre site are proposed. 
Sixteen acres of land designa^ for 
office use would be relocated to die 
north side of South Plaza Trail, 
approximately 16800 feet 
southwest of the intersection ol 
South Plaza Trail with 
Indqmdence Boulevard fOT medicd 
offices and a clinic. Sixteen acres 
of commercial inxqierty would be 
relocated at die ntmheastcOTnac^ 
die SouUi Plaza Trail and Princess 
Anne Road intersection. 
Additional. 15 acres of property 
located adj»:ent to die northeast of 
die Cadiolic High School would be 
designated fw an expansion of die 
existing Cadiolic High School. 
Residential units desipaledon die 
revised plan include: 240 
townhouses units, 330 apsrtmettL 
units, 120 apaitment/oHidominium 
units, 193 single family units, and 
96 single family condominium 
units for a total of 979 residential 
units. The existing land use jAm 
has a total of 979 residential units. 
The pn^x)sed land use plan may be 
viewed by the public at die 
Planning Departinent, Room 115, 
Operations Building, Municipal 
Center, Virginia Beach, VA. For 
more information please'call die 
Planning Department at 427-4621. 
Said pncel contains 193 aa^ more 
or less. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGR 

AMENDMENT: 

16. Application of die City of 
Virginia BeM:h to amend Sectiom 
111. 135, 401. 501, 601, 801. 
901. 1110. 1125, 1511. 1521 ad 
1531 of the City Zoning 
Ordinance, pertaining to the 
definition of, and standards 
pertaining to, housing for seniors 

DEFERRED BY PLANNING 
COMMISSION ON 4/8/98: 

17. An Ordimnce upon 
An)licttion of Mich^lD. Sifcn, 
Inc., a Virginia cwpwatiOT for a 
Change of Zoning IMstrict 
Classification from R-5D 
Residential Duplex District to 
CoiKlitkmid B-2 Ccmimunity 
Business District on oaOm 
property locate at die nodw^ 
c<»ner of Lyimhavwi i^kway and 
Salem RomL Tte prc^KH^laxiing 
classification change to 
Conditional B-2 is for commocial 
land use. The Cnnprdiensiwe Vim 
t&xmimn^ use of dus pn^ fix- 
marketplace corridor use in 
accordance with other PIm 
policies. Sakl penl raxiains S.17 
acres. KEMPSVILLE K»aX5R 

C^mtbNwd On Nga 7 



"W 



■■■■"■■■■■■■■■■^■■■■■■■^■■■IBMiiiMH 



Contlnutd From Pagt 6 
18. An CWinfflia upon 
Application of Racetrac Petroieum, 
Inc., for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from H 
Light Industrial District to 
Conditional B-2 Community 
Business District on the east side 
of S. Military Highway, 1700 feet 
more or less north of Atexandria 
Avenue. The proposed zoning 
classification change to 
CondiUonal B-2 is for commercial 
land uses. The Comprehensive 
Plan recommends use of this parcel 
for suburban employment use in 
accordance with other Plan 
policies. Said parcel is located at 
636 & 644 S. Military Highway 
and contains 1.368 acres 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

19. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Raxtrac Petroleum. 
Inc., for a Conditional Use Permit 
for gasoline' sales in conjunction 
with a convenience store on the 
east side of S. Military Highway, 
1700 feet more or less north of 
Alexandria Avenue. Said parcel is 
located at 636 & 644 S. Military 
Highway and contains 1.368 acres 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

20. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Hunt Assisted 
Living. LLC, for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification fitom 
0-1 Office District to 0-2 Office 
District on certain property located 
on the west side of Diamwid 
Springs Road beginning at a point 
250 feet more or less north of 
Wesleyan Drive. The proposed 
zoning classification change to 0-2 
is for office land Use. The 
Comprehensive Plan recommends 
use of this parcel for marketplace 
corridor. Said parcel contains 
2.9659 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

21. An Ordinasce upon 
Application of Hunt Assisted 
Living, LLC. for a CondiUonal 
Use Permit for a nursing home on 
certain property located on the West 
side of Diamond Springs Road 
beginning at a point 250 fcetmwe 
or less north of Wesleyan Drive. 
Said parcel contains 2.9659 does. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

22. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Nextel 
Communications. Inc., for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a 
wireless communications tower on 
the north side of Pleasant Ridge 
Road beginning at a point 3960 
feet east of Princess Anne Road. 
Said parcel is located at 1868 
Pleasant Ridge Road and contains 
28.745 acres. PUNGO 

wmmQii-. .. : :. 

All, interested parties are invited 
to attend. 

Robert J. Scott 

Planning DiiectfX' 

Copies of the proposed 
ordinances, resolution and 
amendments are on file and may he 
examined in the Department of 
Planning. For information call 
427-4621. 

If you are physically disabled or 
visually impaired and need 
assistance at this meeting, please 
call the CITY CLERK'S OFFICE 
at 427-4303. Hearing impaired, 
call: TDD only at 427-4305. (TDD 
- Telephonic Device tor the Deaf). 

17-3 
2t5-l 



The purpose of this ^blic 
hearing is to obtain public 
comment on the leasing of this 
property for agricultural usage. 

Any questions concerning this 
matter should be directed to the 
Office of Real Esute, Room 170, 
Building #2, in the Virginia Beach 
Municipal Center. The Real Estate 
Office telephone number is 427- 
4161. 
Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC/AAE 
City Clerk 

If you are physically disabled ot 
visually impaired and need 
assistance at this meeting, please 
call the CITY CLERK'S OFHCE 
at 427-4303; Hearing impaired, call 
TDD only 427-4305 (TDD - 
TeleiAonic Device fw the Deaf). 

17-5 
114-24 



d 



Public Notice 



Public Notice 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERKS OFHCE 

IN RE: ToUey v. ToUey 

Michael T. ToUey. Plaintiff y. 
Angela W. Tollcy, Defendant 

CASENO.CH98-1190 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is for die 
said Plaintiff to obtain a divorce a 
Vinculo Matrimonii on the 
grounds that parties have been 
separated without cohabitation and 
without interruption exceeding a 
period over oi» year. 

It is ORDERED that Angela W. 
ToUey appear and protect her 
interest, on or before June 15, 
1998, which date is no soono- than 
fifty days after witry of this order of 
publication. 

And it is further ORDERED that 
this order of pubUcation be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of genoal 
circulation in this City described 
by this court 

Date: April 14, 1998 

J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By Bill MauU, Dqjuty Cterk 

17-2 
4t5-14 



Virginia: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
Plaintiff V. 

$1,593.00 U.S. Currency 
(Hobbs). CL95-2609 

$615.00 U.S. Currency 
(Corprew),CL97-10 

$1,006.00 U.S. Currency 
(Anderson), CL97-507 

$1,750.00 U.S. Currency 
(Godwin), CL95-686 

$850.00 U.S. Currency (Koch), 
CL97-2283 

$337.00 U.S. Currency (Knapp), 
CL97-2284 

CL97-3530 $25,900.00 USC 
(Brown/Jennings), Defendants 
Order of Publication And Affidavit 
THIS DAY CAME the Attorney 
for the Commonwealth and moved 
this Honorable Court to forfeit to 
the Commonwealth of Virginia the 
above referenced items that- were 
seized between August 9, 1995, 
and December 3, 1997. 

AN information was made, 
signed and filed with the Circuit 
Court Clerk's Office on each of the 
above matters. Said information 
stated the owner(s) of the prc^rty 
and the last known address(es)of 
the owner(s) at the time the 
Information was filed. 

It appearing that the whereabouts 
of the owners is currently 
unknown, and that a registered 
letter has been mailed to their last 
known addresses, it is ter*y 
ORDERED, that all parties ^jpear 
on or before May 20, 1998, and do 
whatever is necessary to |»otect 
their interest in said property. 

It is further ORDERED that 
pursuant to Section 19.2.386.3(B) 
of the Code of Virginia (1950), as 
amended, this Order of Publication 
be published once a week for four 
successive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of general 
circulation in the City of Virginia 
Beach. 

ENTER THIS 24th day of 
March, 1998. 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk of the 
Circuit Court 

By Barbara Mundin, Deputy 
Clerk 
I ask for this: 
Robert J. Humphreys 
Commonwealth's Attorney 
By Mary Y. Gcssler 
Assistant Commonwealth's 
Attorney 

Office of the Commonwealth's 
Auomey 
2305 Judicial Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456- 
9650 

I. Mary Y. Gessler, Assistant 
Commonwealth's Attorney, after 
having first duly sworn, depose and 
state as follows: 

That pursuant to Section 8.01- 
316 of the Code of Virginia 
(1950), as amended, that diligence 
has been used without effect to 
ascertain the location of the above 
listed parties. 

Mary Gessler, Affiant 
• COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH, 
to- wit: 

I, Jaye Lee A. Cullen, a Notary 
Public in and for the City and State 
afwesaid, do hereby certify that tl» 
foregoing Affidavit of Mary Y. 
Gessler. Assistant 
Commonwealth's Attorney, w^ 
sworn to and subscribed to b^ore 
me this 20th day of March, 1998 

Jaye Lee A. Cullen, Notary 
Public 

My Commission Expires: 
6/30/000 

14-2 
4t4-24 



Public Notice 



Public Notice 



PUBUC NOTICE 
LEASE OF CITY PROffiRTY 
The Virginia Beach City Council 
will hold a PUBUC HEARING on 
the lease of approximately 74.5 
acres of City-owned prt^Krty, 
Turaday, April 28. 1998. at 6.-00 
PM in tte City CamcU Ownbcn 

a. Aj^wox. 47.6 ac. off North 
landing Road, SW of the 
Municii»l Cmt^ 

b. Ap^m. 26.9 ac. off Siton 
R(Ml neffi' Highland EMv^JAm 
IteMl 



VIRGINIA: IN THE JUVENILE 
AND DOMESTIC RELATIONS 
DISTRICT COURT OF TIffi 
CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

IN RE: 

KATHERINE ELIZABETH 
POORE, aMimw 

IN THE MATTER OF TOE 
ADOPTION OF THE CHLD 
KNOWN AS KATHERINE 
HJZABETO POORE 
. BIRTH CERTIFICATE 
REOISTRATKW 

NO. 145-94-073788. 
REGISTERED IN THE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

VIRGINIA 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
notify Steven Wayne Matttews, 
the putative father of the minor 
child, that a Petition to adopt the 
minor child by Leigh Poore Harris, 
the natural mother of the minor 
child, and Jeffrey L. Han'is, the 
spouse of the natural mother, has 
been filed. 

And affidavit having been made 
and filed that the last known post 
office address of Steven Wayne 
Matthews was 824 Rivanna River 
Reach, Chesapeake, Virginia, 
23320, that mail has been letumed 
and that the cunent whereabouts of 
Steven Wayne Matthews ae 
unknown. 

It is ORDERED that the said 
Steven Wayne Matthews, upon 
whom diligence has been used 
without effect to ascertain his 
location, appear at the above named 
Court on or before May 14, 1998 
at 11:00 A.M. and do what is 
necessary to protect his interests. 

It is further ordered that the 
foregoing portion of this order be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper publidied 
in the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

FREDERICK C. JENKS, lU, 
CLERK 

KELLAM. PICKRELL, COX & 
TAYLOE 

A Professional Corporation 

JANICE PICKRELL 
ANDERSON 

300 Bank of the Commonwealth 
Building 
403 Boush Street 
Norfolk, VA 23510 
Telephone: (757) 627-8365 

14-1 
4t4-24 



VIRGINIA BEACH 
TINA SAUNDERS RIDDLE, 

Complainant, v. 

PHILLIP B. RIDDLE, 2576 
Barwick Drive, Durham, North 
Carolina, 27704, Defendant 
CHANCERY NO. CH98-1078 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is for the 
complainant, TINA SAUNDERS 
RIDDLE, to obtain a divorce A 
VINCULO MATRIMONII from 
the defendant, PHILLIP B. 
RIDDLE, upon the grounds (rf 
separation in excess of six (6) 
months. 

It is ORDERED that PHILLIP 
B. RIDDLE, the defendant herein, 
appear and protect his interest, on 
or before May 26, 1998, which 
date is no sooner than fifty (toys 
after entry of this Order of 
Publication. 

And it is further ORDERED that 
this Order of Publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of genasi 
circulation in this City prescribed 
by this Court 

Dated: March 31, 1998 

J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By Bill Maull, Deputy Clerk 

15-4 
4t5-l 



H 



Virginia Bc«A Sun, Friday. April 24. 1998 7 



And it is further ORDERED that 
this order of publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun. a newspaper of gaieral 
circulation in this City prescribed 
by this court. 

Date: April 6, 1998 

J. CURTIS FRUIT. CLERK 

By Bill Maull, Deputy Clerk 

16-3 
4t5-8 



Public Notice 



Public Notice 



Public Notice 



i: 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINU 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERK'S OFFICE 

IN RE: Jesus Lopez Rodriguez, 
Jr. 

CASE NO. CH97-3365 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
change the name of Jesus Lopez 
Rodriquez. Jr. to "Jess Lopez 
Ortega." 

It is ORDERED Jesus Lopez 
Rodriguez. Sr.. appearand protect 
his interest, on or before May 28, 
1998, which date is no sooner than 
fifty days after entry of this order of 
publication. 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINL\ 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERK'S OFHCE 

IN RE: Natalie Marie Rodriguez 

CASE NO. CH97-3366 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
change the name of Natalie Marie 
Rodriguez" to "Natalie Marie 
Ortega" 

It is ORDERED Jesus Lapa 
Rodriguez, Sr., appearand protect 
his interest, on or before May 28, 
1998, which date is no sooner thai 
fifty days aft» entry of this order of 
publication. 

And it is further ORDERED that 
this order of publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of gaiaal 
circulation in this City pescribed 
by this court. 

Date: April 6, 1998 

J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By BUI MauU. Deputy Clerk 

164 
4t5-8 



Public Notice 



Trustee's Sale 
2524 Hidden Shwes Drive, #102, 

Virginia Beach. VA 
DEFAULT having been made in 
the terms of a certain Deed of Tnist 
dated January 7. 1994, and recorted 
in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach. VA. in Deed Book 3332, a 



page 1529, and Uie undeiagned, 
having been duly appointtd m 
Substitute Trustees and having 
been reqtwstedso to do by the 
holder of the note secured, wUI 
{xooMdto kU at public auction for 
cash on April 30, 1998. at 9:00 
a.m.. in front of the buikling 
housing the Virginia Beach Circuit 
Court. 2305 Judicial Boulevaid, 
Virginia Beach, VA 23456, the 
property (tesignated as Unit N6. 
102i in Building No. 2524 
"Condominium Plats and Plans of 
Hidden Shores, a Condominium. 
Phase Three," recorded in the 
Cleric's Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia Beach, VA, 
Map Book 231. at pages 84-90, 
and in Declaration of Hddn 
Shores, a Condominium. loxxded 
in Deed Book 3027, at page 499. 
and as amoided. 

The fwoperty wiU be sold wbject 
to all prior liens, easements, 
restrictions, covenants, and 
conditions, if any, of recod, or 
other matters which would be 
disclosed by an accurate survey or 
inspection of the pmnises. 

A deposit (in certified funds) rf 
10% will be required of die 
successful bidder at time of sale and 
settlement to be made wiUiin 10 
days. TERMS: CASH. The 
successful bidcfer will berequuedto 
execute a Memorandum ctf 
Trustee's Sale ouUining addition^ 
tenns of sale andsetUement which 
will be available for review jmtot to 
the announcement of sale. 

This is a communication from a 
debtcoltector. 
Gksser and Glasser, PX.C., 
Substitute Trustee 
Dominion Tower. Suite 600 
999 Waterside Drive 
Norfolk. VA 23510 
Tel: (757) 625-6787 Ext 200 
Between 10:00 a.m. &. 12:00 
noon only. 
File No. 42267 

16-7 
2t4-24 




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on the coverage that's just right for v..u, call one of the local independent agents listed below. 



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8 Virginia Beach Sun, Friday, April 24, 1998 



Classifieds 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



KRSONAL 
RATES 

Itkne 
2 times 
4 times 



aOWonis 



$ 7.50 
$13.50 
$ 22.50 



AddHlonal 
words 

.35 

.70 

1.40 



Run your Classified Ad four times for only $22.50. You can cancel 
your ad at any time. 

All Classified Ads run in three newspapers (The Virginia Beach Sun, The Chesap- 
eake Post and The Portsmouth Times). No additional charge. 



Please print clearly using only one word per box. 
























• 
















20 words 



Run my personal ad for . 
Payment Is enclosed $ . 



issues. 



Make elMck payable to Byeriy Pubiicattona 
MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327, Chesapeake, Va. 23327 



Name_ 
Address 
City 



FOR HELP with your Classified Ad, please call 547-4571 . 

COMBWATOK HATE: Hun Ihk tam* pereonal ad m any other Byeriy PuWicaliotu nampapei kw an 
■MHond t3 one Ikne, tS two time*. t7 lour times. Newspapeti In FranUin, EmpoHa, Lawranceville, 
Dtnariddle mi Pmnbutg. Call S474571 Iw detallt. 



ADOPTION 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



A LOVING COUPLE seeks new- 
born to complete our family, and to 
share its love, laughter and warmth. 
Stay at home Mom. Expenses paid. 
Susanne/Paul 1-800-975-5495. 

4/24 

AiX>PT We can give your infant 
iovs and security. You can help 
make us a family. Expenses paid. 
Please call Dee & Pete toll free at 1 - 
888-866-6440. 
5/8 

ADOPT - A bving couple wishes 
more than anything to raise your 
newixjrn with love, care and warmth. 
Medical/legal expenses paki. Strk^tly 
conf kjential. Please call LuAnn and 
Jeff at 1-800-710-7776. 

5/1 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



MILES - MIP 

HUD Tracer Program 
$ 4.00 for Information 
Call (757) 543-2733 or write 
P.O. Box 5222 
Chesa^ake, Virginia 23324 



5/1 



USED SHOES III Southskje Boys & 
Girls Club & Coach Williams are 
conducting an ongoing used shoe 
drive as a fund raiser to SUPPORT 
OUR YOUTH PROGRAMS. We are 
accepting wearable shoes from your 
ck>sets, friends, relatives, and em- 
pksyees II 731 E. Berkley Avenue, 
Norfolk, 545-5963. 

5/15 



"CLASSY BLACK SINGLES CLUB" 
for ages 30/overforming now. Needs 
men/women for: Dates-DinJng- 
Dancing-Dinners-Shows-Trips. 
Wednesday Nites Club meetings 
and social hours. FrkJay nites Meet 
us for "Friday Nile Jams". Call our 
24 hour hotline 367-2592 for further 
details. 

TFN 

GET YOUR PRE-PAID 
PHONE CARD 

at Et-Rey Mexican 

Bakery & Cafe 

lowest rates 

to any part of the world 

587-4359 

5/10 

ARE YOU READY FOR LOVE? 
Call Now! 

1-900-407-7783, ext. 3729 
$2.99 per. min. Must Be 18yrs. 
Sen^-U 619-645-8488 

QUIT WORRYING 

& Call A Psyche ' 

1-900-659-2222 Ext. 3615 

$3.99 Min. 18yrs 

SERV-U 1-619-645-8434 

http://www.mm02.com/psychic. 

1108079.html 

5/8 



LOOKING 

For The Perfect Date? 

Singles in Your Area 

Call 1-900-287-0467 Ext.4479 

18yrs. Serv-U 

1-619-645-8434 

http://www.mm02.com/date. 

1108079.html 



Get Sports Odds 

Point Spreads 

1-900-378-5754ext1179 

18yrs. SERV-U 1-619-645-8434 

http://www.mm02.com/sports. 

1108079.html 

5/B 

To Talk With A Girl 

That Is Just Right For You 

1 -900-255-0700 Ext. 4695 

$3.99 min. 18 yrs 

Sen/-U 1-619-645-8434 

http:www.mm02.com/chat. 

1108079.html 

5/8 

ANNOUNCMENTS 
GUARANTEED ADVERTISING 
RESULTS! Localized on-line adver- 
tising on the Internet Yellow Pages. 
Free report and info. 24 hours. Call 
545-1020. 

5/1 

FOLK DANCE PERFORMING 
GROUP. Dancers needed. Espe- 
cially men who enjoy dancing at 
festivals and weddings. Similar to 
Busch Gardens Dance Group. Call 
Mike at 486-6098 or 486-7349. 

sn 

SINGERS / RAPPERS / CHURCH 
CHOIRS. Put your music on CD 
starling at $6.00 per CD. For infor- 
mation ask for Dwayne Adams, 888- 
777-1123. 

5/15 

ROMANTIC GET-A-WAY Chesa- 
peake Bay sunsets from your win- 
dow. Close by escape in Cape 
Charles. Call 757-331-2424. 
www.baysunset bb.com 



INTERNATIONAL COUNTRY 
DANCING. Fridays, 7:30 at 
Newtown Elementary school. Vari- 
ous dance styles. Singles and 
couples welcomed. Call 486-6098. 

5^ 

Retired Navy Master Chief John O. 
Parmele, Jr., asks for your vote. 
May 5, 1998, Virginia Beach City 
Council. Thanks I 
ii2±. 

AUCTION - CHOWAN GALLERY 
Murfressboro, NC. Next auction 

4^5 - 6:13 P. M. 
Call (919-398-8020) B Hill, NC 

#1490, VA#2323. 

4/24 

INTUITIVE READER - All areas of 
life. VA, Beach, 757-463-0985. Sat- 
isfaction guaranteed. 

5/8 



KID'S STUFF CONSIGNMENT 
BOUTIQUE Stop, shop, save!! 
Iteks money on Items no longer 
used - ctothing, toys, baby needs. 
Mon - Sat., 1 - 6 PM Call 855-5437. 

S/1 



ANTIQUES / COLLECTIBLES 



COLLECTIBLES & GIFTS 

By-Pass Flea Market, Great Bridge 

1325 South Battlefield Blvd. 

Mon-Thurs. 10a.m. - 5p.m. 546- 

1584 

were 5/1 



Service Directory 



ADULT CARE 



CHILD CARE 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 



WILLPROVIDELOVING ELDERLY 
care for lady in large, Suffolk country 
home. Sc«nk:viewfrom eat-in back 
porch. $8(X>. a month, includes live- 
bi arangaments. Private bedroom 
and bath, meals, shopping, outings, 
vacmkm.diurch and van travel. Call 
757-357-<»97. 

. 5^ 

ADULT CARE Exceptionally nice 
home. Loving 24 hr. care. Sincere 
inqulriss only. Call 919-539-36%. 

5/1 



CHILD CARE 



NEED A BABYSITTER??? 

S^s. TtMab. MfWied care for in- 
tend, tt)ddtors ar^f oWar kids. Non- 
Sfflokhig. 
Cat ^2-^ 

5/15 

OCEANA/REDMU- SUMMER 
CARE-VA N^riM. CPR. First AW, 
USOA. Po^ iM^ fwiosd yard, 
NqraqiN^rmM.MdMps.Syn.-up. 
Caa^1^M3. 



HOMESCHOOL MOTHER OF 2 

Looking to provWe full/part-time day 
care in the Oceana area. Please call 
428-7247. 



ROSEMONT AREA - Mom of 1. 

Night/Weekend openings. PT/FT, 
Drop-ins, Duty. Playroom, 
sleeproom, large fenced yard. Rea- 
sonable rates. Call Kerri, 486-3852. 

5/8 

WINDSOR OAKS • Lcensed home 
day care tiding before & after school 
chikJrsn only. Prk:es range from $50 
to$%we^ly. 0^1631 -€748 

5/8 

MOTHER OF VNO wlH provMe 
chikf care in my horns, M-F, 6 AM to 
4 PM. One full, one P/T avwtaUe. 
Call 548-8479. 

LOVING CARE - in my Snwysrs 
Meadow/Deep Creek home. Fsn^d 
yard. Irtfants wskXMns. Can 558- 
19S. 

4/17 



RECONDITIONED WASHERS 8> 

DRYERS ■ Trade in allowed. 

Warranteed. $99.95/Ea.&up. Cash 

for some non-working units. Call 

485-7337. 

5^5 

ANY TYPE HOME IMPROVE- 
MENT. Reasonable!!! Quality paint- 
ing, fkxjring, plumbing, rtc. Call 588- 
7098. 

5/8 



WATER POLLUTION SOLUTION! 

Give your family the best water in 
town. Find out how. Call 543-92K 
for a free demonstrationll 

GENERAL HOUSECLEAMNQ. 

Move-Ins or Move-outs 
Offk» and Reskiential 
Reasonable Rates, Day, Weekly, or 
Monthly. Call 853-6933. 

5/15 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



CERAMICS 

Fired, Unpainted 
All in good conditk)n. 
Call 853-6933. 



5/15 



HOTEL FURNITURE 

From Pavilllon Towers. Selling one 
piece or lots. Dressers, beds, bed- 
spreads, desks, chars, lamps, mir- 
rors, carpets, pictures, etc... Call 
622-8300. See at 2401 Montk:elk> 
Avenue, Norfolk. 
5/15 

ETHAN ALLEN 3 PIECE ENTER- 
TAINMENT CENTER - with match- 
ing shelf units, soiki oak, mint condi- 
tion. Originally $3000, sacrafioe 
$1200. Call 460-3664. 

4/24 

PIANO Wurlltzsr, mahogany, ex- 
cellent condKkjn, ussd approxl- 
matsly 9 months to prsctlce Iss- 
sons. $2200 nsg. Call 424-1380. 

5/1 



BEAUTY SUPPUES 



A BEAUTIFUL BODY could be 
yours! Your own! If I saM you could 
have a beautiful body in 90 days, 
wouW you just call? 473-0473. 

4/24 

DRY, SORE, CRACKED HANDS? 

I have found a remedy for mine. It 
may help you ,too I Call me at 631- 
0716. 

4/24 



LOOK GOOD! FEEL GOOD! Call 
for product and opportunity. 
Herbalife Distributor. Free sample- 
Free informat»n booklet. Call 363- 
7080. 

5/15 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 



EARN THOUSANDS stuffing enve- 
lopes. Send Self-addressed, 
stamped envetope : J & D, Inc. 3782 
Canadian Arch, Virginia Beach Va 
23456. 

5/15 

ANEW AVON Full tIms/Part time 
Rsps nssdsd In TMswatsr arsa. 
Earn up to 50%. A fantastic op- 
portunity. Call 721-5622. 

5/1 



NASCAR UCENSED PRODUCTS 
BUSINESS. No selling. High Income 
restock profitable accounts. (Food 
Store & Drug Stores) $1 5,995 Start- 
up required 1-800-221-1984. 



RECRUITERS-OPEN YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS within the largest com- 
pany in the U.S.A. & Canada. Train- 
ing provided. Call CRS 588-9170. 

5/8 



COKE/PEPSI VENDING ROUTE 

Many high traffk; sites. $2500 a week 
potential. Call 800-342-6653. 

5/1 



EARN THOUSANDS stiuffing en- 
velopes. Send self-addressed, 
stamped envebpe: J & D Inc. P 
Box 24426, Richmond, VA 23224. 

. S/1 5 

AVON - Perfect Part-time Jobll! 
Perfect second Joblll Flexible 
schedule. Sell where you liva/Woric. 
Ind. sales rep. 1-800-458-9750. 

5/15 

COKE/PEPSI 

Best Program in U.S.A. 
Excellent LocatkKis 
$1 , 2004 wkly potential 
Minimum Investment 4K 
1-800-617- sxt# 1106. 

4/17 

EARN THCH^SANDS Stuffing en- 
vefopes. Send self-addr«sssd, 
stamped snvsl^M: J & D Inc. P O 
Box 8829, Pstsrsburg, VA 23K)6. 

5/15 



K 





UnibedWby 

of South Hampton Roads 




BLANKET ALL VIRGINIA 

Ad Network Classifieds are 

published in 78 state I'lewspapers. 

4 million plus readers. 

25 WORDS $225. 

(For more than 25 words there is an additional 
charge of $8.00 per word.) 

Call 547"4dT I for Classified Representative 



WOLFF TANNING BEDS, TAN AT 23919. PUBLIC AUCTION - COMMON- 

HOME. Buy DIRECT and SAVEI WEALTH OF VIRGINIA ■ SATUR- 

Commsrcial/Home units Irom FRIENDLY TOYS « GIFTS has im- DAY • APRIL 25, 1998 ' 9:00 AM • 
$199.00. Low Monlhly Payments medtataopanlnQslnyouraraa. Num- STATE SURPLUS PROPERTY 
FREE Color Catalog CALL TO- bar Ona in Party plan: Toys, gifts, WAREHOUSE 1910 

DAY 1. 800-842-1310 Christmas, Home decor, Freecala- DARBYTOWN ROAD, RICHMOND, 

log and information. 1 ■800-488-4875 VIRGINIA JOHN DEERE TRAC- 
CREOITCARD PROBLEMS? Debt TOR 400 ' 1 982 PLYMOUTH • 1 985 

Consolidation Avoid Bankruptcy. Did you know, Medicare and Private RELIANT " MODEL 48, CINCIN- 
Slop Creditor Calls Cut Interest Insurance pays up to 80% of Diabe- NATI LATHE' OOALLSAWC-12' 
No Credit Check One Low Pay- tea lasting supplies Eipress-Med SAND BLASTER ' WELDER, 
meni. National Consolidalors, Inc. delivers Meters, Lancets, Teal Strips ORAMWELD ' GENERATOR, 1,5 
(800)270-9894 1 -800-678-5733 to register. & 23 KW • TABLE SAW ' DRILL 

PRESS • AIR COMPRESSOR ■ 
DRIVER. , $30,000 Firal Year Po- DIABETICS (USING INSULIN) Did REPEATA-FIL, HAYSSEN • BOAT 
tentiall Hiring Drivers! No Experi- you know Medicare or insurance cov- MOTOR MARINER 2 5 175 HP, 
ence Necessary! Training AvailablBi ers most supplies? Save Money-Call MAGNUM EFI ■ COPIERS " FAX 
New Pay Package. Consistent miles. 1-800-234-4070, Liberty Medical. MACHINES * FILE CABINETS ' 
JobStabilily, Assigned Equipment Satislaction Guaranteed No HMO OFFICE DESKS 'LAP TOPS, COM- 
Swilt Transportation 1-800-347- Members PUTERS & PRINTERS ■ OLD 

4698 (eoe-m/l) MARBLE TOP DRESSER, WARD- 

DEBT CONSOLIDATION! Overdue ROBE. TABL^P TAMBOUR ROLL 
■CASH" IMMEDIATE $$ lor struo- credit cards and other bills? Maxed TOP DESK, METAL' MUCH MORE 
tured settlamants and deferred in- out? Reduce payments ..lowerinler- Mil!! ITEMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE 
suranca claims. J.Q.Wentworth 1- est stop collections avoid bank- !1l!l FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMA- 
888231 -5375. rupcy restore credit... confidential. TION CONTACT STATE SURPLUS 

CCCI 1-888-455-2227. NonProllt PROPERTY (804)236-3666 OH 
LOCAL CANDY ROUTE. 30 Vend- Bonded. WWW DGS STATE VA US/OPS. 

ing Machines. Earn apx. $d00/day. 

Alllor$9.995.Call1-80O-99e-VEND DEPENDS(r), WINGS (r). Adult dia- PERMENANT FULLTIME AND 
pars at wholesale prices delivered 10 PARTIME MERCHANDISERS 
$$AVON$$ Potsniial $200-$2000 yourhome.MEDICAIDrecipientsmay NEEDED EXPERIENCE IN POG 
per month. Sell where & when you beeligibletogettheseproductsFREE! RESETS. HUFFY SERVICE FIRST, 
like, its not just door to door any- Call HomeCare Delivered 1 -800- 565- HOURLY PAY, DEPENDENT ON 
more.Medical/olherinsuranceavail- 5644 EXPERIENCE BENEFITS! CALL 

able 1-800-288-6311 Ind Rep HUFFY 1-800-952-4738 EXT 5070 

Canyouliveon$5,000/Week. Start- OR 4708 
Assemble Arts, Crafts and toys in ing in 4-6 weeks. Fantastic Support 

your spars time. Also serving typ- EntrepreneurialPeopleOnly. 1-888- BECOME A MEDICAL TRAN- 
ing and computer work Great pay 310-8519 www.gpgonline com/ SCfllPTIONIST OPPORTUNITY 
Call 1-800-632-8007 |imohio. JO WORK AT HOME OR IN OF- 

FICE TYPING FOR DOCTORS 
Swimming Pool's $887 New 1997 LOVE TO SHOP? 1 5 Mystery shop- HOME STUDY FREE LITERA- 
Factory Left Over Models Hugh persneededl Eiceilantpay/parttima. TURE PC D I .ATLANTA, GEOR- 
19X31X4' Deep Comes Complete No experience necessary. CallnowGIA 800-362-7070 DEPT 
With Giant Size Sun Deck, Safety (888)430-7676 ext 3224. YYE73802 

Fence, In Pool Ladder, Liner, Fil- 
ter. Pump « Motor Installation and BILL PROBLEMS? 1 -800-408-0044 73 LAKEFHONT LOTS- From 
Financing Available. No Bank- ext. 1032 9am-9pm 7 days Debt $24,8801 New release, 1 acre plus, 
ruptcy's. Call 24 hrs 1 - 800-447- consolidation loans and programs on beautiful 20 mile long lake Re- 
7207. available Bad credit OK No ad- siricted, private entrance Water, 

vancefeesi Free consultation Non- front bargains! 800-715-5533 
WOLFF TANNING BEDS SolkJ steel, profit Lower Monthly Payments www,lakefrontpropertie8 com 
lull body tanning beds New/Used 

Financing available For free cata- N MYRTLE BEACH, SC - Summer WANT TO LEARN TO DRIVE A 
log call: 1-800-537-91 13(804-757 Weeks Available! Luxun^, Affordable TRACTOR-TRAILER? Learn on '98 
area code) 1-800-447OO40-(640- Ocaanfront/Oceanview Condos/ Conventional Units FUTURE 
703areacode) Homes 1-6, Bedrooms Fully TRUCKERSOF AMERICA 1095-A 

Equipped Clean, Safe Beaches. Free West Dixie Drive Asheboro, NC 
DONATE YOUR CAR Heritage Brochure Elllolt Raally 1-800-525- 27203, 1-800-610-3777. 
Forthe Blind Tax Deductible Free 0225. 

Towing, Free Phone Card to'Do- ORIVERS-$30,000-$35,Q00 CA- 

norsw/Ad«1265. 1-800-2-Donate. A Beautiful Chapel/Church Christian REERI Over 45 Carriers Hire Our 
Wedding Gatlinburg's Original (since Grads! LOCAL TRACTOR TRAILER 
ATW, Inc. Tractor/Trailer Drivers, 1980). Photography. Music, Flow- TRAINING 3 Weeks or 8 Week- 
All Teams, All East-Weal All Hood- ers, Limos, Jacuzzi Suites, Fireplaces ends. Financing Available Ship- 
Condos, Trip Average 5,800 Miles, Love Walk Brick. Rev. Ed Taylor 1 - pers ChokM of VA. 1 800/646-2374 
Top Pay Package 800-948-6723. 800-346-2779 http://www.gatrinburg 

chapels.com ORIVEHS/OTR SOLOS » Teams 

HOMEOWNERScallCommonPoint needed! Haul specialized freight. 

Mortgage today and gat the cash TANNING BEOS Finally, tanning Excellent pay 8 benefit packag*. 
you need. Eliminate high-interest salon quality tanning beds tor the Need 1 year recent T/T S CDL(A) 
credit card debt, repair damaged home Guaranteed satisfaction or your w/HazMat, EDE, 1 -800-298. 747S. 
credHormakehomeimprovements. money back. FINANCING AVAIL- 

1-800-968-2221 ABLE. $45.00 a month. Call today 1- GERMAN STUDENT AND OTHER 

800-892-5015. SCANDINAVIAN, EUROPEAN, 

ATW, Inc, Owner-Operator Teams SOUTH AMERICAN, ASIAN, HUS- 

All East/West. Earn $170,000 + p/ LEASE PURCHASE PROGRAM SIAN EXCHANGE STUDENTS 
yr 800-948-6723 AVAILABLE OTR Drivers 8 Owner ARRIVING AUGUST BECOME A 

Operators Conventional Kenworth HOSTFAMILY/AISE CALL 1 -800- 
REFINANCEi SAVE $ 100s EACH Equipment No Downpayment Lib SIBLING WWW SIBLING ORG 
MONTH, With Today's Low Mort- era! Payback Schedule! SOUTH- 

gage Rates Consolidate debt, im- WESTERN FREIGHT CARRIERS A BECOME AN INTERNATIONAL 
prove your home or get needed Division olBurlinglon Motor Carriers FAMILY, Host an exchange stu- 
cash with Fairbank Mortgage '24- 1-800-968-8743, Ext. 141 or 125 dent International Fellowship has 
hourpre-approvals'Quick Closings helped families anioy this experi- 

Competilive Rates Custom Pro- 1ST 8 2ND MORTGAGES FAST, ence lor 30* years. For more inlor- 
grams For Every Need "Good * Any Credit Rating No Upfront Fees, mation call today 1 -800-647-8839 
problem credifNo-lncomeVerilica- Easy PaymenI Plans Great Rales. 

lion 'Self employed 'Bankruptcy Call Charles Toney at 804.2820605 AUCTION-Conslruclion Equipment 
'125% Equity Financing We Bend or 1800-269-1311 Crosslal* Mort- and Trucks-May 2nd, 10 AM, 
Over Backwards To Approve Your gage Roanoke, VA 100 s ol Items! Call 

Loan FAIRBANK MORTGAGE 1- for Brochure & Terms, Accepting 

800-346-5626 ext 562 VA Lie ML SPRING ANTIQUES » COL- Equipment Daily MACI Auction- 
251 LECTIBLES, MAY 1-2, CARLISLE eers Infl, 1-888-MOTLEYS 

PA FAIRGROUNDS HUNDREDS OF VAAL»16. 
MEDICARE RECIPIENTS are you DEALERS SELLING UNIQUE AN- 

using a NEBULIZER MACHINE? TIOUES AND COLLECTIBLES OWN YOU OWN apparel, shoe. 
STOP paying full price for Albuterol, FURNITURE, GLASSWARE, western wear, lingerie, bridal, gift 
Atrovent, etc SOLUTIONS MEDI- CLOTHING, JEWELRY. MUCH or$1 00 store Includes inventory, 
CARE will pay lor them We bill MORE (717)243-7855. fixtures, buying trip, training Mini- 

MEDICARE lor you and ship di- mum investment $18,900 00 Call 

rectly to your door MED-ASAVE Driver OTR COVENANT TRANS- Dan at Liberty 501-327-8031 
1-800-538-9849 PORT Major Pay Increase Coming- 

$1,000 Sign-On Bonus Experienced Buy Now. Build Laleri Spacious 
STEEL BUILDING SALE ..SAVE Drivers -Average Run 1800 Miles- wooded 2 lo 25 acre properties in 
45% No Salesman Spring/Sum- Health/Life Insurance Available FirsI exclusive.gatedcommunity Mead- 
mer/FallDelivery 20X30 $3,249 00 Day On Truck. Experienced Drivers/ owland, starting at $79,9001 Lib- 
2SX36$4,266 00.30X40$4,98e00 Owner Operators Call 1-800-441- eral Financing Available Minutes 
40X60 $7,760 00 56X90 4394 Graduate Students Call 1-800- from Fredericksburg, call 1-800- 
$12,375 00 Several Others. Pio- 338-6428 262-0668 www.Meadowland com 

near 1-800 -666-S422 

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL RV SALE TAN AT HOME DON'T MAKE A 
SAWMILL $3795 Saws logs into April 20-26 Major Manufacturers HUGE mistake Compare the 
boards, planks, beams Large ca- Represented Factory Leftovers/ SunMaster twd to everything else. 
pacHy. Best sawmill value anywhere. Demo's/Low Mileage Used/All Units You'll be glad you did Free color 
Free information. Nomvood Saw- Priced To Sell Immediately Call 1 - catalog Financing I -800-5337282 
mills, 90 Curtwright Drive »3, 800-305-9045 

Amhersi, NY 14221 1- 800-578- NEED A LOAN? We can help' 

1363. ASSISTED CARE RESIDENCES, Consolidate Credit Cards Fast 

seven Virginia locations Licensed Results!!! Good or Bad Credit. 
HOMEOWNERS WANTED! Kayak 24-hour ambulatory/non-ambulatory (888)667-8893 Liberty Associates 
Pools looking lor demonstration care, from $1,000 American Retire- 

homesiles lo display new mainle- menI Homes, Chariottesville. 1-800- SIDING INSTALLERS, experienced. 
nancelreeKayakPools-Savethou- 999-6637, needed immediately Work year 

sands of $$, Unique opportunity! round wilhm 50 miles ol Lynchburg 

100%linancingavailable. 800-510- DRIVERS-OTR ADVANCE YOUR or Danville Reliable truck « equip- 
5624 FLATBED CAREER WITH ADS! ment Call ALLGOOO Const , 1- 

Phone Applications Approved in 2 800-638-3601 10am-2pm 
PRESSURE CLEANERS Factory Hours! $1,000 Sign -On Bonus 8 More! 

Direct Sale!!! Honda 2800 PSI $599, Call Today! 800-646-3438 Exi 1015 CA$H NOWl We buy payments 
3500 PSI $799, 4000 PSI $999, Owner Operators Wek»mat receivad Irom •nnyilies. insurance 

4500 PSI $1449 Lowest Prices settlemenis, VSI, lotteries, military 

Guaranteedl!!FREEcalalog 1-800' LIVE FISH lor ponds Water Plants pensions, teller-financed mort- 
931-9274 (24 Hours) Lilies Over 32 Species Available gages, business notes, inhanUnees 

Catalog Upon Request ZETTS FISH Bast Priceal 1-800-722-7472 Ad- 
Driver-Earn up lo $800 per week HATCHERY, Rt2Box218K,lnwood, vance Funding. www advancelund 
your lirst year with USA TRUCK! WV 2S428 (304) 229-3654 com 

Late-fflodal conventionals with sal- 

ellile, no slip seating and weakly Insurance QianI is searching lor sec- BOTTLED WILLPOWER!! Lose 
pay 80O-237-4642 EOE M/F/HA/ ondlme managers with an agent lol- inches 8 pounds Natural herb 
lowing, members ol the MORT and supplement #1 company in Health 
YOUR OWN TRAVEL AGENCY, successful agents lor vanes ma|or 8 Nutrition 30-day money back 
locally $7,tO0, financing available cnies and rural locations Ihroughoul guarantea Era* samplas Toll free 
Pt/Ft Fun! Easy! (Great $$$!) Out- the stale ol Virginia Guwanlwd Best 888-547-8212 
standing traval/lai benefits Com- Contracts and $$ In iha iniiutlry All 

pr»hen»ive training Frae video. Inquiries held m sinci confldenee POWERFUL WAYS to tafe control 
MoUvaladapplicanta: 800-81 1-3553 Pindar's teas paid lor hired refer- and wm m itie Traffic Courts of 
ext VA84 rats Lai's talk Fees paid Contact Virginia, by a lormer proseculer 

Dave Ban executive Salas Search Datailt i -800-250-9607 extension 
LAKE GASTON VA/NC-N«ii3b«)- 804-560-7327 or lax 804.580-7584 »1. 24 hour li»» can 
room. 2 1/2 bath 2 bonus n>oms, 

«Mral vac Stereo, dishwaaher, NORTH MYRTLE BEACH CONDO - MONEY PROBLEMS Good or Bad 
rangaw/jnil, large deck Ijoatdock 1 Bedroom, Sleeps 4 $5ZS/wli Most Credit. Consolidaie. buslnaas. per- 
Marrymoum Sub Owi^/ Agent Can weeks slillauailabia NOPETS CALL sonal 8 morfj^gas All credil con- 
Tanglewood Really 1 800-338 lor bfochure/iniormalion (804)2327- dttions accepted (8001565-4913 
8816. PO Box 116. Bracey. VA 0070 of (804)525-1825 , 



NEED HELP? 
BRAB THE LINE 

We fwM ow ^ yam of vwms ^xwt 
OwMMnthMMnM. 



THE VOCE OF HOPE 

1-MH7M717 




■i i TOninji-nM».»i itt^M^ fmm^m 



■B— 1 



; 

Virginia Beach Sun, Friday, A|»il 24, 1998 9 




Classifieds 



CALL TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 



FAR«PEQUIP/ VEHICLES 



HOMES /SALE 



TRACTOR - 175 MASSE Y 
FERGUSON. 60 HP, PS diesel, ex- 
cellent condHlon. great for farming, 
landscaping or mowing. $6200. 
Some equipment availabls. Call 919- 
348-2531. 8am-6pm. 



FINANCIAL 



A WAY TO STOP BANKRUPTCY 

Free debt consolidatton applicatbn 
with services. Stop collection calls 
Fast Help. WE CARE! Call 1-800- 
517-3406. 



AVOID BANKRUPTCY Free debt 
consolidation w/ application service. 
Cut payment to 65%. 24 iir. approval 
regardless of credit. 1 -800-873-8207. 

5/1 



FLEA MARKETS / BAZAARS 



RIVERSIDE MALL & FLEA MAR- 
KET 350 Campostella Road. Nor- 
folk. Now open Sundays from 10-4 
Call 545-2407 for table resen/ations 
and additional info. 

4/24 



Pembroke Manor United 

Church of Christ. 

600 Independence Blvd. 

3rd Saturday of each month 8 - 3 

SHOP OR SELL 

For reservaton/informatkjn 

Call 456-9106 



HELP WANTED 



ANEW AVON 

Full-time/Part-time. 
Reps, needed in Tidewater Area. 
Earn up to 50%. A fantastic oppor- 
tunity. Call 721-5622. 
^ 5/8 

REPORTER- The Tidewater News 
has an immediate opening for a 
genwal assignment reporter. Expe- 
rience preferred but will train quali- 
fied beginner. Full-time positnn. 
For more informatbn, call Jamie 
Brown 562-3187. 

TFN 



SALES 

We are kx>king for people to join our 

team who: 

" are ambitious 

"Outgoing 

~8elf-motivated 

~have a desire to succeed 

We have a unk|ue sales opportunity 

selling advertising to k>cal merchant 

that offers: 

-high earning potential 

-great benefits & 401 K 

-bonuses & incentives 

-flexibility with results 

Prior outside sales or fund-raising 
experience is a plus. Call us today: 

GETKO Group 
1-800-345-1123 
M-F 8am-6pm EST 

MYSTERY SHOPPERS NEEI^D 
in Chesapeake & Virginia Beach. 
NO PURCHASE, NO FEE. 

Call 1-800-206-1300 



SERVICE RUNNERS 

Amercan Paging & TSR Paging, 
lesKJers in the wireless industry, have 
joined together to form TSR Wire- 
lass. We are seeking responsble 
indivkjuals to make deliveries. Must 
have own car, good driving record & 
exc. references. If you want to join a 
winning team, send your resume to: 
TSR Wireless, Attn: Ops Mgr, 116 
S. Independence Blvd., Suite 109, 
Virginia Beach, VA. 23462. Fax: 757- 
552-0755. Visit our web site at http:/ 
/www.beep.(»m. EOE M/F/DA//. 

OUTSIDE SALES 

Amertean Paging & TSR Paging, 
leaders in the wirelrasindustry.have 
jplned together to form TSR Wire- 
Ims. Poskions are available for Out- 
SNJe Sates R^s. Great oppty for 

iTK^iviMed individuals who are self- 
starters w^trong communcation 
skills. Paging &/or cellular exp. a -i-. 
Excl. starting base salary. If you 
want to join a winning team, send 
^WK resume & s^aty history to TSR 
Wlrahm. fmn: Ofm Ugt, UB S. 
bid^MndwKM Blvd.. Suite 109, Vir- 
ginia teadi, VA 234^ Fax: 757- 
5^)^. Visit our mib sfta H http:/ 
/Www.beep.com. EC€ UIFIONI. 



WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTOR 

rM«(ted^)endMe indivMuaito set- 

tor. I^Mora M». a ai^Hetfhmsand 
SASE to W.H. Wisner, Whoiesate 
Distributors. P.O. Box 117. 
Wma^Mig. (Mo 44690 



JOB OPPORTUNITY 



GREAT 2ND CAREERS National 
company seeks a few individuals 
getting ready to retire/separate. Ex- 
cellent income $28-$42,000/yr. Plus 
working with military families. For 
interview call Mr. Sullivan at 460- 
4010. 

4/24 

ORIGINATORS Need 2 experi- 
enced originators. New company in 
Chesapeake. Fax only: 547-4505. 
Contact James Stamps. 

4/24 



ROOFERS NEEDED up to $15/hr. 
experienced only need apply. Nags 
Head .NC. 919-441-3405. 

424 

HELP WANTED Men/Women earn 
$375 weekly pnx»ssing/assembling 
Medcal I. D. Cards at home. Imme- 
diate openings. Your local area. Ex- 
perience unnecessary, willtrain. Call 
Mednard at 1-541-386-5290. ext. 
7174-A. 

4/24 

CO-AUTHORTTYPIST-Three his 
torical novels, one open. History and 
computer majors preferred. Movie 
Rights. Call 362-4704 for interview. 

5/15 

TERMINIX is k)oking for self-moti- 
vated people with direct in-home 
sales experience. Call Jim at 596- 
0988. 

5^ 

POSTAL JOBS 

Start at $14.08 an hour plus ben- 
efits. For exam and appleation in- 
formation Call 800-280-9769. ext 
VA 153. 9 am - 11pm, 7 days a 
week. 

4/24 

CLERICAL Part-time. Flexible 
hours. Some computer skills 
needed. Great Brkjge area. Call 
between 8 and 12 to 548-7737. 



Excellent income $28-$42,000/yr. 
Plus working with military families. 
For inten/iew call Mr. Sullivan at 
460-4010. 

4/24 



LANDSCAPING 



GRASS currmo 

Weed eating, Trimming. Cutting. 
Reasonable rates. 
Portsmouth. Call 483-6147. 

5/1 

YARD-MAN SPECIAL!!! 

Aerating & seeding special. 
We specialize in growing grass. 
Also mowing & trimmir^. 
CaM- 549-7057 
5/1 S 

P«MGOLANDWORKS-lwHlland- 
•capa, plant, car* for, and main- 
tain a baauthil ganton for you 
yaar round!!! Myleh,youpld(i,^, 
$17.99. Dtlhrarad. $ZZ.B9. Oil 
434-7449. 



HORSES & CATTLE 



3BR-2BA, KENILWORTH AREA 

Large rooms, gas heat, CA, fenced 
yard. Near base, water/sewage in- 
cluded. Available, May1. 
$530/mo. Call-491-1112 
5/1 

2 BR TOWNHOUSE-Willoughby 
Beach, 901 W. Ocean View. 
Outside balcony, water, sewage, in- 
cluded, near base. NICEIII $500. 
Call-491-1112. 

5/1 



WEDGEWOOD-NORFOLK-RENT 

Ctose to shopping center, rent to 
own, with part of rent returned. 3BR, 
fresh paint, beautiful floors, garage. 
Owner agent. 588-6828 

5/1 

COUNTRY LIVING Private 5 acres. 
3 BR 2 BATH Ranch between Em- 
poria and Lawren(»ville. Best buy at 
$79,500. George Robinson, Coun- 
try Property Specialist 804-949-7837 
Robinson Realty 1-800-998-871 1. 

4/24 



MOBILE HOMES /SALE 



DEALER WENT OUT OF BUSI- 
NESS. Save THOUSANDS of dol- 
lars on a great salactnn of Multi- 
Sectksn Homes while they last. Only 
3 Left. Chesapeake Homes (804) 
271-0509. 
S/15 

TAX REFUND SPEaAL 

Bring your tax raturn. GOOD 
CREDit, BAD CREDIT. NO 
CREDIT. All applicatons accepted. 
Chesapeake Homes. (804) 271- 
0509. 5/15 

DEALER REPOill Set up on a 
great lot. 14x76. 3BR, 2BA, Shingle 
Roof, Vinyl Skiing. Under $500 a 
month with $1500 Down and ap- 
proved credit. Chesapeake Homes. 
(804)271-0509. 5/15 

RENT TO OWN. 3 BR, 2BA. 

Chesapeake Homes. (804) 271- 
0509. 5/15 



PETS 



SHEPHERD -LAB PUPS 

4 weeks oW. littar of 1 2, all white, 2 
females left, going fast!!! Call 583- 
6579, before 10 p.m. 
5/1 

WOLF HYBRID CUBS 
WWKCREG., 1 weekoM. 
Please call 548-8309 or 579-6020. 

5/1 

AKC REQ. OOLDBI RETRIEVER 

PUPS for sale. 7 weeks ok). $250. 
Call (91 9) 357-0597. 

5/1 
HIMALAYANS, Persians, exotic 
shorthairs - young adults, neutered 
& shots. ^0 to approved homes. 
Kittens available., starting at $75. 
Call- 479-4435. 

5/1 

POODLES • STANDARD AKC 

Champnn bloodlines, health guar- 
anteed. Males and Females, blacks 
and whites. $600. 919-237-9414. 

5/1 

ROTTWEILER PUPS • 2 litters 
1st shots & wormed. Males & fe- 
males. Prices from $150 - $300. 
Call for more information. 919-435- 
2261. 5/1 

LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPS 

Knotts Island family raised. WeH 
cared for. Shots and wormed. Paper 
trained. Ready April 10. $200.00 
Call 429-^SS (evenings) Local call. 
AI2A 

GERMAN SHEmERD PUPS 7 fe- 
males, 2 males, parents on premises. 
Ist shots. $235. Call 671-8858. 

4/24 

HAPPY JACK MANGE MEDICINE: 

a natural btofKl of vag«able oils, 
promotes healing & hah' growth to 
'hot spots' & severe mange on dogs 
& horses wrmOUTsterokis. INDUS- 
TRIAL HARDWARE 4109 
BAINBRIDGE BLVD. 

(www.hapf^jackinccom) 

5/15 



YARD SALE 



APTS / FURNISHED 



YARD SALE - ININAN RIVER 

POINT- Satur^./^irilS, 1998 
1 204 Point Red Road, OiassfM^w. 
8:00 AM until ? 

Baby ctothaa, Plin «za Woflfwn's 
ctothes. di^ws, kni^ knacks, furni- 
ture. 



1 BEDROOM FURNISHED 
APAR-nHENT- NORFOLK 

Llvif^ room, kitehen, wak In ctosM, 
saoire, wall k^, with nee ca^. 
No pets. $315 mo. * D^josft. 
Call 588-3875. 

(NME BEOrnKM APARIMBfTS 

Fumi^wd aiKJ UnfunMwd. Closa 
to LMe Cr»ik and NC% BttM. Cal 
J^/(^Mn al4$}-^92or4^»^. 

4/24 



PROFESSIONAL SERVKJK 



UN»UESBWK:»MC. Uoanaad 
KM M ^M jmu tbtw and money. 
^N9% tffw^ hwja ^ iaapin g. chHd/ 
^itori^ra, riiopph^, oomplato f»r- 
Mas. oMo* s^ap«( Me. He. f^m 
Ml 1^-451-1^8. 4/24 



ARENAS AND BARNS Factory 
Deals from 24 x 36 to 70 x 1 50. Will 
deliver, can put up. Must order by 
April 30th. Call Davkj at (757) 877- 
26^. 

4 SEIB PROFESSIONAL HORSE 

jumps for sale. (1'6" or 2'6") Five 
pony saddles, bridles, pads. One 
grooming trunk filled with grooming 
gear. Six English girths. Entire 
package.. $200. Call. (757) 539- 
3680. 



Dominion Wholesale Pottery 

Concrete Lawn & Garden statuary in the unique "Grafter's 
Mall" Baxter Run Shopping, 4740 Baxter Rd., Virginia Beach, 
VA. Booth - W03 Grafter's Mall - 499-1559. 
Home Office - 485-7055 
Internet Web Page Design 
Call 485-7055 
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U Virginia Beach Sun, Friday. April 24, 1998 



Girls 5, boys 6; repairman wins in rezoning discussion 



By Lee Cahlll 

city Council Reportar 

A 6-5 vote, split by gender, won 
a use permit for Mills Lawn aid 
Garden to operate a small engine 
repair shop at 928 Commonwealth 
Plffi*. 

It was the girls versus the boys 
last week as the five women on 
City Council voted against the use 
permit and the six men voted for 
the permit. 

Remarked councilman W.W. 
Harrison Jr. after the vote, "That's 
because you don't have to mow the 
lawn." 

WCMS-FM Radio, which owns 
the building next door where it 
operates its r^io station and rents 
space to other tenants, objected to 
the location of the shop there. 



David Crowder, chief engineer for 
WCMS, said that the station tries 
to keep everything quiet and that 
the neighborhood was residential. 
The Mills' property is zoned B-2, 
however. 

He said he didn't know how an 
engine repair business would be 
compatible. 

Al Foreman, building manager 
and engineer for the WCMS 
building, said the tenants are 
concerned about the noise and said 
that a lot of children are running 
around the neighborhood. 

James H. Mills, the applicant, 
said that if the people are that 
sensitive to the noise, everyone 
who mows a lawn in the 
neighborhood would be at fault. 

Planning Director Robert Scott, 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
PUBLIC HEARING 

Virginia Beach City Council, at its Formal Session Tuesday, May 12, 
2:00 PM, will hold a PUBLIC HEARING and consider the toltawing Ordi- 
nance to amend the City Code, as it pertains to PRECINCTS and POLL- 
ING PLACES within the City: 

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CITY CODE BY ADDING TWO NEW 
PRECINCTS AND POLLING PLACES, AND CHANGING TWO EXIST- 
ING POLLING PUCES 

SECTION AMENDED: SECTION 10-1 

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA: 

That Section 10-1 of the City Code is hereby amended and reordained 
to read as folbws: 

Sec. 10-1. Establishment of precincts and polling places. 

There are hereby established in the city the following precincts and their 
respective polling places as set forth betow: 



Precinct 


Polling Place 


Alanton 


Alanton Elementary School 


Aragona 


Bayside Middle School Grade 6 


Arrowhead 


Arrowhead Elementary School 


Baker 


Heritage United Methodist Church 


Bayside 


Bayside Elementary School 


Bellamy 


Indian Lakes Elementary School 


Blackwater 


Blackwater Fire Station 


Bonney 


Center for Effective Learning 


Brapdon 


Brandon Middle School 


Cape Henry 


Research and Enligiitenment 




Building (Edgar Cayce Library) 


CappsShop 


PA. Mosquito Control Building 


Centerville 


Centerville Elementary School 


Chesapeake Beach 


Bayside Baptist Church 


College Park 


College Park Elementary School 


Colonial 


Colonial Baptist Church 


Courthouse 


Courthouse Fire Statbn 


Creeds 


Creeds Fire Station 


Culver 


Ocean Lakes High School 


Davis Corner 


Bettie F Williams Elementary School 


Eastern Shore 


Eastern Shore Chapel 


FairfiekJ 


Fairfield Elementary School 


Forest 


King's Grant Elementary School 


Glenwood 


Glenwood Elementary School 


Great Neck 


Francis Asbury United 




Methodist Church 


Green Run 


Green Run Elementary School 


Hilltop 


Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 


Holland 


Holland Elementary School 


Homestead 


Providence Presbyterian Church 


Hunt 


Princess Anne Recreation Center 


Kings Grant 


St. Nicholas Catholic Church 


Kingston 


Kingston Elementary School 


Lake Smith 


Bayside Church of Christ 


Landstown 


Landstown Community Church 


Larkspur 


St. Andrews United 




Methodist Church 


Linkhorn 


Virginia Beach Community Chapel 


Little Neck 


St. Aidan's Episcopal Church 


London Bridge 


London Bridge Baptist Church 


Lynnhaven 


Grace Bible Church 


Magic Holkiw 


Roma Lodge No. 254 


Malibu 


Malibu Elementary School 


Meadows 


Pembroke Meadows 




Elementary School 


Mt. Trashmore 


Windsor Woods Elementary School 


North Beach 


Galilee Episcopal Church 


Ocean Lakes 


Ocean Lakes Elementary School 


Ocean Park 


Bayside Christian Church 


Oceana 


Scott Memorial United 




Methodist Church 


Okj Donation 


Old Donation Center for Gifted 


Pembroke 


Pembroke Elementary School 


Plaza 


Lynnhaven Elementary School 


Point OView 


Kempsville Church of Christ 


Providence 


Kempsville Recreation Center 


Red Wing 


Fire Training Center 


Rosemort Forest 


Rosemort Forest Elementary School 


Ftoundhill 


Salem Middle School 


Budfifi 


Virginia Beach Volunteer Rescue 



Salem 

Seatadt 
Shannon 
Shen 

Sheny Park 
Sigma 
South Be»:h 



Stratford Chase 
Strav^ridge 
ThaUa 

Thoroughgood 
Timberlake 
Trantwood 
Windsor Osks 
VWtehdudc 
Vlfolf snare 
Woodstock 
Central At^entee 
Voter Precinct 



Squad BuiMing 

Sa lem Daptia t G h uw h 

Salam United Methodist Church 

Seatack Elementary School 

Church of the Ascension 

Unity Church of Tidewater 

St. Manhews Catholc Church 

St. John the Apostle Catholic Church 

Virg i n i a Beae h R e scu e G q u ad 

Contemporary Art Cantor of Virginia 
ProvMence Elementary School 
Strawt>ridge Elementary Sdiool 
Thalia Elementary School 
Independence Mkldle School 
White Oaks Elementary ScNx)l 
Virginia Beach Christian Churdi 
Wndsor Oaks Elementary School ^ 
Bayside Presfc^erian Church 
Church of the Redeemjar 
Avaton Church of Christ 
AgricultureA/oter Reg»trar 
Buikling 



Following t^sfHtmai by the United States Department of Just»« pursu- 
ant to the Voting Rights Act ci 1965, as amended, these changes will 
become effec^ve beginning with the November 3, 1998 gmerd electkxi. 

Ruth Hodges SmMi, CI^/AAE 

City Clerk 

V you are physka% dmgt^ad or visually impaired and need assistant 
tf tWs meetif^, f^^ caM the CrfY CLERK'S C^TCE ai 427-43(a; Hew- 
if^ lm|»irad, caN: TDD on^ 427-4^^ (TDD - Tetephornc D«nce for ttte 



who recommended apfvoval of the 
application, said that a lawn mower 
is not a foreign sound in a 
residential neighborhood. He said 
the ^q)earanceof the building now 
is not too good and would be 
improved by the applicant He said 



that the properly on cither side is 
also zoned for business. 

Councilwoman Reba McClanan 
asked, "Aren't we entitled to do a 
little more?" 

Scott replied that if he thought 
the use was not acceptable he 



would have recommended approval. 

Councilwoman Louisa Strayhom 
said she was uncomfortable 
moving for approval when there 
was so much opposition. 

Councilman W.W. Harrison Jr. 
noted that die wotk would be inside 



but the mowers had to be tested 
outside. 

Strayhom's motion to d«iy lost , 
by the 5-6 vote with the boys 
winning out. Thwe were just mwe 
of then. 



But who paid the school debt? 



By Lee CahHI 

City Council Reporter 

An editorial in the newqi^r 
raised questions about just who 
paid the $12 million school debt 
of a couple of years ^o. 

Was it the School Board with the 
help of the new superintendent of 
schools Dr. Timothy Jenney? Or 



was it the city? 

Mayor Meyera Obemdorf said 
that the Virginian-Pilot editorial 
said that the School Board paid die 
debt. 

Well, it did and it didn't, said E. 
Dean Block, director of 
management and the budget. 

The school system came out 



with a surplus last year of $16 
million, enough to pay the debt 
and more, which it turned over the 
city, according to policy. But die 
city, said Block, returned the $16 
million to the school system. 
What happened is Uiat the city paid 
the debt and forgave die debt 
Councilman W.W. Harrison Jr. 



summarized: "We could have kept 
it but gave it back." 

People are asking what is the 
trudi, said Obemdorf. 

"I don't think anyone is telling 
stories," said Block. "The City 
Council made a very generous 
decision." 



Bayside Library addition 



Contlnusd From Pag* 1 

The program would encumber the 
fund balance by $8.6 million. 
Usin^ these funds would work fw 
the infraistructure improvements, 
said Block, but not for staff costs 
because of the recurring expense. 

Mayor Meyera Obemdorf urged 
including projects all over the city 
in a referendum. She said that die 
city failed in its referendum when 
it included erne recreaticxi center at a 



time, but was successful when 
laying out a sysd^ for the entire 
city. 

The way the options are set up 
the council can single out slaffrng 
and Sunday hours, Block said. 

Sims said that adding Sunday 
hours will cost a half million 
dollars. 

Council is expected to make a 
decision on the referendum at die 
May 6 budget reconciliation 
workshop. 



'Bad Girls ' needed to Join 
local country dance team 



Are you a woman who loves to 
dance, dance, dance? Would you 
like to be part of a terrific daioe 
team? The Bad Giris are an all- 
female competition and 
performance country dance team 
that perform for local festivals and 
events including Chesapeake 
Jubilee, Pungo Strawberry Festival 
and various country music 
concerts. 

Members also participate in 



benefits and charities such as the 
Gourmet Gala Benefit for St. Judes 
Children. 

Auditions will be held for the 
Bad Girls, aged 21 and over, on 
Tuesday, May 12 at 7:30 p.m. and 
Saturday, May 16 at 1 1 a.m. at die 
Indian River YMCA across from 
CBN on Indian River Road. For 
further information, call Dihann 
Geier, 548-3794, or Ronni 
Maddox. 467-5926. 




Let's face it, when it comes to car repair, 
too many folks take the "if it ain't broke, don't 
fix if approach. Which probably explains why 
so many cars on the road today have shock 
absorbers or struts in need of replacing. 

That's because shock absorbers seldom 
"break". Instead, they wear out gradually over 
time. So gradually, that many drivers fail to 



realize just how worn their snocks have 
become. Well the fact is, dfiving around on a 
set of wom out sh(fcl?s1s just not safe. 

So keep that in mind the next time you're 
out and about. You might just want to drop by 
your local AutoZone and take advantage of our 
special "Buy 3, Get 1 Free" offer on premium 
Gabriel* Gas Ryder* shocks and struts. 




mMffitaaM 



'afequcriorl«Marv(*w. Oltw«xp^|ytoy31, 1998. 



The Best Parts in Auto Parts. 



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